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Itie Virginia Bea' 

5<tli Year, No. 44, Vifftiihi Bei^, V». ^^-^"'■■"^"'''■■'■"TSSSSLmr'''"^^'*"''""^"'""^^^ 



2h 916475 03/17/84 
VIRGINIA STATF LIBRARY 
SFRIALS SFCTION 
RICHMOND VA 232 Ig 








City Se^ks Assembly Action 



Police And Firefighter's Disability Claims Come Under Fire 



I 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

For the third year in a row, the City of Virginia Beach 
plans to ask the General Assembly to amend a state law 
that provides disability compensation for firefighters 
and police officers. 

Currently, the Code of Vir^nia says, in part, that the 
death or any condition of impairment of health of fire 
fighters caused by respiratory diseases and of any 
firefighters, policemen, sheriffs, and city sergeants 



caused by hypertension or heart disease shall be 
presumed to be suffered in the line of duty. Employees 
or their benefidaries who fall in this category are 
eligible to file for claims of 66 and two-thirds percent of 
theh" salaries and 100 percent of mediod costs under the 
Workman's Compensation Act. Although the d«|th or 
impairment does not have to take place on the jc^, the 
malady is, nonetheless, assumed to be work-related. 

Snce the se<^on of the code was adopted in 1976, 
there have been five police officers and oik firefighter in 



Virginia Beach who have filed disability claims. Two of 
the claims were determined to be legitimate, but, accor- 
ding to the city, three of the other claims were 
"questionable." A sixth police dBcer's claun Ihu 
Nen filed, but it has not yet been accepted or denied. 
Thus far, the city has incurred liability of $217,723 in 
disability claims, and has potential liability of more 
than $ 100,000 in another case. 

"We've got no problem with providing full disability 
under the law when it is proven that a claim is 



legitimate," says Assistant City Manager DavM 
Grochnal. "Our problem comes when, after con- 
sidering all the medical evidence, that a disability is 
shown to be not work-related. " 

GrochOMl says tho-e have been no conclusive em- 
pirical studies that have identified police office's or 
firefighters as having greater incidence of heart disease, 
hypertendon or respiratory diseases than other classes 
of people. "The city's main concern is in determining 

See legislators, Page 3 



^iM 



N 



Council Wants School 
Board Members Elected 



ByLeeCahill 
Sun Reporter 



When Virginia Beach 
Qty Council considers its 
legislative proposals for 
adoption next week, the 
package will include a re- 
quest for a study of 
elected schod boards with 
powers of taxation. 

While Coundl Monday 
afternoon included the 
schod board item it re- 
jected further consider- 
aticm of a study of directly 
elected mayors. 

It also made changes to 
two other items included 
amcHig the 17 items which 
will be recommended to 
area legislatives following 
next Monday's action for 
consideration by the 1983 
Vu'ginia General Assem- 
bly. 



'^^ 



The other change refers 
to the pnsration o[ per- 



sonal property taxes. Hie 
original proposal had 
been that the tax refund 
would be granted on pro- 
rated basis after the pro- 
perty is removed from the 
dty. The new wording of- 
fers a prorated refbnd 
only if the property owner 
leaves the locality for a 
locality wliere taxes will 
be clurged for the re- 
maining part of the year. 
Councibium Ibrold Hei- 
schober pointed out that 
only 10 cities have pro- 
ration. If the property, 
therefn-e, is moved to any 
other locality, no pro- 
tption would be allowed. 
Councilman Jack Jen- 
joings also e)cpressed con- 
cern about a proposal to 
allow localities to levy a 
general retail sales tax ai 
the rate of two percent. A 
locality at present is re- 
Sec direct, Page 9 



Cape Henry Women Meet 



Th« Cape Henry 
Womwi's Club of Virginia 
Beach will present a 
program On education at 
its luncheon meeting on 
Thursday, Nov. 11 at 11 
a.m. in Tandom's Pine 
Tree Iim. 

Guest speaker will be 
Mrs. Marcilla Humphries, 
director of the guidance 
counselors at Virginia 
B«w:h's Vo-Tech schools. 
Mrs. Hugh Tribble is 
educational chairman. 



A musical program will 
be presented by Rev. 
Frank Lawson, assistant 
minister of First Baptist 
Oiun^ of Virginia Brach, 
and his wife. Mrs. Kt^- 
neth Jard is music chair- 
man. 

Hostesses will be Mrs. 
B. Noel Fallwall and Mrs. 
H. i^ey Hatch. Table 
decorations will be 
provid«l by Mrs. Charles 
Ro^rs and Mrs. Boyce 
Webb. Call 340-5633 for 
more information. 



Duck Ina Mo^Stiiliaztc& 



The Virginia Astro- 
logical Association will 
conduct its monthly 
meeting on Monday, Nov. 
8, at 8 p.m. at Duck Inn, 
Shore Drive at Lyn- 
nhaven Inlet. 

Sandra D. McDow, a 



Fall Praise At Chapel 



In Th« SUNIIaht 



Beach Officers Honored 



Eight members of the 
Virginia Beach Police 
Department, and one 
former member, will be 
pr^ented awards on Wol- 
nesday, Nov. 3 at 10:30 
a.m. in City Council 
Chambers, City Hall 
Building, Virginia Beach 
Municipal Center. 

Awards in recognition 
of various acts of heroism, 
bravery and actions above 
what is normally exp«:ted 
of a police officer wifl be 



presented by Chief of 
Police CharlM R. Wall to: 
So-geant W. S. Boswell; 
Sageant J. M. Curran, 
St.; MPO P. J. Bender; 
MPO D. D. Hammer; 
MPO L. A. Norton; MPO 
K. W. StoUe; Officer S. K. 
Buttrey; Communications 
Officer M. Baum; and 
Formo^ Officer Warfield 
Wood. 

For further infor- 
nution, contact Captain 
E.F.Buzzy at 427-4148. 




The Threatened Future 
Of High Constables 

Wginia Beach is one of only four cities in the state 
which engages the use of a high ccmstable in serving 
legal process papers. 

It costs the city about $300,000 a year to fund the 
high constable's office, which employs 12 constables 
and two office workers, although less than half that 
amount, $142,000, is generated in fees. The remaining 
balance must be paid by the city with taxpayer dollars. 
For this reason, the Virginia Beach Gty Council is 
asking the General Assembly to lift the lid (Mi how much 
the high constable's office can charge for its services. 
Depending on what type of legal process notice is being 
served, fees range from $3.50 to $15. 

Pending General Assembly approval, \^ginia 
Beach's Ifigh Constable Thomas V. Ward is asldng for 
increases in four of the seven categories in which fees 
are charged for services rendered. The biggest 
increase, $2 would be for serving a writ of possession 
by execution. From $4 to $6. 

Ward says the increases are needed to insure that his 
ofBce is on the road to becoming self-sufficient, and so 
the constable and his deputies can continue to provide 

See CONSTABLE'S, Page 3 



1 



The Virginia Beach 
Community Chapel will 
present a Fall Praise 
Gathering on Sunday, 
Oct. 31. 

The Cbapd Choir will 
be singing the musical 
'Majesty" in both mor- 
ning services, at 8:30 and 
11 a.m. TIm Community 
Chapel is located at 1261 
Laskin Road in Virginia 
Beach. 

"Majesty" is a collec- 



tion of familiar and con- 
temporary hymns 
arranged by the noted 
mus^an, Ron Huff. The 
Chapel Choir is directed 
by Boyd Griffith, Minister 
of Music. Accompanisflf 
are Karen Hernandez, 
pianist. Bob Sears at the 
organ and Kra Poe direc- 
ting a brass ensemble. 

Child care is available 
during the morning ser- 
vices. 



"Norman The Doorman" Set 



"NcMrman the Door- 
man" and "Naughty 
EiiKkUng" will make up a 
film program fa- diild»n 
three years of age awi 



(rider on Saturday, Nov. 6 
at 2 p.m. at tlM Kemps- 
ville Branch <rf the Vir- 
ginia Betth Pri>lic Libra- 
ry. 




Lnbers and gaests of the Virginia Beach Lcpd Secretaries Assodatfoa, ftrmit to badk, teft to ri^t, ai«: 
?iM Brooks, goMt; Janet Sc«4t; MiHIe Dniner loharaii Ltaida JotasMi; Tamay Davte, ptnt; Oua 
ootfwin; Sharon Porter; JaMt CoaMr, gMst; M^ntfe IMamey; Ailcgra Wlnten; Mary Aarf^h, gMst; 
«r«a CaldweH, gocst; Patsy Bernard; Carol %iA%% T»ri HaroM; ami Kay Lawson. AH off the wwncn arc 
rgtaia Beach rcsidcBts except Goodwin, who Bv«i in Cfccw y e a ke. 

Legal Secretarim Celebrate 10th Anniversary 

he 25-member Virginia ^ach l^gal Secretary Association r&xntly ceiebmted fte ten- 
anniversary^ at a mating heU at Victoria Station. 

The evening mspmnctuat&i by a dacussion ofs&aial harrassment in the oJfUx, lead 
by John Didio, l(^ dirwtor of tfw £giui Enjoyment Opportunity Commimon. 
" mting an annivermry cake in r&:ognition of the ^cretaries were honorary VBLSA 
hcrx Philip L, Rrnso, che^ Judge, ViiginiaB^tch Circuit Court; Carter R. ^TUck" 
an attorney; J, Curtis Fruit, clerk of the Virginia B&ich Circuit Court; and 
forgan, Jr., an attorney. 



Assistants No Longer A "Girl Friday" 

M&iical Assistants Announce Recognition Week 




AppraidHaMy IM^Mi 






The first National 
Mediod A^stants W^k 
is being held Nov. 1 
thro^h 5 in conjunction 
with tt« foumii^ of the 
AwBtan Assoctetion of 
Medi«y Assistants in 
19S6, announced Anita 
SndwHn, LPN, CMA- 
AC, pttm^^t of the Vir- 
gtate Beach ChaiKs of the 
Association of 
Assistants. 



PurpoM of the wedt u 
to increase the awwr^«» 
of iHofessional m^iod 
assistanU uncmg members 
of other health 
professions as well as 
^neral public. 

"Today's medical 
amstaat can no hMgs be 
ec^^teed a *CMri I^r^gr*. 
Sm of^ has a certified 
or degrM, and takes 
fr«}wmt cmirsa to fte- 



tho- her ediKtfkm. Her 
expertise and profes- 
nonalism is reflected in 
the way she mana^s ho^ 
onployer's office," said 
Mrs. Suid^Un, a medical 
a^stant for the past 12 
yevs. 

The AAAMA's 575 
chiy^rs in 47 ^Mo aie 
apect^ to parti^Mte in 
the w^, and will ipouMir 
evoits at tte local tevd to 



help increase the 
awaren^s and umtostan- 
ding of the OMdical 
assistants' duties and 
responsibilities. Some 
chapters will sj^vsor 
career days for ftdgh 
school students wkile 
others will itrgmdxe 
special events iad 
seminars within ^i^ 
«}nununiti«. 



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2 VirgmuBeadi Sun, November 3. 1982 



Sun Cpmmentary 



Editorials 



The Constable And Sheriff 



Duplication of process. 

That's what some people in the sheriff's 
department say happens when the high 
constable's office and the sheriff's depart- 
ment arc both in the business of serving 
legal process papers. 

Even though in Virginia Beach the 
sherifrs department serves the circuit 
court and the high constable's office ser- 
ves the general district court, it is alleged 
that oftentimes deputies from both con- 
stituencies often find themselves on the 
same street, bumping into each other 
while serving papers. 

Some say its a matter of politics. Others 
say it's a matter of service. But it all 
comes down to what it costs the taxpayer 
for the services rendered. . 

The sheriff's department wants to see 
the General Assembly not lift the 
legislation enacted last year imposing 
limits on how much the high constables 
can charge. This effort would mean that 
the city would have to continue a process 
which is not cost effective and one that 
could be accommodated by the sheriff's 
department. Presumably, the sheriff's 
department would hire the constables. 
The State Compensation Board, however, 
would decide how much of the additional 
salaries the state would pay. The city 
would pay the balance. 

The high constable's office, on the 
other hand, wants to be able to raise its 



rates in order to pay the bills and to con- 
tinue its existence. Politics, it is said, is 
what prompted the Assembly to pass the 
restrictive bill last year, with little or no 
advance publicity or warning. Even 
though the bill Uniting the fees does not 
go into effect until next July 1, city coun- 
cil is asking legislators to amend the law 
beforehand, thus reversing the Assem- 
bly's prior decision. 

Virginia Beach, Norfolk, Portsmouth 
and Chesapeake are the only four cities in 
the state which still utilize a high con- 
stable's office for serving papers. Ob- 
viously, if the General Assembly does not 
lift the restrictions, it will mean that each 
city must decide for how long it wishes to 
continue to fund a high constable's office. 

Taxpayers do not want to pay higher 
fees for the legal process in which they in- 
volve themselves. The sheriff's depart- 
ment, it is said, will not raise their rates. 
On the other hand, it is said that the high 
constable's office provides better and 
swifter service. It's hard to tell which side 
is right. 

The taxpayers want the most for their 
money. As of yet, neither side has presen- 
ted testimony compelling enough to 
warrant a judgement either way. The bot- 
tom line depends on deciding which ser- 
vice will be the most efficient and at the 
lowest possible cost to taxpayers. 
— G.D.G. 



Council's Time 



X'- 

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//^ 



You may not have noticed, but mem- 
bers of Virginia Beach's City Council 
have been putting a lot of time lately into 
their elected office. 

Last week, for example, there was the 
informal, formal, and executive sessions 
on Monday, all of which lasted from S 
p.m. until 12:35 a.m. Then on Wed- 
nesday, all but two members of Council 
attended a Capital Improvement Plan 
Workshop. That seminar lasted from 5 
p.m. until after 10:30 p.m. 

Then, of course, there were the usual 
weekly ceremonial functions in which 
most of the members involve themselves. 
Meyera Oberndorf and Barbara Henley 
were spotted Friday at a shopping center, 
judging Halloween cakes. On Thursday, 
Bob Jones made a day-long trip to Rich- 
mond on behalf of the city, only to return 
that evening and deliver a speech at one of 
the city school's mock elections. 

One member estimates that more than 
30 hours were spent on Council bu$iness 
last wMk. While that may not seem like 
much to some, one must remember that 
being a city councilman is supposed to be 
a part-time position which pays just 
$10,000 per year. And most members of 
council have other obligations. 

Henry McCoy is a dentist. John Baum 
is a farmer. Butch Kitchin owns a hotel. 
Jack Jennings sells insurance. Harold 
Heischober sells cars. Bob Jones is a 
lawyer. Louis Jones owns a chain of 
funeral homes. Nancy Creech owns an in- 
sulating business. 

Of the 1 1 members, just three have no 
outside employment. They are Barbara 
Henley, Meyo'a Oberndorf and Reba 
McClanan. The r»t must »)mehow find a 
way to squee^K a full-time job in with 
thcjr old full-time jobs. For some, the 
diore is not easy. 

"I wish we did not have to spend so 
much time on council," says Bob Joi^. 
**! luul no id«i it would take up this much 
time l^ore I got into it. I have a f^Ui^ 
though, thmp wiU get better &mx we all 
adjust to Mttditobeck's styte." 

S«^ M<Coy: "We'll have to tighto tto 



ship." McCoy, the former mayor and a 
senior member of council feels there are 
too many rambling speeches at council 
meetings which he calls "boring, non- 
interesting and unproductive. "Says Mc- 
Coy: "Personally, I have a resentment 
toward working until 1 a.m. and then get- 
ting up to go to the office at 7 a.m." 

Henley, a housewife, sympathizes with 
McCoy and Jones. "City Council is an ex- 
tremely demanding job and I can under- 
stand that those with other full-time jobs 
may be having a hard time adjusting." 

Mayor Louis Jones, the man respon- 
sible for running the meetings, is 
somewhat less sympathetic. "They ran 
for the office, didn't they?" he asks. "If 
we have decisions to resolve, we are going 
to resolve them, even if it takes all night. 

Oberndorf, a housewife, says she does 
not mind the hours. "They are not that 
bad, at least to me, because I came on 
Council knowing full well of the hours 
that would be needed to fulfill my duties 
responsibly," she said. "I admit though, I 
am extremly fortunate because I have an 
understanding husband who allows me to 
put city business ahead of the family." 

Like Oberndorf, Jennings is amenable 
to the hours. "I do not find them to be 
inordinate," he says. "I figure that I 
voluntMred for this job, so I guess I have 
to take what comn with it. There is a lot 
of good dialegiie and meaningful a>m- 
munication going on at a>uncil meetings, 
and nobody is trying to tw funny and 
audition for the Johnny Carson show." 

A good thing, too, because Council is 
onbroiled now in a number of heavy duty 
decisions, the foremost of which is 
securing a long-term water source for 
Virginia Beach's 280,000 residents. Also, 
Council is working on Legislative 
proposals for the Virginia General 
Assembly and on the Capital Im- 
provement Plan. 

It is a busy time and the work, 
thanU^s. The efforts of the 1 1 dedicated 
dtizens who put up with aU the hassles 
and hradacl^ ought to be salute. 



Letters To The Editor 



Fahey Clears Up Voting Record 



Editor: 

I do not know what source Mike Gooding used to 
determine my voting record on the Viiiinia Beach 
School Board, but his article contains references to my 
votes which are inaccurate and misleading: "When nine 
members voted June 21 for college tuition rdmbur- 
seraent for employees of the school system, Fabey was 
the lone dissenter." 

No school board meeting was held on June 21. The 
regular meeting of the school bcmrd was held mi June 15 
and a special mating was held on June 29. Wh«a the 
motion was made to reimburse classroom teachers for 
tuition, I voted for the motion. In Septembo-, I voted 
against adding several categories of employees as 
classroom teacho-s for this reimbursement. The Sq?- 
tember motion extended the scopt of classroom teachers 
to include: aides, nurses, vocational evaluators, guidan- 
ce counselors, job placement coordinators and studoit 
activity coordinators. 

"When nine members supported a motion by Kem- 
psville representative Reva N. Kelberg on a special ad- 
visory conunittee appointment, Fdiey again resisted the 
flow and abstained. ' ' 

There was not one, but three appointments to this 
special advisory committee. Two of the reconunended 
appointees are colleagues at Old Dominion University. 
The subject was not included in the agenda for the 
meeting and I had no advanced background infor- 
mation about the appointments before the meeting. 
Rather than voting blindly v«thout suffident infor- 
mation and concerned that as an employee of Old 
£>ominion University I might have a conflict of interest, 
I abstained from voting for these colleagues. 

"In executive session, the nine voUng members ap- 
proved item three, Fahey voted no." My no vote was 
not made in executive session, but in open session on 



item three. No votes are taken in wecutive session. 

"At the August 17 meeting, the six other P**^ 
members voted in favor of an Item regarding psjuc 
television: Fahey abttained." This was a vote settiag 
my term as a Board Member of WHRO. I abstained 
because the vote concened my own t«m of office. In 

the foUowing vote setting Dr. E. E. BrickeD's tens as an 
alternate Board Member. I seconded the mouon and 
voted aye^with oth» monbos presmt. TItese votes cer- 
tainty do not wappoti a oonteittk» Oat I am generally tai 
disagreement with my peers and Uiat I am a dissenter. 

Regarding the editorial in the tame issue of TheSun, 
there are also some inaccuracies concerning my 
petitions on search and seizure. 

At the school board meeting I maintained that school : 

board l^al advice recommended a rtudcnt be |>reseia at 
his locker during a search for contnUwnd and that Mr. 
Patrkk Lacy, an attonwy consulted by the School Ad- 
minisu^tion hidicated that it may be desirable to have a 
student present at hu/her locker. I agreed that sudi a 
practice is not required by law, but stated that when 
available it would be denrable to have the student 
present. 

The editorial stides tiiat I do not wmt 4ni8/detecta« 
dogs to sniff out drup in sdiool lockcrt. This is not ac- 
curate. I have no reservations about principals imng 
drug-snifrtng dop and oicourage sudi a practice ii 
deemed necessary by school administraton. My objec- 
titm is tiie use of drug-sniffing dogs at the initiiakm of the 
police and with police involvonent without a search 
warrant. 

Sinco'cly. 

John A. Fahey, Member 

Virginia Beach School Board 



Committed To Success 



Editor: 

I would like to thank members of your staff, 
especially Mr. Rick Coard, Jr., for their efforts and 
creative talents in developing the "Arts and Grafts - 
Collectibles and Antiques" page. 

It was a pleasure to find your representatives with a 
willingness to accept suggestions and an ability to take 
ao idea and make it^cpai. 



■;i1J 



»#^»' 



Mr. Cbard conveyed enthusiasm and commtttment 
for a successful ad campaign for all of us who 
participated. 

We are pleased witii the results and kxik forward to 
working with you in the future. j. 

My God bless you all. "^ 

Linda Jahnke, 
Countryside SKps. 
Yirginiaf 



„jBrt*^^#)»' 



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Library Columns Appreciated 



Edit(M:: 

I would just like to let you know that David Pahner's, 
as well as the other librarians who pen "Library 
SUNlines," articles are enlightening and in my opmion, 
well written. 

Virginia Beach public libraries are a tremendous 
asset to city residents, but oftentimes people have no 



idea how much and what kinds of informiuioo are 
actually available at tiie tibrary. With your weekly 
library cdunms, however, mudi mere insight is gained 
into what Virgfaua Beach Utouies actiudly aikt. 

Ronnie Moore, 
Vl^inia Beach 



Library 
SUNlines 



•f 



Ubrariaa Carob* Pm«i 




Books To Warm The Soul 

Despite the lingering days of Indian summer, Virginia 
Beach residenU have already felt enough of a nip in the 
air to begin believing that Winter and cold weatho- will 
soon be here. With Winter will come this year's stn^e 
to heat our homes comfortably and economically. This 
combination of comfort and ea>nomy need not be a 
contradiction in terms for homeown«^. 

The Virginia Beach Public Library has a collection of 
books and materials to help you prepare your hoi^ for 
cold weather. Some of the tips you can read about in- 

» CltKif' ■ 

•Check the insulation in your cdlinp. 3' of m- 
sulation will rwluce ceiling heat k»s by 77%. 

•Check caulkmg around windows, doors, uid vent 
openinp. Repair or replace any aulking found loose or 
damaged. 

•Insulate single-i»ned windows by tackiiv on a sheet 
of polyethylene plastic. 

•Compare insulation by R-value not by thickness. By 
raising the R-value of the insulation in your home, you 
<xn save 20-30% on your home luting bills. 

•Keep your thermostat at 65*F. durii^ tlte (hiy and 
53* at night. F<v every de^ee that your h^ite's tem- 
perature dro|», you*tt haiwnviii^ of about 3%. 

•Install a tinter on your tlMHm»»tat. 



•Make sure your tlwrmostat is on an int»ior wall and 
that windows near it are kei^ tightly dmed. 

•Clc^ off unoccupied rooms aiul dose the vents in 
them (unless you have a hem. pomp). 

•Opoi tiie dnpts of wimtows facing south to take 
advantage of the sun's warmth. 

•Check your windows and doors for cold air entaing 
by moving a lighted candle around the frames. If the 
flame flKkers, <»rid air it leqring into your house. 

•Keep your firqdace dampCT d<Med between fires. 

•Reanange furniture awi^ from cokl outside wails. 

You may iwrticulary want to dieck the area libraries 
for titles such as time: 

Consumer Rqwrts: 'Mon^-saving gukle to en«iy fai 
the hcmie." Off^ tnaml num nUinp of proihicts; 
work sleets to estunate faisulation requircmoits, coA ef- 
fectivenos of storm wiixtowt; offoY advice in Uring a 
contractor; and Vsts federal and state eno'gy rdated 
financial in^tives to hooMOwi^. 

D&vm, Ronald. "How to cut your energy bills." 

Discimes various to|^ induding woito barrien, 
applian^s, willows tmi (toon, vatOatkHi, heating 
systons, ccmiirianait«ry heat sources anl ofVtrs a 
seasonal house CJggy dtedtliit. 

"H(m to sUrink your ene^r Ulls." Gives useful tips 
on energy ccmservatkm and loe. 

|^d>urg, I^ne Cunum^. "Tlw tonte ei^rgy Mnr: 
all tht fKts you need to save oMrgy ikrilars." Owt^tt 
informttkm on dec(Vi^iv to nw am^, diwaMAnis 
of h^iii^ s^tott and means to imiH'ove ymxt tone's 
e^Tfy saving qwHtett. 

IN%e. Klly L. "Homeemoa'* gukle to laviiv 
energy." Discusses InaukUion. w^iher stri|^^. 
toui^i s^t^os, bumkiiftes, i|^u»«, ttc. 

UbeU. A. "Al UbeU'i eacrgy-M^ gidde for 
hcmeowi^." Inchides an mugf quottot qimtfraaire 
so thttt lunneownmi can iMe lb» i^fm to wUA thef 
arera^D'-wtte. 



VSm4m-%m; PnMihii WsJawiiyi, 

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AKMMfAnMs 
Tw*y«OT-ti7ji 



Letters Welcome 

Urn Vk^a^ Bm^ ^m mkfmm t^ 
m^^n^ iM^s to Oit mmor, nty 
^mU t0 t)^^ ^M$ 0m^ ^ In- 
i^Mb tht w«M mm$, i^Ukm Mtf 
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Legislators Say 
Action Unlikely 



Virginia Beach $un, Novembo^ 3, 1982 3 



I Continued from Page 1 

what caused the impairnient/' says Bob Esenbcrg, the 
city's IBsk MaaagemeDt Admialstnitor. "If you've got 
a guy. in a nm-risk positioi, and then he has a heart 
attack cme weekend while digging up his garden, we 
have to take a hard loc^ at something like that." 

^t. Danny Kappera of the Virginia Beach Crime 
Prevention Unit says he is "aggravated" by the city's 
annual effort to amend the code. "If the City people 
would just talk to police psychologists, they would 
know thne is a great deal of str^s in police work," he 
says. "You would be amazed to learn of the 
l^ysiological dianges a police officer's body undergoes. 
When the call comes down that there is an armed rob- 
bery in process, your heart rate about doubles and your 
stomach binds up. 

"I undastand that the city has to do what it has to 
do," Kappers ointinued. "But, we have been protected 
by this legislation for a number of years and I wouldn't 
appreciate having it taken away. Plus, I don't think any 
doctor can say whether or not a heart attack is work- 
related." 

Police Chief Charles R. Wall said he "would support 
the measure and be the first one to go after those people 
who abuse the law." Wall said he knew of no such 
abuses. "My pM>ple enjoy what they are doing and they 
want to go back to work as soon as possible," he said, 
adding that "police offic^-s are under a lot of tension all 
the time." 

Fire Chief Harry E. Dloel says he is "not in favor of 
changes to the present law." Said Diezel: "It is pretty 
obvious that inhilation of gasses like carbon monoxide is 
going to increase the chances of getting emphezema. 
Also, the stress of fighting fires obviously would do no 
good for one's heart." 

Diezel managed to get his points across last week to 
Grochmal, and he won a re-wording of the city's 
legislative proposal on the matter. The city had sought 
to repeal the section of the code entirely, eliminating the 
automatic presumption of casual connection between 
physical imparments and job-related stress. Instead, 
Virginia Beach will now seek to amend present law, 
giving the city the option to refuse disability claims 
when "competent evidence indicates such impairments 
did not arise out of the line of duty . " 








Henley 

"I want to be com- 
fortable knowing that 
changes would 
protect genuine cir- 
cumstance where the 
disability is work- 
related. " - Henley 



JcBBlagi 

"They are obvi- 
ously under a great 
deal of stress and they 
need this law... God 
bless them. " - 
Jennings 



Jones 



"ff the state legis- 
lature wants this law, 
then they ought to be 
the ones paying for 
it." - R.Jones 



McCbuuui 

"I would like the 
benefits to be as equal 
as possible, but there 
are many stressful 
jobs in Virginia 
Beach. " - McClanan 



O'Brien 

"I'm not aware of 
any movement within 
the House or Senate 
which would indicate 
passage of this 
proposal. " - W. R. 
O'Brien 



£>uring the 1981 and 1982 sessions of the General 
Assembly, house bills were introduced which would 
have allowed the State Industrial Commission greater 
leeway in determining the validity of police of fleers' and 
flreflghters' disability claims. The bills never made it to 
a vote, however, because they were killed in the House 
Committee on Labor and Commerce. What chance, 
then, would the amendment have this time around? 

"I don't think it will do very well this year, either," 
said Grochmal. "Every year there is a SKxy strong 
group of firefighters and police offlcers lobbying a- 
gainst it." 

"I don't plan to introduce any legislation on the mat- 
ter to the assembly," said Delegate Gtenn McCfaaan ci 
Virginia Beach's 84th District. "This would need to be 
supported state-wide, and I don't believe it is At this 
point. I would like the benefits to be as equal as is 
possible. But, there are many stressful jobs in Virginia 
Beach. Plus, this year is going to be the short session, so 
we won't cover as much legislation anyhow." 

Delegate W. R. "Buster" O'Brien of the 8Sth District 
said he "is not in favor of legislation reducing benefits 



for police officers and fu-efighters." Said O'Brien: 
"I'm not aware of any movement within the House or 
Senate which would indicate passage of this proposal. ' ' 

City Council, currently in the process of mulling over 
the 16 legislative proposals, appears somewhat split on 
the matter. While all councilmen contacted favored 
providing liability in those cases proven to be work- 
related, there was disagreement about how to go about 
doing so. One, Lynnhaven Borough Representative H. 
Jack Jennings, Jr., opposed any alterations to current 
law. "I've talked to the officers, God bless them, and 
they work horrendous hours and see very little of their 
families," he said. "They are obviously under a great 
deal of stress and they need this law. I'm going to do 
everything in my power to fight to protect this benefit 
for than." 

KempsvUie Boroo^ Councilman J. Henry McCoy, 
Jr. says the law "should be left alone." Said McCoy: 
"Once you get a law like this on the books, it is real 
hard to take it off. I know there have probably been 
cases when it has been misused, but by removing the law 
we would wind up hurting the people who legitimately 



need it." 

Mayor Ix>uls Jones was somewhat less sympathetic. 
"Nobody gets everything he wants," said Jones. "If, 
however, their problems are shown to be service-related, 
I think they are entitled to their liability coverage." 

At-large Councilman Robert G. Jones said the 
responsibility tOi making liability payments for work- 
related disabilities ought to lie with the state gover- 
nment. "If the state legislature wants this law, they 
ought to be the ones paying for it," said Jones. "I am 
for any benefit our firefighters and poUcemen are en- 
titled to, but right now we are making the payments for 
what the state thinks is good." 

Vice Mayor Barbara M. Henley says she favors 
change in the present wording of the law. "I want to be 
comfortable knowing that changes would protect 
genuine circumstances where the disability is work- 
related." 

Mayor Jones said he expects Council and the City to 
draft a final resolution on the matter by mid-November 
for forwarding to the General Assembly. . 



YOU CAN BE PART OF 
THE MOST EXCITING 
COMBATANT SHIPS 
IN THE WORLD 



Constable's Office Needs Rate Hike To Stay In Business 



n^ 



<A. 



i" 'j',t, ) , {. J 

iaiiliji'iiV 



Continued from Page 1 

the same service as always, namely, not charging to 
serve papers fw traffic, criminal, and juvenile cases in 
the city's General IXstrict Court. TTie constables only 
charge for serving civic, or small claims court papers. 
Ward says that of the total number of papers served 
annually, two-thirds of them are served gratis. 

The last fee increase came in 1975, Ward said, and 
befwe that in 1933. 

The Virginia Beach Sheriffs Department serves legal 
process papers for tliD city's Qrcuit Court. The 
categories fw which ibe , papers are served are 
practically the same as those the constable's officer 
serves, only the rates are just a little lower. The ftmds 
generated frwn these fees, however, do hot go back 
into the city's treasury. The monies go back to the 



sheriffs department and back to the state. 

S(xne experts say that by limiting what the 
constables' can charge, the fee restrictions will fo-ce 
the high constable out of business because it's 
questionable how Icmg the city will continue to finance 
the ofBce. If this happened, someone would have to 
pick up the slack left by the vacated coistable's office. 

If the high constable's office dissdved, it would also 
mean the eliminaticm of an expenditure bcm. the city 
budget. 

If the General Assembly decided to lift the fee 
limitations fron the high constables office, it wcmld 
effectively allow that office to attempt to be cost 
effective. If the lunita^i^ns «-& t^ififoaxd, the high" 
const^ble^ office will be ^cedio'cut back on pers^nel 
or begin charging fen- services which are not being 
charged for now. 



T-Student Creative Corner 



ENGINEERS 



>'"* 



The world's mc«t exciting surface combatant ships 
/ are now bem^ deigned, buitt and overhauled at Ingalls 
Shipbuilding Dvision of Litton Industries, on the Gulf Coast of 
Mi^issippl. IngaMs' engineering and construction contracts on 
U.S. Navy ships Indude the CG 47 Oass of Aegis Cruisers, 
LHD 1 amphibious assault ships, and the nnodemization and 
reactivation of the V\torid War II batdesNp USS Iowa (BB 61). 

Oppdrtunitles available now! 

a ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 

• Inrtrum w iiaUo n ancI 
Conlrolt EngiriMrs/Daslgners 
PropuMon and Eiec. Plant; Gas lUrfoines 
Slaam Plant. DIaaal 

• Powar Syaism Englnaars and Oesignars 
60and400HZ 

a MAMNE/iyiECHANlCAL ENGINEERS 

a Prepiri^on 
aHacNnary 

A Mnipn 

D COMBM- SYSTEMS ENGWIEERS 

D NAVAL ARCHITECTS 

D LOGSnnCS ANALYSTS 

aOUTflTTVIQAND 

FURM^MNQDSIGNERS 

If you toe/ yow backgrourid nrnrte c&rtsid»atk)n, pl&e^e 
caH ton free 1-&K>-647-eO70, Ext. 1269, or send your 
resume and s^ay hMory, in cor^ctorice, Ux 

P i daaalonal Bnptoyinam 

m Ingalls 
Shipbuilding 

Litton ROBoKl4«,Pascagoula,Ms^ssippi39S67 



iqi^ OlpportunNy &npk>yar 



U.S. QHanahlp naquvwl 



Hope Is ... 

As 1 look up into the sky 

I sometimes hope the world will pass me by. 

I think of dreams that were in the 

past, looking for the future is 

sometimes the best. 

I dream about football and becoming 

a big star, as I sit there and 

wonder 1 seem so far. 

As the days go by and the years 

pass, I hope someday to become a success. 



Poems By Bonnie Hohbs 



Who Am I? 

The sky is beautiful, 
And so am I. 

The dirt is brown, 
And so are my eyes. 

The moon is good. 
And so is my soul. 



DoBoie is theaon of Mr. and Mrs. WiUlam P. Hobbs. He is also a student in Mrs. Shirley Hariey's fifth 
grade class at Arrowhead Elementary School. 

VMaia Beach l^^^ t^ tcn^m w« lavltod aad cMowatcd to ntarit completed cnmplet of ttndeat creative wrldag to The 
Vktinia JMr* &m for poMMt pMkatfoB. Euwpict anit iKlade the rtMknt'i comirietc nme, age, grade level and parents' com- 
pile Mf Alao iBctadc the rnmplili mmt of ttc •tadMt'i Eagysh tcteher ami tke Khooi's aame. Mail sabmissioiu to The Virgiiiia 
Bcack Sm, 131 S. BMMBoat iMd, Vli|taria BcMk, VA, 234S2. For More Inf omatioD call 486-3430. Deadline for each Wednesday's 
edition b the nMajr hcf ore. 



WE'RE MOVING! 





Farfielcl 

PTICPIL 

Center 

STOPBYANDSEE 
HOW WE'VE GROWN 



SIM FAIRFIELD 

SHOPPING CENTER 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 

495-1974 



I 



Correction 

In last week's story on 
the new fourth grade text- 
book entitled 

"E.S.C.A.P.E.," the 



name of the book's author 
was misspelled. It should 
have been Rob Poyner. 



g 



Century 21 Apollo would Hkc to aniwunce 

the winners of their Halloween 

Coloring Contest. First Place: Roberta 

Rodiack, Melissa St. Pierre and Vanessa 

Byrum. Second Place: Doug Byrum, 

Michelle Hughes, and Danny Kelly. 

Third Place: Stacy Tew, Jessica Smith, 

and Leslie Bobb. 





Leighton 

Leighton 
Promoted 
At Bank 

Kenneth W. Farmer, 
President and Chief 
Executive Officer of Cen- 
tral Fidelity Bank an- 
nounced the promotion of 
Virginia Beach resident 
Barbara S. Leighton to 
operations officer. 

Barbara has been em- 
ployed byCentral Fidelity 
for the past ten years, with 
seven of the most recent 
years in a supervisory 
capacity with the 
Operations Center. 

She is a member of the 
National Association of 
Bank Women and attends 
Holland Road Baptist 
Church in Virginia Beach. 



CLASP 

Meeting 

CLASP (Citizens 
Loving All Special People) 
will hold its monthly 
business meeting Satur- 
day, Nov. 20, at 8:30 p.m. 
Location will be at the 
Fow Creek Recreation 
'Jenter, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road, Virginia Beach. 
The meeting is being held 
in conjunction with a dan- 
ce. 

All voting members are 
encouri^ed to attend. All 
other interested persons 
are also invited to attend. 

For further information 
odl either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
at 486-3110. 



MICHAEL F. 
FASANARO, JR. 

Attontty 
At Law 

5 Kc^er Exwutiw Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Va. 23M2 



«» 



■■■iHan^M 



^■p 



4 VifpiM Beach Sm, November 3. 1W2 



Entertainment 



"The Singing Swards" 



13-Year-Old, And Father, Making Music In Virginia Beach 



BjrCkegGoldfiub 
SunEdhor 

She and her f atta- are sfxnetimcs 
billed as "The Singing Swards." 
although 13 year old Dana Sward is 
uiiquestH»ably the »ar of the diow. 

Dana, an e^th gratkr at Indepen- 
dence Junior High School, is the 
du«hter of Dr. Sid Sward, a physical 
educati(»i profe ss or ai Norfdik ^ate 
University, Norfolk. Dan's mmher, 
Lynne. is a fiber artist. The family lives 
in the Pemteoke section of Virginia 
Beach. 

On weekends Dana aiKl her father can 
sometimes be found serenading 
cimcMsas at the 10th SsntX Cafe on 
Atlantic Avraue, when headhner Connie 
Parko is on break. She stxaXis from 
table to table, accompanied by ho- father 
(» accordian. bellowi^ out songs with 
such professicmalism that the entire 
restaurant hudies to hear the Uttle girl 
with the booming voice. 

"She's small for ha age," her fatlwr 
said. "She doesn't look 13." 

Dana is hooked on video games, likes 



New Wave music, and disr^ards ha 
braces when eclairs are in sight. 9ie 
studies voice, piano, and is a member of 
the school's gymnastics team. Balance 
beam is her specialty. She also plays the 
flute. But singing is what she does. best. 

"We used to travel a lot." she said. 
"And when we were in the car I'd make 
up the words to my own songs and sing 
them." Dana has a brother, Scott, a 
sophomore piano major at East Carolina 
University. Greenville. N.C. Her sistCT 
Pamela, 18, is a communications major 
at Tidewater Community College. 
Virginia Beach. 

Ehma's father has been a professional 
musician since 19S4 and is currently a 
member of the Norfolk Musician's 
Union. He's not pushing his daughter 
into the spotUght, but he's showing her 
where it is. 

"I'm trying to give Dana a well roun- 
ded musical repertoire," he said. "She 
can do ethnic songs, oldies, and show 
tunes. She knows more, but there's 
about 300 songs that we do together." 

In Sept., 1982. Dana sang before 



l.SODShrinersatthePimlion. 9ie has 
ako performed in Hans|Mon and in Nor- 
folk. And for now, thitt's enough. Her 
father doesn't plan to take her to New 
York. yet. Loca%, thiqr*ve looked into 
television, but are told diere's not much 
of a market for girls with braces. 

Because Dana is refattively yom^. 
much attention is to iKm much ^ uses 
her still growing vocal ocMds. For this 
reason. Dana sticks to scmgs like "An- 
nie." "New York." or "TomcMTOW," 
and does not sing any so^s that require 
much screaming and yelling, like is 
required in gospel musk. 

Dana's father said audiences are 
usually impressed with Dana for two 
reasons: 

"People are amazed that such a Ug 
voice comes out of such a small girl," 
Dr. Sward said, noting that Dana is oi^ 
4'6" tall and wdghs 60 Am. "Secondly, 
she has a tremendous amount of stage 
presence for a girl only 13 years old." 

Dana is proud of ha singing, and will 



1^ tlw notes flow at a nxniient's iioti«. 

"I am say dght alphabets in one 
breath," she says proudly. 

Dana said that artiile sin^ng, she is 
May attentive to her audioice hot admits 
she had a tendoicy to look up. In the 
future she plans to auditimi fcv local 
musicals productions to help her 
profesaonal performances. Eqierience. 
die says, is the key to nKce». 

"I've g(H to be in a 1(M of muacals," 
she said, "and it's good that I can go 
with my dad on a lot of his muacal jobs. 
Peopte have a dumce to see who I am." 

Dana said that imlike most pe(H^, she 
is ntM nervcHU when die sings. Hct voice 
is IKM imique in tone or style, she says, 
but her {vojec^ioo is commanding. 

"My vcHce is not unique but I can sing 
knidly." she said. "I hate peoirie who 
sing so softly you can't hear them." 

Dana's favorite perfimners are "The 
Split Ends," a New Wave group, and 
BarlMa Streisaml. 




"The Siiaging Swanb," Dua and Sidney Sward. 

"My voice is not unique but I can sing 
loudly. I hate people who sing so softly you 
can't hear them" - Sward 



The Barnetts : 
A Family JEuU 
Of Talent 



More and more Vii^inia 
Beach residents are being 
drawn to the Little Thea- 
tres by the use oi new 
talent and featuring new 
and old favorite prodiKA- 
ions is the Bamett £unily. 

Bob aiKl Merry Bamett 
live in the Aragona area (^ 
Virginia Beach with their 
two children. Blake and 
Mindy. Bob is the vice 
president of the Fairfield 
branch of the Qtiacns 
Trust Bimk and Merry is 
employed as a nufs^4»y 
Dr. J. S. Garrison. 

Last summer Merry de- 
cided they needed a fami- 
ly project and that is when 
they became interested in 
the Little Theatre. Merry 
and the children auditioD- 
ed for "Annie Get Your 
Gun", at the Virginia 
Beach Little Theatre and 
were given small parts. 
Dad, not wanting to be 
left out (rfthis adventure, 
joined the stage crew. 

The Barnetts are very 
qualified in musical enter- 
taiiunent. Bob has a B.A. 
in music education and 
voice fi^om Pepperdine 
University in Qdifomia 



and is the choir director 
for the Church aX. Christ in 
Aragona. Merry studied 
professional theater at 
Pasadena Play Ikxise in 
California and has model- 
ed and been in a few T.V. 
and radio commercials in 
the Virginia Beach area. 

About four years ago 
Bob and Merry formed a 
gospel group call "The 
Power and light Comp- 
uiy' ' . Marie Ocampo and 
David Verdes joined as 
vocalist. Verdes is also 
eiuxllent at accompaning 
on the keyboard. They 
perform throughout the 
area using their talents to 
express their faith. 

Blake, 12 years and 
Mindy. 10 years are stud- 
ents at Norfolk Christian 
School. They are being 
introduced to music not 
only through talented pa- 
rents but BlalK is taking 
piano and Mindy is being 
instruaed in violin. The 
children are members of a 
dioral group called "The 
Reflections" and have 
performed in several mu- 
sicals directed by Mrs. 



City, School Employees 
Hold Annual Art Show 



The City of Virginia 
Beach will sponsor its 
Third Aimual Employees' 
Arts and Crafts Show 
through Frkiay, Dec. 10 
from 9 a.m. to S p.m. tin 
Operations Building, 
Virginia Be»:h Municipal 
CentCT. 

Fifty-two city and 
school artists will compete 
for 20 riblxms. Jud^s are 
Mrs. ^q^iou Runyon, 
co-ordinator of art. 
Virginia Beach Public 



Schools; Dr. NaiKy Jones, 
^aff assistant, curriculum 
assessmoit development. 
Virginia Beach Public 
Schools; and Nancy 
Sosda, staff wwker with 
the city's Parks and 
Recreation Department. 

The art works will in- 
clude photography, 
drawings, oil paintings, 
ami needkpcrint. 

Call 427-8704 f<x more 
informttwn. 




CHARLES 
IREPAIR service: 

SEWING MACHINES A 
VACUUM CLEANISS 

WE SERVICE 

ALL MAKES 
AND if IT TAKES OVER 24 MRS. TO 
REPAIR YOUR MACHINE^ 
WE'LL LOAN YOU ONE! 

WE MAKE HOUSE CALLSIII 

497-4M1 (« 467-1913 

4M (VAL AVE.*NCmFOIJL, VA 
O^MMON.-SAT. - . \ 

9a^.laNp«. f ." I 






The Baractt Faayiy 



Betty Fitzgerald. 

Singing has always 
been the main interest, 
however Bob has taken to 
acting. The entire family 
is now performing in "Fi- 
onello" at the Portsmouth 
Little Theater. Bob acqui- 
red the role of one of the 
men characters called 
"Maris." It is easy to 
see by watching Bob that 
he enjc^s singing and 
acting for an audience. 
Merr>' and the children 



are a pleasant addition to 
the chorus. 

Merry said, "we are 
k»king forward to new 
opportimitks in the fut- 
ure. We've enjoyed work- 
ing together and I believe 
it has been a good experi- 
en(x for the children, 
however our church, 
work, and school are our 
first priorities and we 
iKipe to begin to adjust 
back to the normal pace of 
our family very soon." 



Virginia 

AUTO RENTAL 



IncOTpcmUed 




5901 Virgima Be^d: Blvd. 



Meetings, Trips, Puppets, Dog Show, Picnic . 



The Qty of Virginia Beach, publk inftvmation 
office, has announced the following activities: 

Lake Snrith/Hajiood Ctrk Lc^ne, Bayridc 
PrcsbytRten Ckwch meeting on Thursday, Nov. 
4 at 8 p.m. Guest spcako- will be City Manager 
Thranas H. Muehknbeck. 

Tr^ to Naliond Aqnartaai in BaMbaore to 
.xamine the needs for a marine educatkm omter in 
Virginia Beach on Friday, Nov. 3. Depart from 
the Dome parking lot at 6:30 a.m. Contact Mac 
Rawls, director. Virginia Museum of Marine 
Sciences at 422-3814 for mote informatMn. 

TMewatn- Koud dabr Al Bread Dog Show 
Friday through Sunday fran 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 
the Pavilion. Call 428-8000 for more information. 

"The WUlng Fairy" pvpct skow on Satur- 
day. Nov. 6 at 11 am. at the Vkginia Beach 
Recreation Coiter. Konpsvilte. Call 493-1892 f(x 
more information. 

Picnic ta the park. Barrilc Fanu Park, on 



Sunday, Nov. 7 from noon to three p.m. Call 493- 
1892 for more information. 

Off CoaneU Mcctii^, city haU building, 
mtmicipal center on Monday, Nov. 8. Infcmnal 
session at 12:30 p.m. and formal session at 2 p.m. 

Piaaniac ConuniMioa oMcting in city coui^ 
cfaambos on Tuesday, Nov. 9 at noon. Artt and 
Htunanities Commission mating on the same di^ 
at 4 p.m. at the Pavilion. Frkwte of Music ccmcot 
that night from 8:30 to 10:% p.m. at the Pavilion. 

y^tJUlM Beach Devdopocnt AatlMffty mtttrng 
on Wednesday, Nov. 10 at 8:30 a.m. at the 
development center, 401 Lynnbavoi Parkway. 
Socan Services AdviMry Board meeting the same 
day at 2:30 p.m. in the Human Resources 
Building, 3432 Virginia Beadi Boutevard. 

Coancil of Qvie OrsaaliitfioM meting cm 
Wednesday, Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. in city council 
chambers, city hall building, municipal center. 



THE ALL NEW 

PLAZA ROLLER SKATING RINK 

2764 GODWIN BLVD. SUFFOLK (RT. 1 0) 
. IS HAVING A 

GRAND OPENING 

ON SATURDAY, NOV. 6, 1982 7 - 9:30 & 9:30 - 12 
LOTS OF FUNN, GAMES, AND PRIZES! 



GRAND PRIZES 



• PINBALL MACHINE 

• Ipr. RIEDELL SPEED SKATES 

• Ipr. PACER SKATES 

• 35mm CAMERA 

• TEE SHIRTS 

• FREEPASSES 



THURSDAY NITE 
FAMILY NITE 

7-9:30pin 
' $2.00 for a 
famUydfS 
75- skate remai 
trrfnintfy 3 parem 
must arconY>any 
chNdren ertire n«e 
if not restrfar add 
&rem^ 

WEDNESDAY NITE 
SCHOLARSHIP .NITE 

7 9.30 pm 

A's&B'sonyour 

report card \mM 

get yoy special 

^countpMses 

$t.75r^utaradd 

JS^sla^renM 





TO BE ELIGIBLE TO WIN GRAND 
PRIZES you MUST BE PRESENT 
9:30 TILL MIDNITE 
ADMISSION FOR GRAND 
OPENING NITE $3.50 GENERAL 
ADMISSION WITH OR WITHOUT 
SKATES. 

FOR MORE INFO. CALL 934-Funn 



SATURDAY 
MORNING 
KIDDIE KLUB 

10»n-12noon 
SI 50 add. 
.75^ skate rcm^ 
(1Syears«Ki 
itfKJeronly) 

& dcxHAs for pw ents) 



SKATING LEMONS 

SAT. MORNING KIOCNE KLUB LESSOiS 
9:30 - 10 am S3.00 INaUOES SKATE RENTAL. 
Vs hr OF INSTRIXTKDN, ALSO THE 10-12 mXM 
KlUBSFSSION 



THURS. NITE ADULT UES^MS 

6» / r^*" ^^00 INCIUWS SKATE IW<ITAL. 
VMw Ol INSl«UClKJN*Ata> / 9 -Wf AAWIV NITE 




nUVATELES^^tt 
CAU 934-FUNN 



V 



Virginia Bn^t^fNovraab^ 3. 19t2 S 



Entertainment 



»'V 



Pavilion Hosts Pianist, Students, Pops, Ballet, Cooking School 



the following activities are scheduled for the 
Virginia B«u:h Convention O^ter, The Pavilkm: 

Nov. S to 7: Tidewater IUbbcI Qab All Breed 
Dog Show. 

Nov. 9: Friends of Mo^ presents "Bella 
Davidovich" (pianist). 

Nov. 10: Public schools co^p idght. 

Nov. 13: Communique Production Presents 
"Issac In Concert." Also, Tidewater Scout Show 



Exhibition. 

Nov. 14: ViiiiBia Sundays Pops Concert 
presents Charlie Byrd. 

Nov 16: Prices microwave cooking school and 
nhibition. Free. 

Nov 19: Tidewater Ballet Association presents 
"DiePuppenFee." 
Nov. 26 to 28: Countryside Christmas Mariict. 



': thanksgiving Dance Set For Handicapped 



A Thanksgiving Dance 
fpr ph^ically and men- 
Ally handicapped pMple 
wll be held Saturday, 
f ov. 20, from 6:30 to 9:30 
" m. Location will be at 

le Bow Creek RecrMtion 
^cnter, 3427 Clubhouse 
|Load, Virginia Beach. 

The dance will be spon- 



sored by the Community 
Services Board of Virginia 
Beach, CLASP (Otizens 
Loving All Special People) 
and tiM Virginia Beach 
Departm«it of Parks and 
Itecreation. 

Participation is free. 
Refreshments will be ser- 



ved and door prizes will be 
given. The latest hits will 
be'i^ayed. Parents and 
guardians are welcome, 
however, chaperones are 
present at all times. 

Transportation is avail- 
able from your area; how- 
ever, for planning pur- 



poses we must know by 
Nov. 11 if transportation 
is needwi. Call Joy Stin- 
nett at 499-7619 weekdays 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For further information 
call either John Ditty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
at 486-3 110. 




Antiques Show 



<«^ 



The Frincwi A«»f W«a«'i CW» hMted iMr 24IIi Annual Antlqnej Show last week a( the l*«*"|o«>- 
iBspectint Om want wn, st hfl, Deedy Lawwn and Lottie lawrence of Hampton; and, at right. Mary 
LaViola and Mafiarct Oruipier of Portinionth^ ' 




SKATE-ARAMA 

1420 N. Geo. Washington Hwy. 

485-5537 

OK 

399-8113 



November Specials 



SATURDAY*NOV. 6»9 AM-5 PM 

ALL DAY SKATE BENEFIT FOR THE 

VIRGINIA MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION 

$3 ADMISSION-8 HOURS SKATING 

BRING A SPONSOR SHEET AND WIN 

A PRIZE! , 



Sat., Nov. 13 — Free Video Games 

Two FREK Gtmcs per S«wloil(PAt MAN. Moon Crwla. Super Tank) 

Sat., Nov. 20 — Bargain Day 

All sessions $1.50* admission! 

THANKSGIVING SPECIALS 

Wcd^, Nov. 24 — 7 p.m. till 11 p.m. 

$1.50* tdmlMlon-PLUS-Two FREE video Games 

Fri., Nov. 26 — All Day Skate 

50<* per li^r-PLUS-Door Prizes every hour on the hour! 



10 a.m. till 4 p.m. 




<^i 




*Skate Rental Not Included 



Photographer Awarded 



viroini. Bnch DhotocniDlicr Archie E. McDearmid, Professional Photographen of ^f'^*^^ J" *^ 
l^U^^SZJS^T^nM P. Beyer during . Veg«. Also present to co-gr.t.i.te McDe««ld w« 
rweirt^wwito ceremony nt the convention of the William J. Denli (center). 



To Benefit The Arts Center 

An Evening In Monte Carlo: An Artistic Affair 



By Dan Goldblatt 
SpecUaXoTheSun 
iTWlien the Vir|inia 
VBeacb Arts Center jkmoi- 
' ts "An Evening in Monte 
Carlo," on Saturday, 
Nov. 6, at 9 p.m., at the 
Old Cavalier on the Hill, it 
is certain to be an artistic 
affair. Proceeds from the 
evening will benefit the 
Arts Center. 

The formal (black tie) 
affair will capture the 
romantic elegance of one 
of the world's best known 
resort cities in Monaco. 
The main floor of Virginia 
Beach's oldest hotel, 
which has been the 



lodging choice of hCads- 
of-state from all over the 
world, will be transformed 
into a "palais royal" for 
the event. 

The entire atmosphere 
will lend itself to the motif 
of the famed city on the 
French Riviera. A door- 
man and valet parking are 
but two features that will 
welcome guests to "An 
Evening in Monte Carlo." 

"We have been very 
careful to detail our plan- 
ning in all areas to add 
authenticity to our 
theme." said Amelia 
Green, Chairperson of the 
Monte Carolo Committee. 



I ! ! IBEAT INFLATION ! 1 1 1 

WHY PAY AN EMPLOYEE? WHEN WE 

CAN DO IT ALL FOR YOU. AND MORE! 

RENT A FURNKHED OFFICE 

WITH PHONE. UTILITIES* ANSWERING 
SERVICE. Typing & Bookkeeping Service Available 

SERVICE PROFESSIONALS, LTD^ 

Siilte-4-2006OW Greenbrier Rd. 424-5M0 



"Some of the very finest 
modern art has been 
donated to help suj^ort 
the affair, a "Modern 
Art" show of ladies ap- 
parel will be given by 
Miller and Rhoads and 
Connie Parker and Com- 
pany-a fabulous young 
jazz singer, will enter- 
tain," she continued. 

But perhaps the most 
authentic element of all 
for the evening will be 
when an actual trip to 
Monte Carlo is given away 
to a fortunate couple. 
Also, recognized, local ar- 
tists have donated selec- 
tions of their works to 
benefit the Arts Center. 
Included in the group of 
donors are Skippy Ander- 
son, Karen and Jim 
Chalkley, Vonnie Whit- 
worth, Suzanne Stevens, 
Laney Oxman, Norman 
Goodwin and Joseph 
Craig English. The 
fashion show is being 
coordinated by Pat Young 
of Miller and Rhoads and 
features a variety of for- 
mal wear and furs prior to 




A.D. and D's 






Sat., Nov. 27»Smurf Day 

Show us anything with a Smurf on it and get in FREE! 

If yeu don't have a Smurf. buy one at the rink for • 1 .50 and use it 

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. session ONLY 




%^ ./< 



Acoustical Lounge 

371 Independence Blvd. 
Across 

From Sears 



Open Daily 

1 1 am- 2 am 

Lunch Specials 



Live Entertainment 
9pm-l am 



Happy Hour From 4 PM - 7 PM 

$1 .00 Off Specials &Entrccs 

With This Ad 

Catering Too 497-1305 




an unveiling of the new 
diagonal shapes in dresses, 
with the focus on sweatcr- 
typekhltt. 

Ent«1ainment for "An 
Evening in Monte Carlo" 
has a load flavor, Connie 
Parker and Company are 
Virginia Beach's peremier 
jazz group and have 
I^yed at top nightclubs 
throughout the city. 
Parker got her start seven 
years ago at the Holiday 
Inn Midtown in Norfolk 
and has since shared a 
stage with Count Basic, 
Donald Byrd, Noel Poin- 
ter and musicians who 
play for Ella Fitzgerald. 
Parker is an up and 
coming talent who has 
been likened to Nacy 
Wilson, Sarah Vaughan 
and Carmen McRae. 

A $50 per person 
donation is asked to 
benefit the Virginia Beach 
Arts Center. It is hoped 
that all reservations are in 
by Nov. 3. For infor- 
mation and reservations, 
call the Arts Center at 425- 
0000. 



Stamps 
At The 
Pavilion 



TTie Virginia Philatelic 
Federation will host 
"VAPEX *82," Nov. 12 
through 14, at the 
Cavalier Hotel. 42nd 
^raet aad the waterfront. 

VAPEX '82 is an 
exhibit conusting of ^X) 
fraoiet of stamps and 
otto Phil^^; items as 
w^ as 24 deaters. There 
wUl be a rtmp auction 
VMk^ evfiilflv. Nov. 12. 
(M DomfaifoD Sales Ser- 
vices wiU be the auc- 
tionacri. Admission is 
f^. 

Vm inlM^itton about 
VAPEX 'S2 aad hotel 
re^rvirttoB ^rds, write 
VAPEX '82, P. O. Box 
S6U, l<tof<rfk, Virginia 
23SI«. 



/ 



M 



6 Viiiiiiia Beadi Sun. l^vonber 3. 1982 



^^mmi^^ 



Hish School Sports/Politics 



X 



Eastern District 



First Colonial Vies For District Title 



By WALTER LAUGHON 

Although Uk Beach IX^rict duuniMon has already 
been detamlned. Be^di teams will decide the winner of 
the Eastern District this week. First Colonial, the num- 
ber one ranked team in the state, meets Lake Taylor 
who leads the Eastern Di^rict. Norview, the only team 
that can catdi Lake TaykM- also pla^ a Besaii District 
team when they host Kempsville. Konpsville is in a 
three way tie few secoi^ {riace in the Beach District. 
Booker T., who was in the Easton I^strict race until 
they were beatoi by Cox last week also plays a Beach 
team this week when they meet KeUam. Green Run 
travels to McLean ami the only game pitting two Beach 
foes is Bayside at Princess Anne. 

Last week this reporter went 4-2 to run the season 
totals to 22-6. This is the last week of the season and 
this reporter will try and improve on his season totals. 



Kempsville (6-3) At 
Norview (6-3) 

Kempsville 27-Norview 12 



Kempsville is coming off a big win last week over 
Green Run and Norview is coming off a 28-0 thrashing 
of Bayside. Norview has to win this game and hope that 
First Colonial beats Lake Taylor in order to win the 
Eastern District Title. Two of KempsviUes losses have 
been to the number one and number three ranked teams 
in the state and their otba loss was a close decision to a 
fine Cox squad. Many people have said that Norview 
has one of the easiest schedules in Tidewater this year. 
Coach Ralph Gahagan has said that he was somewhat 
disappointed in his teams play early in the season, but 
the Chiefs are coming off one of their best games of the 
season last week. 

The Chiefs have one of the most potent offenses in 
Tidewater ranking second in points scored and third in 
total offense in Tidewater. The Chiefs offense is led by 
their outstanding nmning back D.J. Dozier who went 
over the 1,000 yard rushing mark in last weeks win over 
Green Run. The Chiefs also have one of the best quar- 
•erbacks in the district in Matt Hudgins. giving the 
Chiefs one of the best one-two punches in the district. 
The Chiefs defense has had its troubles this year but put 
it all together last week, limiting Green Run to only 167 
total yard, their lownt of the season. Coach Gahagan 
credited the defense with the victory, saing it was thdr 
best effort of the season. 

Kempsville will have little trouble scoring and if their 
defense plays as well as it did last week, they should 
limit Norviews scoring. Norview should be UP for this 
game, knowing they have to win to have a chance at the 
District Title. However the Chiefs should have to much 
fire power for Norview and unless they are flat for this 
game they should have little trouble beating the Pilots. 



First Colonial (9-0) At 
Lake Taylor (6-2-1) 

First Colonial 27-Lake Taylor 17 

This game matches the top teams in their respective 
districts. First Colonial alrouiy wiiming their IXstrict 
Title and Lake Taylor leading their Distrct. Lake 
Taylor needs to either win this game or have Kempsvilte 
beat Norview to win the Eastern District Title. Last 
week Lake Taylor crushed Beach District PriiKxss Aniw 
42-0 and First Colonial crushed Eastern I^trict team 
Maury 45-14. First Colonial is the number <mt ranked 
team in the state and would love to eiKl the season with a 
perfect record. These two teams could meet again in the 
regional playoffs and this could be a preview of that 
game. 

First Colonial leads all TukrwMa schools in pmnts 
scored and ranks among the leader in most oHoisive 
catagories. Despite its poor (fefensive statiAics, tlw 
Patriots have a fine defowve squad, TIm Patri<Ms also 
have perhaps the bat aU-annuid piajwr in Ttdewaus in 
Will Forbes. Forb« leads aQ nmooi in Tidewater in 
rushing aiKi scoring. ,Ib Uat weeks victory, Forbes 
rush«l for 20S yards on only 7 carries and scored three 
T.D.s. Forbes i also an outstandmg kick returner and 
l^ys an excdlent (kfaistve game. 



First Coioniars Will Forbes 



First Colonial is well deserving of its numb« oat 
ranking and will be out to keep that ranking. Lake 
Taylor has wtm six stral^t ganoes capped off by last 
weeks 42-0 pasting and have the momentium going into 
this final r^ular season game. This should be a real 
bam4>uma- with b<^ teams putting a lot of pcmits of 
the board. This repwter feels that First Colonial will 
show just why they are the numba one ranked team in 
Virginia by bating Lake Taylor . 



Bayside (1-8) At 
Princess Anne (3-6) 

Princess Anne 27-Bayside 14 



Princess Anne has to be the biggest disappointmoit of 
the season. After being picked to win the Beach 
District, P.A. finds it has to win this game in order mrt 
to finish in the cellar. Both P.A. and Bayside have yet 
to win a game in the district this year so this game is to 
see who finishes the year without a victory in tlw 
district. It would be a fitting finish to the season if this 
game ended in a tie. 

P.A. has \osi three games in a row due mainly to the 
ineffectiveness of the offense. They have been shutout 
in two of their last three games and have been on again- 
off-again all year. The P.A. defense has yet to hold a 
team under double figures this year and have allowed a 
total of 226 points in 9 games. Bayside has had trouble 
offensively and defensively this srason. The Marlins 
have scored a total of only 34 points in their 9 games 
and have been shutout in their last two games. The 
defense has given up 242 points the worst in the district. 
Bayside 's linemen are small and continue to get blown 
off the line of scrinunage in every game they have 
played. j :■ t ; yi 



Despite P.A. poor season they would like to salvage 
some of ther pride by beating Bayside and winning their 
first game in the district. P.A. should be a heavy 
favorite in this game but Bayside would love to pull an 
upset in this one. P.A. poor season they would like to 
salvage some of their pride by beating BiQrside and win- 
nii^ their first game in the district. P.A. should be a 
heavy favorite in this game but Bayside would love to 
pull an upset in this one. P.A. will be out to aven^ laA 
weeks embarerassing loss to Lake Taylor and shcrid win 
this game handily. However tho-e has beat m<»e th«i 
one game this year that P.A. should have won that they 
didn't, (»uld this be one more? 



Booker T. Washington (4-4-1) 
At Kellam (3-6) 

BookerT. 31-Kellaml4 

Last week BookCT T. was knocked out of the Eastern 
District race when they lost to Cox. After beating P.A., 
shuting them mit. KeUam has lott its last two games. 
Booker T. should be (nit to avoige last weeks lou and 
that could be bad news for Kdlam. Kellam would like 
to give the home crowd a vi^ory in their fimd ganM of 
the season. Booker T. will also be trying to aid the 
season with a wituiing record, thus giving them double 
incentive for this gaoM. 



Afto^ scoring 20 p<Mnts against Cox. Kdlam was shut 
(Hit last week by Giiuiby, a team that had won only one 
IM-evious gaoM. The Knights have been up one game 
and down the next, both offensii^ aiM) defoidvely all 
year. They will have to have nm «ily a fine offensive 
game but a fiiK defenave game as wdl if they iK^e to 
uDset Booker T. 



Booker T. will be trying to oKi tlK seasm on a win- 
ning nc^ and finish the season with a winai^ record. 
Kellam can only look forward to next ytas and hope to 
end the seteoa with an ufMct. BocAct T hat too andi 
fire-iwwcr for the Km^ts and riiorid be iq> f or thn 
game, winning it handily. 



Virginia Beach Sun Player Of The Week 



FOTtteseomd 






. WiU Forbes of First *aO of Tidewater. 



Ccrfcmial, hia been mkaeted Pta^-of-tte-we^ by the 
Va. Be^ Sea. L«^« hu team to a cn^n^ 4S-14 
victc^ cNct ktany, Parixi raked fm "XiS yards deqxte 
csryi^ the bd m^ mym ttecs, tiutt «mdcs out to an 
avCT^e of iteo« 30 jvnb per ovry. Fates ^o 
KtMed thrw ttnehdon^ boo^i Us season pmnt toMd 
to 12ft p(mu, U9S m TldewaWr. Fnrta' 'X5 yadi 
T^aakim 0"^ ^ 1-279 jv^ for tte seasiM, alio tat* 
iaTidewMa. F«bes, wte w» averaging 9.3 jnvA per 
carry. cCT^^ teRHKi teH ttHL. and tkM A 



WiB Fo^ci tt ptdbMs die bc« tf-«oud fooOall 
piajwr m ndemter. h tA&H&omUi %b ewtitindtai nm- 
mm, Foites abo retatm Udks md ptajrs omrtanding 
drfe»e. If there <i^ a l^toaa Ttc^ m ^^ adiool 
f oocb^ wa Fofttes wodd be a ^M>« to wte k. 



Wifl PMMi is tte aKist tjosUm fooOii p^rer to 
cMit of tiUs aiea io iOBw dHc Mi in reoog^icMi of 




Fdtowtag the wckoari^ remarks the tkni stndent speaker was JoUe Gutafsoa. 



PoMcs At First Colonial 

Parents aiKl city officials recently met at Pint 
Colonial High Sdiool for a National/Student 
Parent Mock Election. 

Welcoming remarks wa-e delivered by Trae 
Jennings, son of Coundlman Jack Jennings, 
followed by studoit speakers Julie Gustafson, 
Brennan Murphy, Jim Rittmhoux and Candi 
Jenks. 

Guest speakers for the evening included two for 
Republican Paul S. Tribk and two for Democrat 
Richard J. Davis. Both men are seeking a seat in 
the U.S. Senate. Speaking for Trible was Vu-ginia 
Beach Senator A. Josq>h Canada, Jr.; and 
Virginia Beach Commonwealth's Attorney, Paul 
Sciortino. Speaking for Davis was Portsmouth 
Education Association President Dr. Marlene 
Hager and Virginia Beach City Councilman Bob 
Jones. 

City officials present at the mock election in- 
cluded. Delegates Glenn McClanan, Owen 
Pickett, and Buster O'Brien; Council members 
Meyera Obemdorf. Jack Jomings. and Butch Kit- 
chin. School officials present included Walter 
Carroll, Brad Bulla, Dr. Andrew Carrington, Dr. 
Fred Benham, Bruce McGuire, and Dr. Thomas 
Garrou. 




ffwDavii. 



TiMc 



Resuhs from the mock dection yielded the 
following results: Davis received 14 students votes 
compared to Trible's 54. Parents voted 54 for 
Davis, 75 for Trible. 

The mock election was sponsored by the 
Teachers Guides to Television Family Institute in 
New York City. 



VIDEO CENTER 




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■ 1 



mmimmmi 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 7 



City Council 



I^irect Election Of Mayor Also Considered 

I Continued from Page 1 

stscted to one percent. 

He said that the pror 
pakal w(nild be less ob- 
je4ti(Hiable if food for 
hclne use were exempted 
frqm the tax. Grochmal 
w^ instructed to bring 
baick before Monday's 
selsion a repcrt on the 

lots in revenues which 
would result by taking the 
ta| off food for home use 
and medicines. Jennings 
cc^ceded that if only the 
additional one cent tax, if 
ap|)roved, were omitted 
fr^m food for home con- 
su|nption and medicine, a 
bdokkeeping nightmare 
would result. 

The city would realize 
approximately $13 million 
in revenues from the add- 
itional cHie percent. 

Jennings said that the 
addltioial tax might work 
a hardship fw seniw citi- 
zens. 

\^ce Mayor Barbara 
Henley said that food and 
medicaticm are usually 
considered together so 
that the loss in revenues 
cm both should be sub- 
mitted to Council. 

Councilman Harold 
Heischober said that "what 
we're trying to say is that 
we want greater latitude 
in taxes." 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Q-eech suggested that 
Council should think 
clearly what items it 
should focus on, 

Grochmal recommend- 
ed only that the city avoid 
proposals that would af- 
fect the General Assembly 
itself. 

Councihnan Jc^n A. 
■Baum said the reverse 



also is true. The cities 
would appreciate the Gen- 
eral Assembly's steering 
clear of legislation that is 
primarily a local nmcem. 
QMmcitaian W. H. Kit- 
chin m said that it was 
better to let the Geiwral 
Assembly know what your 
interests are. 

Council last week by 
consensus decided not to 
seek a study of a direct 
election of mayor. Qty 
Attorney Dale Bimson 
pdnted out Monday that 
since this would involve a 
charter change, the city 
first would have to ad- 
vertise for a public hear- 
ing. Jennings had moved 
a study be included in the 
prc^osals with Council- 
woman Meyera Obemdorf 
seccmding his motion. The 
madm was withdrawn 
after a discussion. 

Baum said he didn't 
"know why anyone would 
want an emoticmal public 
hearing such as that and it 
bothers me that a state 
legislator should have 
asked for the change. It's 
easy to stir emotions up. 
What is the improvement 
gdng to be?" 

He said that a direct 
election of a mayor would 
Create more problems. At 
present, he said, a maj- 
ority vote of councU is 
needed to elect a mayor. 
Once elected, the nuiyor 
then has at least majority 
support. What the city 
needs is team work while 
a direct election will keep 
things stirred up long 
after the election. Also, he 
said, if Council gives up 
that power, to elect the 



mayor, it's giving up one 
mwe power "and we're 
not too powerful." 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
said that direct election 
was "Suggested by one 
state senator (Joseph 
Canada) and to my know- 
ledge he has never written 

a letter to Council asking 
for our opinion." Del. 
Qenn McQanan, aa the 
other hand, has sought 
Council's attitudes. He 
said that the senator's 
actions were discourteous 
to the Council. "I hate to 

see the mayor a loner and 
possibly that can happen. 
It's impatant the mayo- 
has the suppot of Council 
and I hate to see a sit- 
uation occur where the 
chair would not have the 
majority support." 

Jennings said that he 
thought J(mes was doing 
an outstanding job as 
mayor, but that "we hear 
so much about this that 



I'd like to see the matter 
put to rest once and for 
all... To pretend it doesn't 
exist is as bad an error as 
coning up with the decis- 
ion... I merely want to get 
the matter on the floor." 
Vice Mayor Henley said 
that she suppwted direct 
electiwi two years ago and 
she still basically agrees 
with the COTicept. How- 
ever, she said, she has 
de\eloped mixed emot- 
ions. 

Her c<xicems arc in the 
perceptions the public has 
of the mayor. If the public 
ties a direct election with 
a strraig mayor, she is 
:^po8ed. She said she 

supported the council- 
manager form of govern- 
ment. 

Baum said that the last 
time the question came 
up, no one came up with a 
simple way to elect the 
mayor under the city's 7-4 
system-seven members 
representing the bcx-o- 
ughs and four at large. 




Chomng Down 



Vkt Mtayor 9vhm Htriey (cwter) wti Ctmrnt^rnvrnm M«y«ni OI>«r«Awf Jotort Sj^ ^^''l^ 
P«Wic Rckitioas Dinctor Pccgy Staiw (left) ia Jvdgiiq H«aow««i cakw Im« we«k ai FaMIrM MqmMI| 
Cciiler. Tke wtaaer was Mary Qukk of f4oB HaM. 



Beach Selling Millions In Bonds To Finance 



The aty of Vuginla 
Beach will sell 
$19,095,000 in 1982 char- 
ter bonds and $7.3 million 
in 1982 and 1983 double 
barrel water and sewer 
bonds to finance projects 



in the five-year Capital 
Improvement Program 
(CIP) approved by City 
Council Mcxiday after- 
noon. 

The charter bonds are 
for first year projects in 



Council Cancels Christmas Meeting 



Virginia Beach Qty Council 
cancelled the Dec 27th meeting. 



MtMiday afternoon 



the 1982-87 CIP while the 
water and sewer boids 
are for the first and 
second year projects in 
the CIP. 

In addition, another 
$6,241,346 in revenue 

sharing funds will be used 
for engineering and high- 
ways, buildings, and 
parks and recreation. 
Council unanimously 



authorized the bcmd sales. 
However, the resduticm ' 
to approve the entire CIP 
calling for a $393 million 
expenditure over five 
years lacked cme vote fcv 
unanimity. Councilman 
Jack Jennings dissented 
because he had scxne 

reservations ab<Hit pro- 
jects Usted. 
Changes in the first 




—BRUCE SAYS: TAKE 
ADVANTAGE OF THIS 



;,t: c^^. -i^i. 



SPECIAL SALE! 



PfffCf 



IIDI 



THROUGH NOVEMBER 30, 1982 



BRUCE BROWN 




What about erection 
and concrete? 

We can do it, you can 
do it, or we can 
do it together. 

Ask about our self- 
erection package. 



CAUCOiUCT 

OnKEs91«-m-l116 
H<mi: 919-398-S342 



SLOPE WALL 

1_ 40x75x14 In COLOR 
1— 20' X 13' door 
6 — LitePonls 
F.O. B.PLANT 

LIST PRICE SnCIAL 

$12,646. PRKi 

1_48x50xl4GALVALUME 
1— 24' X 13' door 
4 — Litefonls 
F.O. B. PUNT 
LIST PRICE SfKIAL 

$10,329. WICf 



STRAIGHT WALL 



I 



^8820. 

PLUS TAX 



$7204. 

PLUS TAX 



l--36x50xl41n COLOR 
1—18'^ 13' door 
4 — LitePonls 
F.O.B. PtANT 

LIST PRICE SPfCIAl 

$9934) PRtCi 

l_24x25xlOGALVALUME 
l_12'x9'door 
2 — LitePonls 
F.O.B. PLANT 

LIST PRICE 
$3552. 



^6926. 

PLUS TAX 



SPCCfAl 

PRta 



^478. 

PLUS TAX 



I^M 






flf^P^M 



Frtight, •' actiw and cof^rtte must be 
od(M to these prices. 

REVELLE 

tILtPHONI 919-388-311t 



MURFREESBORO. NORTH CAROLIN., „/8E 




OtiMr Shti AyiMili 

Our buildings include lite 
panis (many others do rrat.) 
Our buildir^s irKlude big 
double slide d(K>rs (many 
others do not.) 



year budget initially pre- 
sented by Qty Manager 
Thcxnas H. Muehlenbeck 
reflected input fi"(Mn citi- 
zens at a public hearing 
and fi-om CouncU mem- 
bers; Among the Revenue 
Sharing listings, Provi- 
dence Road, Phase V was 

deleted ($4%,g00), and 
Ferrell Parkway Phase IV 
($375,000) moved up in its 



place. Also added were 
c(xnputerized TVaffic A 
Signal Expansion 
($66,800) which had not 
been scheduled until 
1986-87, and Fanner's 
market parking ($55,000) 
which had been listed 
amcxig projects requested 
but not funded. 
Oianges in the charter 

See COUNCIL, Page 15 



Citizens Study Federal Impact 

Tlie' CStizeas Cemmittee '«udyinf the impact rfj^^ij 
Federal and State legislaticm on localities has been ^ 
increased frran five to seven members at the request <rf 
Councihnan Robert G. Joies who serves as chairman. 

Members appdnted to the committee Monday 
afternoon by Qty Council include Robert Lowe, 
Channing Tseifl)er, Edwin link, Richard Kline, Dr. 
Clarence Holland and Donald Rhodes. 



ASAP In Virginia Beach 



Tidewater Virginia 
Alcdid Safety Actirai Pro- 
gram (TVASAIO is being 
established in Virginia 
Beach Traffic Court. 

Virginia Beach foTnerly 
used the ASAP office in 
the Norfolk Traffic Court 
but an increase in driving 



under the influence (DUI) 
arrests at the Beach has 
given the city the dubious 
privilege of having its own 
ASAP office. 

Qty Council Monday 
afternoon appropriated 
$7,000 to set up the office. 



Scouts Replace Widow's Flag 



Virginia Beach Boy 
Scout Troop 436 will hold 
a Veteran's Day Program 
on Thursday, Nov. 11 
beginning at 8 a.m. 
Location will be at 441 W. 
Farmington Road in the 
Point O' Woods section of 
Virgnia Beach. 

At the ceremony a flag, 
which has flown over the 
State Capitol, will be 
presented to the widow of 
late John Seredynski. He 
was a retired naval offlcer 



and school teacher. He 
was active in church and a 
member of the Point-O- 
Woods Civic League. On 
the day of his funeral 

someone stole the flag 
from the family flagstaff. 
The scouts decided to 

present a new flag to the 
family on Veterans day. 
The flag to be donated 
was obtained by Congress- 
man G. William White- 
hurst. 



Beta Sigma Phi Meeting 



Members of Alpha Xi 
of BeU Sigma Phi will 
meet at the home of Nan- 
cy Fasteson, 5516 
Carolanne Terrace, on 
Thursday, Nov. 4 at 7:30 
p.m. 

Final details will be 
given on the mystery din- 
ner planned for Uie sisto- 
chapter social on Nov. 9. 



After the business 
meeting, a cultural 
program will be presented 
on child protection. The 
guest speaker will be Jill 
Lake of the Social Services 
Bureau. 

CaU 499-3S67 or 486- 
1764 for more infor- 
mation. 



DR. ROBERT THOMA^ 

AND 

DR. WILLIAM HOLCX>MB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

SpcciaUring in Fwnily ViMon Analyst 
ConUct Lens, Extended Wear Soft Leas 
& Children's Vision 
1194 S. LynnhaireB Parkway 



p»»w 



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Tires for Lcn 



^ ImMeifO Th^e 



3806 Bainbrid^ Blvd. 
Chesapeake, VA 23324 

New-Used & Recap Tfafes 

FREE 



RfliT^ 



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Alignment Only 12*' 

Cd 
545-21)26 




Game 3) Brown at William & Ntery 



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Game 4) North Carolina at Oemsoo 



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Game S) Wake Forest at Duke 



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Game 6) Florida at Georgia 




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Game 7) James Madton at Furman 



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,33XJiiique Shops To 
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Auction Saturday 7:30 pm 

4576 l-Pembroke 

Pembroke Mall 



Game 9) Houston at Texas 



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Auto Graphics 




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' • Sun Roofs 

• Luggage Racks 

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Wholesal&& Retail 

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Phone: 420-0127 



Game 10) Michigan at Illinois 




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Heating and Air Conditioning 

Heating 

Rq)airs & Rq>lacemeiit 



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Game 1 1) MarshaU at V.M.I. 



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Game 1 3) Northwestern at Michigan St. 




THE BREAKFAST 
SHOPPE 

Grade "A" and "Prima" Food Mi 
at ito Bast 24 Hours a Day! 

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ANYTIME 

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ClKsapeake 



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GaoM 14) Notre Dame at Pittsburg 



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Game 15) lo^ at Pvdue 



FOOTBALL CX)NTEST SPONSORS • ENTER AND WIK CASH! ! ! 



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Game 8) Virginia at Georgia Tech 



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Game 16) Florida St. at South CaroUna 




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/ 



^■^ 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 9 



Bob Harmon Forecasts Week's College Games -| 



I To give you an idea of the frustrations of fiaUowing 
tiMl forecasting the fantastic ficlde finals of "fun-filled" 
football week after week, here are the results oi two 
li^emes of weekly picking. One of our poorest 
Saturdays in recent memory was October 9th: 123 right, 
t2 wrong, for an unexciting .705 average. (We're sure 
^ 32 underdogs won!) However, just one week later, 
in October 16th, the entire picture was reversed with a 
Mppy .803 average. We had 143 winners, only 33 
Jloiers. Fascinating! 

» 
I 
^ Notre Dame has the dubious distinction on succes- 

ii\t Saturdays of engaging the "Perils of Peniuyl- 

fania," namely Pittsburgh and Penn State. Powerftil 

Hu a the first obstacle. And though the Irish have a 

leptttation for upsetting undefeated teams plus 

Weakuig lengthy winning streaks, the Panthers lodk to 

H too formidable. Pitt's at home... and Pitt should be 

the winner. 



Georgia and LS.U. could take big strides within the 
Southeast Conference this week. However, it'll be no 
easy task for either...both play on the road. LS.U. is an 
aiMlerdog to Alabama in Birmingham and Georgia is a 
lUght favorite over Florida in Jacksonville. 

i 

I And the race in the Atlantic Coast Conference heats 
^p considerably as Qemson entertains North Cardina. 
the Tigers, on their way to both a conference 
diampionship and a natioiud championship last fidl, 
lust edged the Tar Heels 10-8. In preparati<m this year, 
Oemson had the week off last Saturday while North 
Carolina hosted Maryland. The winner in this 

dne... North Carolina. 

J 
I 

t 



Pac-lO rivals U.CLA. and Washingtm meet in 
Seattle in what will be the first of a three-g une suicide 
run for the Bruins. Stanford and Southern (Ilal fdlow in 
order. Eveittual supremacy of the omference rides 
heavily oo tbe outcome of this contest, but the Huskies 
still have to make that trip to Arizona State. The power 
quotients give the edge to U.CLA. 



MAJOR COLLEGES 

Air Force 27 - Army 10 
Alabaiiia21-L.S.U.13 
ArlzoM Sttte 40-Oregon State 6 
Arizona 24-Staiif ord 21 
Ariuufsas State 24-Lamar 6 
Ariuuisaa 34-Bftyior 7 
Auburn 28-Rotgers 14 

Bostoa College 3S-Ma8sachiisetts 
Bowling Green 23-BaU State 13 
Brigham Young ^-Wyoming 13 
Brown 21-William ft Mary 19 

Central Michigan 21-Mianii (Ohio) 20 

Colgate 25-Penn8ylvania 17 

Colorado State 20-Nevada-Las Vegas 10 

Dartmouth 21-Columbia 10 

Duke 27-Wake Forest 20 

East Carolina 24-Texas-Arlington 14 



Florida State 27-South Carolina 14 
Fresno State 26-Cal-Fullerton 13 
Furman 33-James Madison 13 

Georgia Tech 27- Virginia 16 
Georgia 21-Florida 14 
Hawaii 23-San Diego State 20 
Holy Cross 22-Harvard 14 
Iowa State 28-Kansas 13 
Iowa 22-Purdue 20 

Kent State 17-Eastern Michigan 12 
Lafayette 30-Princeton 13 
Long Beach State 26-Pacific 20 
Louisianna Tech 21-McNeese 9 
Louisville 22-Indiana State 21 

Maryland 24-Mianii, Fla. 20 
Michigan State 31-Northwestern 13 
Michigan 28-Illinois 20 
Mississippi 23-Tulane 14 
Missouri 21-Colorado 7 
Moorhead State 24-Illinois State 23 

Navy 21-Syracu^e 16 
Nebraslca 40-Olclahoma State 7 
New Mexico 37-Texas-EI Paso 7 
North Carolina 23-Clenison 17 
North Texas 20-New Mexico State 17 
NE Louisianna 26-SW Louisianna 17 



Ohio State 26-Minnesota 14 
Ohio 22-Northem Illinois 13 
OUahoma 24-Kansas State 17 
Oregon 23-Washington State 21 
Penn State 28-No. Carolina State 7 
Pittsburgh 20-Notre Dame 7 

San Jose State 33-Santa Clara 7 
Southern CaUf . 30-Califomia 7 
S.M.U.33-RiceO 

Tenn.-Chattonooga 28-Appalachian State 15 

Tennessee 26-Memphis State 10 

Texas Tech 23-T.C.U. 22 

Texas 21-Hou8ton 17 

Toledo 24-Western Michigan 22 

Tuba 27-West Texas 12 

U.C.L.A. 27-Washington 24 
Utah 21-Utah State 12 

Vanderbilt 23-Kentucky 10 
V.M.I. 20-MarshaU 13 

West Virginia 20-Temple 14 

Western Carolina 24-The Citadel 10 

Wichita 24-Drake 13 

Wisconsin 27-Indiana 21 / 

Yale 24-Comell 12 







Guess the Winning Teams! 



Sun Prognosticators 

Brown Widens Lead, 
Barba Forfeits All Games 

bi a bizzare turn of events. Killer K«w Bwba 
forfeited all twenty games in thi» past weelwndi contest 
when she fiuled to turn in her predictions. Since that 
left only Bashful Brown and Lean and Mean Uughon 
with predictions, Laughon is now in second plMC, white 
Brown extended his lead to eleven games. 

In the games played last weekend, BashfUl ftrown 
correctly picked sixteen out of twenty games. Laughon 
went thirteen and seven and, unfortunately, Barba 
went Mro for twenty, h was a sad turn of events in their 
(^jntest as the race for first place had been tight all 
season. 

After eight weeks of competition Brown is In first 
place with a record of 112 wins and 48 defeats for a 
percentage <rf TW: Eleven games teck is our new 
runiwr-up, Walter Ui^tan with a rewjrd c< 101 and 59 
(« *), and Killer Barba is in the basement with mi 
overall record of 91 and 69 (57%). 

It seems now that with only four weeks left. Bashful 
Brown can make the safe pfcks and should coast to the 
"feague chamirionship" am(^ tlM Sun's Pr(«iMite- 
ators. With the exception of this past week's per- 
formance. Killer Karen Barba could still get back m the 
thick of battle, as she tes usw^ done weU on her 
prcgnostteaUons. But, Uan and Mem Laufhon, ww 
^M he H finiOly out of the celtar, wU figin hard Mt to 
sUde back into the depths of the basement. 

Ihere wiU be some stvy htterestii« games phi«d 
t^ upeonrfm wecheMl tlut %hXKM |«ovkte {^a^ ol 
exd^nwnt. Key games hi conference ptay tl^ weak 
ai« LS.U. at Alabama, North Caroluia at OcnMn. 
M^^M at aUnqiSi and UCLA at Washing too. rhw 
ttort 9te ftm f gMww M^ wfffJBtirf la afln-^ ^twet 
^y Uhe No^ Hum u Fhtshuivh iHikh stouM be a 
Iw^wner, Air Foi^ at Amy. mmk ffla.) at 
Mvytand a^ erf kical iaunst. Brown M ^^ta» ad 
Mary, James MmUsom at Fuiman, Virginia M Georgia 
Tech Md M^teU at V.M.I. 



Last Weeks Winners 



1st Place 

Bill Skaggs 
5104 Janet Dr. 
Virginia Beach 



To enter, just check each sponsor on the preceding 
page and find the game. A different game for each 
sponsor plus a tie-br«ker. Write down the name of the 
team you think will win that game in the appropriate 
space and the business advertiser's name in which that 
gune is located. Failure to write both in the correct 
spzce wiM be dfclnrert a wrong jiip" Fnter as often as 
you wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision will be final. Entries must be post- 
marked' no later than 12 noon on Saturday. 




2nd Place 

Robert Dunning 
1005 Decatur St. 
Chesapeake 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM l"mii'Hli'l'l>'l'i«l'i 



! YOUR NAME 



ADDRESS. 



GAME WINNER 



BUSINESS ADVEi^rBER 



j (GaaieZ) 
I (GaaM3) 



(Gawe4) 
(GasMS) 



I 



<GnMO 



i CGaawT) 



GAMEWINNOt 



CITY. 



.PHONE. 



BUSINESS ADVERTISER 



(Game 11) 



(Game 12) 



(Game 13) 



(Game 14) 



(GaHM 15) 



(Game 16) 



(GmMlT) 



iO 



« 



!») 



(GmmVM 



WImmr ef ||ft ocrtMcalH 
I mm Mil— iMWl mt of 



(Gamelg) 



(GMM19) 



:Gamc20) 



HE WEAKER: Pkk ttae 
total number of poii^ scored 
tQ' : Oklahoma St. at Nebraska, 



TOTAL 



MAILfKTIIYTO: 



FDOd»BCan^^ 
P.O. Bo9t 1327 




/ 



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TTS" 



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tmf 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 

lliiiittnuiinuiiiNHtiimiuiitttiiyiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiiHMHwi 

r. * T,.rnnt^' 3. Primitive Aft CWtef» Showing 430-3248 

Events TO Lome. Woodstock CHft Home (tee map) pet. 31 - Nov. 6 

1. Countryside Christnuu Market 427-9009 4. Woodstock Open Home 420-3248 
Va. Beach Pavilion, Nov. 27 ft 28 (See Map) Nov. 7 

2. Comer Cottage Open House 4:M)-6S65 3. Jordan's Country apwC^n House 467-3083 
(See Map) Nov. 14 (See Map) Nov. 7 




niin«iuiiiiuMmiMiiiiiunMiiiiiiimMHfNiiiuiM»Niwiiw« 

6. Mtrche* Craft Show 497-6235 
Pembroke MaU, Nov. 11, 12ft ll 

7. Grandma's Attic Open House 468-1002 
(See Map), Nov. 14 




w- 



f'.'^t.- 



Guide To Virginia Beach 

e o t Id 1. e T I E) IdEgT 

ARTgT & CRAFTef 
AMTIQUBef 



Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 





Countryside QuitfiiQas 

Oxmtryside Shops is spOQSorifig t dountrysi(te 
Christmas Market at the Pavilion on Nowettber 27 
and 28 featuring many of the finest yraftipeople 
and artists in the area. 

Local merchants will also be repretemed in a 
spedal heyday section. 

Support your local artists and craftspeople for 
Christmas giving I 




'','■'■■' 



-rCOUNTRY HERITAGE] 

— 973 Providence Square 
Center. 



Everything to warm up the at- 
mothert of your home from 
Handcrafted Country Fur- 
niture with Hand Carved 
Panels A Designs and Hand 
Rubbed Oil Finishes (made in 
th* North Georgia Mountains}. 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches. Trunks. Decoys. Folk 
Art. Mirrors, Sconces. Tins. 
Handmade Baskets. Weather- 
vwies. Wooden Toys. Country 
Kitchenware. Oak Tables and 
Chairs. 




viSSalfUiLJfe^cH g^ 



XSt±4^ 






"Woodstock House For 
Your Country Home." Choose 
from a vast selection of 
Calicos, Custom made cur- 
taita. Country pine furniture 
A accessories for every room. 
Oil and Electric Lamps. 
Primitive Iritis and Folk Arts. 

420-3248 



I ATTIC, INC. 

70 Holland Lakes 
Shopfring Center 




THE jPI^EI^OCMfE 

3478 Holtend Lakes 
Shogjai Centei;^- 



"WehaveewytkiHg to 'coun- 
trifyi' your kemt." Such of 
CiMm-Ahnk Curtaiiu. Knt 
FUndture, Kerotmi Lampt. 
C^ko A Luce, Baskm, Rib- 
b<m$i Hand 0^f*d Qaidles, 
Floral ArrgtigemeHtt. 
Bathroom PIxtum. Fnmts. 
CouHtiy MUdten. Orl^nd Ar- 
twork by Jockk. 15 Room 
Fluttifhhrchaadbe. 





JX)RNEB COTTAGE — 

-60^ Indian River Court_;, 



We have the "Heirtooms of 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Fr^ndly Atmosphere. We 
cary the Xavkr Robals Adop- 
dOH Babies and bam oar own 
Fhr^De^mr. Abo we carry 
Hand Dipped Candles, 
tmiiamslmrg Arrangements, 
Ori^aal Artwork by Bogft, 
speciali ze th MMc Boxas, New 
B^kmd CModks. &m CM^ms. 
Udque Ra^le Ba^ceO, Nor- 
man Rockwell ngurlnes. 




'*»!^;^ 



*b^a 



Once dure you wU Jliti « 
u^M aOeakm iff Fo& An, 
OnmUi WaM, PrbaUv* Ma- 
tiagM. S^uig* Wm, Oitf 
FatMoMd T^dy Bmn, 
Batkeu »on Bkdk Ski*tr 
Ri^froA^^knu, IVt Qtrtrin, 
UplH>lft»rad PurnUuff atd 
Hatd-To-Plmd Coiuttry Item. 




::the lady rEDMJs 

FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA. BEACH 



.4*:^ 



you wUh timae ^eiM touches 
bi yew cookiag with a wide 
wrtety of prices, herbi, teas, 
JOKB mid Hwre. Weakohave 
aat^ma. hm^mde wit^m 
0bm corns, mitii # loee^ 
Imnd-tUpped camUii, i^bms, 
custom bow§, flowar 



t^t and 
JSmy. 
427-9454 



ISdAt) 



Cg^miHg f wy fecial aMec- 
dom diboetiAm md Cmfb 
m »eK ia CdtlmMm md An- 
dfota in a- Wim^Cmmtry 
lime Ammpkmi AtoA' 
M(W« jMwfit Cemky fb-- 

Aftik Pofttiy, Otfvod.wwBffi, 
aikm ml Qiimbit Supples. 
Chnkmi ^tiitatmm. Hobs, 
^a$, 'Mk Aio^m ^itd 
C#gM^ Simdl &aftt«id 



1. TteW^^me Latch 

2. Gmdnui's At^, Inc. 



3. CountrywteSK^ 

4. Jordw'sCm^vy Shops 



Imartk swam by 



5. Canary I^ritage 

6. Cor^Cotta^ 



7. Woodftock Home 

8. MouQtainCrMti 

9. the Lady] 



/ 



immmmmKmmmmmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 1 1 



School And College Hews 



l::i' 



iiiii 

Iff 



Is; 



1' '■ 



K- 



ill* 



42-0 Loss Does Not Deter Princess Anne Spirits 



Swallow Is Named 1982 Homecoming Queen 



Denise Swallow has hten namtd Prtneesa Aniu Hgh 
School HamteonUng Qutn for 1992-4i. Escorted by 
her father, James R. SwaBow, Det^se U the 
commander of the march^ btmd Mfor guardt and Is a 
member of the NatUmd Honor Sodety and the Spadsh 
National Honor Society. 

Ottur serdars In the Honucomb^ Court were: 

linda Wagner, a member of powder pnff football. 
She iws escorted by herfatfur, Arthur Janes Wt^ner. 

lana Dmley, senior doss president, co<aptabi of the 
cheerleaders, and a member of TrMy, Keyettes, and 
Spanish Honor Society. She was escorted by her 
brother, Russell Donley. 

Sonya Jackson, a member ofFBlS, MCO, tmd the 
track tean. She was escorted by HV^m Cherry. 

Tonya Knox, a basketbiM md tennis player, and a 
member ofFBlA and MCO. She was escorted by her 
father, bsac Knox. 

Ann Marte Monaco, eo<aptain of the cheerteathrs 
and a member of the trade team. Sh« wta escorted by 
her fisher, James A. Monaco. 

Jennifer Manlpfl, a member ttf ihe school news- 
paper stt^ff, and a famur membkr r4 the chee^atUng 
squad and tlu gynmasttes Uam. She was escorted by 
herfixther. Matt J. MarshOtt. 

Bepresemlng theJunUtr class wen Christina Deeds, 
Reglmi Ambrose, and Qmdl Camum. 

Representing the sophomore dass were Marjorle 
Dodey and Jennifer NovidekL 



-'MiUW^f 




Jaolor Trey Ford sits on Ice to win P.A.'s "Mr. Cool" contest. Senior winner was 
Alex Jaroslievieii. Sopiiomore winner was Mike Kernels. 




Matthews Is Kellam Queen 

l^ Am Mattfetwi taf ken ^cM 1^ 
HMMConi^ ^MM iU KAMI 8^ Sete<ri tai 



Campbell Receives 
$24 From The Sun 
For the P.A. Band 



Ned Campbell, reprewnting the Princws Amne High 
School Band, recently received a chick for $24 ham 
The Virginia Beach Sun. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Campbell, residents of the Thalia area of 
Virginia Beach. The Prinwss Anne Band has already 
received several ch«;ks for jMutidpating in the Sun Sub- 
s<»ibers campaign. This caraiwign not only gives peo^ 
the oppdrtunlty to become a Sun subscriber but is an «- 
cellent fund raisii^ jwoject for any organization. 

The Priwess AniK Fabulous Marching Cavalie-s 
^^xseA first in their division while rwently competing in 
the Mt. Vernon Invitational Comr«tition. This yews 
heM has approximately 1 10 n^nbers of which 23 are In 
tlw percussion s«:tion. 

Campbell is a member of the percussion group, 
playii^ t\vt snare drum, aiKl is alto foMind in a solo, 
{rtaying the tri-tom drums. At pre^nt he is the drum 
c^itain. During the 1982 season CamptoU was honor^ 
by playing in tlw Sute Band where he earned the 
. p{»kion of fourtii chair, and during Regional Band te 
MM^ tte pMi^n of sewMl cbur. He has plaj^ 
drww for m. y«W, tw© y«« at ThiOia Elementary. 
tiro r^ 9$. ladqxi^mee Junior High School and to 
Mm m tiM weamd ^mt U Priiw^ Anne. 

Campbdl wiys he rradly oijoyi playing tlw drums ai^ 
b^^ ^tft of ttw Fabutottt M«i:ftti« OrniM?. 




Butswinkas In First 



Dane Butswinkas of 
Virginia Beach, a senior at 
James Madiscsi Univer- 
sity, has been named the 
first place speaker at the 
Mointaineer Invitational 
Debate Tournament held 
recently at West Virginia 
University. 

Butswinkas and JMU 
junior Richard Horan also 
won the team competition 



in the varsity division of 
the tournament. 

Individual speaker a- 
wards are given to debat- 
ers who ccwnpile the high- 
est judge's evaluaticm- 
am(Hig a^l ccxnpeting de- 
baters. Forty debaters 
participated in the varsity 
ccxnpetition at the tourna- 
ment. 



Stevenson Enters Carleton 



Donald V. Stevenson, 
the son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Donald V. Stevenson, 
Virginia Beach, entered 



Carleton College in Nor- 
thfield Minn., this fall. He 
is a graduate of First 
Colonial High School. 



Harrington: Nurse Of Year 



CaMipbcH 

Ned CampbcU displays ch«:k to be given to 
the Princess Anne Band 



"A hero is no bra>^ tlwn an ortUaary mu, l»it be is 
ta«veriveauiutehmf».'* Ri^ WiAlo Edoot^mi 



Lor^ta Harrington of 
Virginia Bau:h has been 
chosen at DePaul 
Hospital's outstanding 
t^fisltsmd nurse for 1^2. 

Harrii^pon was tcom^y 
voted ^ the rtaff as the 
"Nii^ W^ Cars" in a 
<K>ntMt wUch MMncide 
with Vl^nia's annual 



"W^k of tte Nurse" ob- 
%rvai^ 

Norfolk resident 
€3uufcac Svinson, a lic^n- 
m& fWK^A nurse, and 
di^apeake rodent Lm 
Pillsbury, a ^nior studrat 
nuiw in D^Mil's School 
of Nursing, were also 
temM-Ml for mitstandii^ 



mmmmmmm 



ms^^^m^ 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 



■MHi 



The Woman's View 




The Choppin3 Block 



How To Cook 
Holiday Goose 

Goose has long been a favorite in Europe for holiday 
dinners and other special occasions, but has only recen- 
tly received attention as a roasting bird in the United 
States. 

The turkey has been the number one holiday roasting 
bird for so long, it seems almost unpatriotic to switch to 
goose. But if you'd Uke to try something different this 
year, a goose will provide a pleasant surprise. 

Goose meat can be dark or light and has a sweet, 
gamey taste. Many prefer it over duck because it's not 
as fatty. 

Most geese in North America come from Canada, but 
they are also raised commercially in small numbers in 
the United States as well. Goose costs almost twice as 
much as turkey ranging in price from $1.30 to $1.50 a 
pound. 

Since geese are usually not available in the local 
supermarket you may have to order one through a but- 
cher. 

The majority of birds are sold frozen and range in size 
from 6 to 14 pounds. You should allow about Vi to V4 
of a pound for each serving. The preparation is similar 
to turkey, except that the fat should be drained off 
periodically as it accumulates. 




Holiday Goose 
With Fruit Dressing 

/ goose, 8 to 10 pounds 
2 tablespoons flour 
I teaspoon salt 
1 teaspoon ginger 



orange segments 

I cup water 

'/t teaspoon pepper 

parsley 




Preheat oven to 350 ° f . \ 

Fill goose cavity loosely with dressing and tie drum- 
sticks together with heavy twine. Place goose, breast 
side up on rack in open shallow roasting pan. Insert 
meat thermometer in thickest part of thigh or breast. 

Roast uncovered until thermometer registers 185" F, 
3 to 4 hours. After 2 hours, drain all fat from pan. 
When Vi done, cut string holding legs. If desired, add 
potatoes to roasting pan at this time. 

Remove goose and cover loosely with aluminum foil; 
let stand 30 minutes before carving. 

Gravy: drain all but 2 tablespoons of fat from 
roasting pan. Place in small saucepan and stir in flour. 
Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until smooth 
and bubbly. Remove from heat. Stir in water, salt, 
pepper, and ginger. Heat to boiling stirring constantly 
for 1 minute. 

Garnish goose with orange segments and parsley. 

Fruit Dressing 
2 tablespoons light cream or milk 
'A cup chopped dried apricots 
Vi teaspoon dried rosemary leaves 
'A teaspoon pepper 

2 cups cracker crumbs V2 cup water 

'A cup finely chopped celery '(] 'easpoon ground sage 
1/4 cup snipped chives '^' pound pork sausage 

2 large apples, unpared, chopped (about 1 'A cups) 
Heat water, apricots, salt, rosemary, sage and pepper in 
3-quart saucepan to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer 3 
minutes. Remove from heat. 

Cook and stir sausage until brown; drain fat. Stir 
sausage and remaining ingredients into apricot mixture. 
Makes about 5 cups. 



Cooking With Wood Good Idea For Cold Months 



Woodburn-ng stoves 
are excellent for cooking 
all-day slews and keeping 
dishes warm before ser- 
ving. To find out what the 
surface temperature is use 
the stove-side ther- 
mometer used to measure 
flue temperatures. 
Another way to tell if the 
stove is hot enough is to 
hold your hand over the 



top. If it doesn't get hot 
within 20 seconds, the 
stove is too cool to cook 
on. 

Of course the season 

will h e a lot to do with 

how 1 the stove gets and 

how ich cooking you 

can on it. Almost 

anyti. i can be cooked on 

the " dstove during the 



Winter but slow-cooking 
dishes are best for Spring 
and Fall. 

Stoves with warming 
areas or attached trivets 
make cooking easier. 
You'll need a supply of 
heavy potholders and a set 
of cast iron pots and uten- 
sils that spread heat 
evenly. 

Time your cooking with 



the firing of the stove. It -I 
best to cook over a fire 
that has reached a steady 
temperature that can be 
depended on for a couple 
of hours. Learn how to 
work the dampers for con- 
trolled heating. 

In woodstove cooking 
patience is often the most 
important virtue. 




^Gift^ 
•Furniture 
•Crystal 
•Wicker 
•Antiques 
and Collectibles 



THIS&THAT 



325 North Birdneck Rd. (Birdneck Sh(^^»ig Center) 
Open Evenings til 6.<X) Mcxi.-Fri. 

OPEN 104 Sat. Va. Beach 422-3225 



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Chinese Chicken Pie Shines 

At Harvest Moon Festive Dinner 



The Harvest Moon Festival is one of the taoii impor- 
tant celebrations of the Chinese year. CombiiUiig the 
moon's birthday and a feast of thanksgiving for tiie 
harvest, this Oriental autumn festival is celebrated with 
music, poetry and games. 

Food served at this feast traditionally is round, 
imitating the shape of the moon. If you'd Uke to 
celebrate your own Harvest Moon Festival, Chinese 
Chicken Pie is in keeping with the Oriental tradition. 

Created by home economists for La Choy Food 
Products, the recipe is an American style treat featuring 
an imaginative touch of Chinese ingredients. An 
elegant entree, Chinese Chicken Pie is a meal in itsdf . 
Accompany with a side dish of tender crisp La Choy 
Pea Pods, available frozen and fortune cookies for 
dessert. 

Ghent Emporium 

Artisans Display Work 
At Renaissance Center 

A new concept in indoor shopping is now a reality in 
West Side Norfolk. It's the Ghent Emporium 
Unlimited located in 2114 Omohundro Avenue, in the 
21st Street area. The Emporium offers our area shop- 
pers a variety of quality products housed under one 
roof. 

This concept has been effective in many rn^jor 
metropolitan areas throughout the United States. The 
Torpedo Factory in Old Town Alexandria, Va. is a 
shopping area built around this idea. Ghent &n- 
porium's many shoppes (there are 22), offer antiques, 
handcrafted items and advice to those who ask for it. 
Becky Butler has spent many long hours developing Uie 
Emporium. 

The philosophy behind Ghent Emporium is to main- 
tain a Renaissance Center in Norfolk. Because of 
Ghent's growing reputation as the city's major antique 
area, almost all of the shops feature antiques. 

They, in most cases, also are manned by local ar- 
tisans. Some of these artisans work in their shops and 
local craft enthusiasts are welcome to ask them for ad- 
vice. 

Hours are very much the same as those of major 

shopping malls. The Sunday schedule provides for 

hours from 12 noon till 6 p.m. and holiday hours will be 

from 10 a.m. till 10 p.m. Ghent Emporium has its own 

Merchants Association and all of its members are licen- 

. scd withthe city of Norfolk. 

3ec^ has received encouragement from strntnadiat 
liMsses -myi xMJpermm ^ Vprmimifm^ 
Ji^^whood fran the city. ' "v^ 

"*' fhd Department of Tourism and the NATO Touflst 
Bilreau are also enthusiastic about the G9ient Empor- 
ium, Best of all, local artisans now have spaces to work 
ai^ sell their pieces at a reasonable cost to those who 
appreciate fine craftsmanship. 

The CHient Emporium will be celebrating its Second 
Anniversary on Sunday, Nov. 7 from 12 until 6 p.m. 
wi$h refreshments and entertainment for all. 

Tlie celebraticHi will feature Jodie Lcvine-IMkken 
(singer-pianist) and the Newlife Company Gospel 
Singers. 

Some members of the Tidewater Water Colorists will 
also attend and sOTie of their works will be on display. 



Come to 
our 




'<?#' 



JORDACHr 

Corral... 

Gallop over to the Kangaroo's Pouch because 
we're JORDACHE JEANS HEADQUARTERS. 
We have all the super styles (sizes 4 to teen) wtth 
matching sweat shirts and sweaters. You're t<^ 
to love the colors and Mom can't say "neigh" 
because the prices are great I 

3211 TYRE NECK RD. 
PLAZA SHOPPING CBNTERMI3-I233 
OPEN 10-6 DAILY 10-5 SAT. 
MASTER CHARGE«VISA«LAYAWAY 





BAlIXX>NS^GIFTS»PIjWrS 

"Somethff^ ^jedd For Someone Speckd*' 

CALL US: 463-2638 



HELIUM HI'S 3333 

Store #3 Vir^nia B«u:h, Va. 234S2 



CHINESE CHICKEN PIE 

(8-10 Servings) 



Vi cup all-purpose flour 

1 teaspoon La Choy Soy Sauce 

5 qg yolks, lightly beaten 



4 cu^ chicken bnHii 
>/i cup butt« 



4 cupi cooked chicken, cut m pieces 

I can ^ oz.) La Choy Water Chestnutt, 

drained, sliced 
1 can (10 ox.) chopped clams, drained 
1 pre-baked deep dish pie shell 
unbaked pastry for top crust 
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Melt butter in large skilkt; Mir in flow 
with wire whisk. Slowly add 4 cups hot broth, stirring wdl. Cookattd 
Mir until mixture is slightly thickoied and smooth. Decreaw iieat; lit 
simmer 10 minutes more, stirring occasionally. Remove from haat. 

Combine egg yolks and soy sauce in small bowl. Stk la 2 
tablespoons of the hot sauce. Pour egg mixture into ituoe, itiniag 
vigorously. Add chicken pieces, water chestnuts, and clanu. mixiag 
weU. 
^won into pre-baked pie shell. 

Roll out unbaked pastry into a circle to cover pie. Fit padiy atop, 
crimping edges over rim, pricking «nth fork to allow Meam to < 
Bake 30 to 40 minutes, or until top crust is deep, golden brown. 




T&L Casuals 




^5-4275 
1029 



Square Stopplag Caalir 
KempsrlUe Roi^ Sccttoi , 



LINGERIE JK)UI7QUE:, LTD 




WUevmkfy 



«S-304t 



i(m 

Mrs. W. MM.-6Mp.M.Mea.4il. 



Virginia Bm^ Sun, November 3, 1982 13 



The Woman't View 



jjj^ 



Notes To My Friends ... 




:Some ^reporters 
sp»daliU. y thiy find 
early on that they have a 
knack for science or 
politics or economics or 
whatever, and that's 
what tfiey wtite about. 

I noticed some 
lime back that I never 
got around to doing that. 

I dixu&ed it with my 
boss, and said I guesxd 
I'm just sort of a repor- 
t^-at large. 

'Me ^id he though of 
me SB being not so much 
at largerm at random. 



November 12, 1979 

I have managed, not to quit smoking, but to wean 
myself from cigarettes to what many insider a less 
harmful form of smoking. 

I sttioke a pipe and though I have always smoked a 
pipe to some extent, I now smoke a pipe to theexdusiion 
of all other forms Of snK>kin^. 

X^QfvX^ like to d(^ inore but I cannot; and ) know that 
thi^twei^y-four-hour -Great American Smokeout wiU 
b^, for ttie, an ext^itis^ in guilt . 

My coUeagues will parade their smokeless selves by 
my desk and shake their heads sadly at my <iegnd^Oil; 
and I will feel guilty— from behind a cloud of smoke. ' 

1 hate to do it but I will have to bring to bnr ^e 
ultimate weapon at my command: I plan to fix each oi^ 
with Sin icy stare and ask: "When was the last time you 
wrote to your mother?" 



This series of excerpts from "Notes To My Frittids" is 
brought to you through the courtesy of Tte Dmataqi 
Company, a local publishing firm, and Jim Kincai4< 
The book is availaUe in most book stores. 



HAir Cuttery 

Cuts A La Carte 

Ibe Hair Oittery is one of the largest and fastest 
growing fiunfly luurcutters in the nation. 

Several yean ago The Hair Qittery developed a 
unique hakcutting technique that assures a pn^Nkn- 
alty st^ed haurcut in a firactioa of the time. It saves 
time and tisw saves you money. 

ta fiK^t, thitt is th»r phil06(qptay, "Getting a great cut at 
a tow ifftee inthout having to wait long or make an 
ai^ointnMnt." 

Ihe Hair Qittery vpp)it% this princ^k to all their 
services ami their sta£f makes it easy for customers to 
cted^ oo the look they want 1^ crfEernig services "a la 
carte." The customer pays for the services he or she 
wants, no frills, no extras. 

How good is this "great" oit? Thousands <tf satisfied 
customers get their hair cut regularly and exclusivcl;^ at 
The Hair Qittery. 

Theif styUists are licensed, prcrfessiooal cosmetolqilsts 
who have su<xessfUly coa^)leted a rigorous training 
prqgrun designed to prepare them to make every 
ciatTOcr^ant to come back to the Hair Qittery for aU 

thdr hair needs. 

State-Skate Benefit At 
Skate-Arama Roller Rink 

Seate-A-Rama, the only roller skating rink in 
Chek^eake. will hold a State-Skate on NovembCT 6 
froiit 9 k.m. to S p.m. for the benefit of the Va. Metttal 
Health Anodation. 

Skaters obtaining the greatest dollar value of 
donations will win a prize so bring in your spcmsor 
dieetl 

For more information on this Skate-A-Rama spoi»ored 
benefit, call 48S-S537. 





Bedroom Can Be 'Haven' As Well 




Tke bedroom ~ it can be a heavenly place for other 
things besides steeping, changing, and storing clothes. 
An armchair, or even a sofa, may not be enough to 



lue one out of the noisy family room; however, the 
"haven" Illustrated could induce almost anyone to 
cherished moments of solitude. 



Open House Sunday At Woodstock Gift House 



We've Got 
Your Style! 



■%*) •iwa.j- i.-i •->'•- 



And So Much Morel 



^m^ 



NOW OPEN I 

Chimney Hills 
Shopping Center 

861 Chimney Hills Shopping Center 

340-9516 




If the charm of an old country home 
and beautiful, quality antique reproduc- 
tions get your adrenalin flowing, the 
Woodstock Gift House in Virginia 
Beach is where you'll want to spend 
some time and, probably, some money. 

On Nov. 7, you'll have a chance to 
visit one of the most unique country 
shops in tfiefareat.p&e llritfi a histo^lha* 
will fascinate th^ curious. 

Back in the days of Princess Anne 
County, there was a cluster of homes 
near Kempsville known as Woodstock. 

One of these nice old homes has served 
as a location for the Woodstock Ceramic 
Shop for over 30 years. 

The business originally occupied the 
garage of the house, but as gifts and an- 
tiques were added, the family was forced 
to new quarters. 

In recent years, due to the paucity of 
-antiques, and the great sale appeal of 
quality reproductions, even the antiques 
have been somewhat elbowed out. 

Still, the charm of an old country 
home has never been lost. 



The Woodstock Gift House has a 
room full of fabric, ribbons, calico and 
more, and an upstairs children's room 
you won't soon forget. 

The dining room is something else, 
and, in passing, you'll want to browse 
through two fascinating bedrooms and a 
den. 

Tdu^U find man anything you want in 
one of these rooms, but just to give you a 
sneak preview, antiques and reproduc- 
tions aside, you'll find crockery and pic- 
tures, and gifts of every conceivable 
description to fit every size pocketbook, 
for every occasion imaginable. 

Andy Conlon, manager, summed it 
up this way, "If we haven't got it, we 
can probably get it, and if we've got it, 
it's probably the best for the money. We 
honestly like to think of ourselves as 
people helping people." 

This reporter found the shop exciting 
to visit and the people, some of the 
friendliest folks you ever wanted to 
meet. 

You try the trip, too. You'll really be 
glad you did. 



JUST WALK iSB 

NO APPOHsrrMBNrrs 

Vli^nla's l.arg««»Wr Care Company 




(I to r) Mildred Forbes, Sue Lyn Rupert, Doris Ann Cromwell and Andy Conlon. 



UENN-AIR 




No other range 
ISma aa wnueh 

Orill up a feast on the 
convertible cooktop. 
Or bake up a meal in 
the dual-use oven. With 
* the wrsatility of regular 
teking and roasting, also 
<x>nv^tion cooking that 
cooks meats succulent and 
juicy in up to half the time 

' ttOMLD-lOO 

WrrHTHISAD txfitmll/m/n 



mo PROOF • PARTY PROOF 
• WORRY PROOF • 




♦14 5. PARUAMENT DR. 
VIRGIMIA BEACH, VA. 23462 



TU^HONE: 

490^7601 



•DISCOUNTS ON 
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•SPECIAL DESIGN 
AND CUSTOM WORK 

•GREAT BARGAINS 
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FURNISHINGS 



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"FKACnOtL fVKNITVRE FOR PRACTICAL LIFESTYLES" 



$244 FAIRFIELD SHOPPING CENTER 



495-2006 



Announcements 

Western Branch F.T.A. 

The Western Branch High School PTA will hold their 
n^eting Monday night, November 8 at 7:30 in the 
school library. 
The general topic will be "Parent Awareness." 

Sp^ikers will be Mr. Peter Prizzio from the 
Chesapeake Substance Abuse speaking on "Substance 
Abuse and the Family ;Mr. Calvin Laine from the 
ChesapoUce Protective Services speaking on "Child 
Abuse; and Mr. Hpnk Fletcher, School Youth Services 
and Mr. Pat Edgf ^ourt Services will speak on ' 'School 
Youth Service Jhesapeake Police." 

All i»rents are urg«l to attend this mating. 

Hk PTA will be in charge of the conce^on stand at 
the l^all Festival of Arts and Crafts spouored by the 
Wmmn Branch Community Cmito^. Th» will be held 
irt the high school Saturday and Sumlay, Nov. 6-7. 

Memb«^s of the (immunity are invited to come out 
uid view the omfts. 

Sigma Delta Sorority 
Second Annual 0«ft Ai^Mi 

Hie Se^ml Annual Craft ^k^m, pc^nt^l by 
Si^na E^ha Sorority will be bM Tveihy evening, 
Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at Oak Qrot% h^^^M Church. 

ProcMA will go to St. Judy's Qukfa^ns Hoi^ital. 
E ve r yoae k w^ome to attend. 



mmm 



^^^ 



iMttttiaAfliiaflMMM 



* mjmi^m 



fc*l i^ » w? il -♦ II.' S 



^^^*Va^ 



, ^j^fci^Mfc* .^i^^mim^ J li' ^^iT'^s^^^w^^s^nmmm^m 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 



Industry In Virginia Beach Renowned As Clean 



fEditor*g note: this Is the Jbtal Installment of a 
three-pal Virginia Beach &m series examining 
btdustrltd development In the city. Previous stories in 
the series foatsed upon an overview of Industry and 
featured m established compnany, StUU, Inc. This 
segment wltt look at a new, smaller company, Fontana 
Distribution, Inc.J. 

By Mike Gooding 
Suff Writer 

There is industry, and then there is industry. The 
term does not always bear the same definition. 

In the general application of the word, "industry" 
implies ndse, smokestacks and p(41ution. In Virginia 
Beach, however, industry has a reputaticm of being 
clean and light. There are no carbon-laden smoke 
particles being poured into Virginia Beach air (x toxic 
waste-filled liquids being dumped into the area's 
waters. 

This fact is a source of great pride amoig all city 
leaders queried, from Mayor Louis R. ioats to Qty 
Manager Thomas Muelenbeck. All say they do not 
necessarily want such polluting industries as coal, steel 
and paper. Instead, they say, Wginia Beach wants to 
continue attracting such companies as those which 
specialize in electroiics, abrasives, and tod manufact- 
uring. 

Another force to be reckoned with in Virginia Beach 
industry is that of distribution. Such firms as First 
Piedmont (heavy ccmstruction equipment), American 
Hospital Supplies (hospital needs), and Dreelin 
Develc^ment (drive-in overhead and dock-height 
doors) all call \flrginia Beach, "hnne." 

While traditional industry has employee payrdls 
numbering in the hundreds, industrial distributors 
employ relatively few people. One such Virginia Beach 
COTporaticMi, F(Xitana Distribution, Inc., has a staff of 
just five pec^Ie in charge of the company's United 
States (q)erati(xi. Right now, officials say, five 
employees are all the company needs. 

Fontana is an Italian firm which just came to this 
country last Etecember, opening an 18,2(X) square-foot 
warehouse on Viking Drive in the Oceana West 
Industrial Park. The company stocks and ships 
Italian-made metric and U. S.-standard fastners. 
According to canpany Vice President Grant Baird, the 
Virginia Beach site ccmtains mwe than 50 milli(Mi nuts 
and bolts in stock. 

"We are definitely one of the leading manufacturers 
of high-strength, industrial-use fasteners in the 
wcM-ld," says Baird. "We have a very good hdd on the 
market world-wide, and in the company's native Italy, 
we control something like 75 percent of the fastener 
market." 

In America, the story is slightly different. Fcmtana, 
iot all intents and purposes, is the new kid (Xi the block. 
Although the company does have a few "big-name" 
accounts, such as Internatimal Harvester, Fcmtana 
really is in the business of merely trying to crack the 
American market. "There are a lot of fastener 
manufacturers out there competing with us, but I have 
a great deal of faith that eventually we will succeed 
because we have the superior product at a ccxnpetitive 
price," says Baird. He predicts it will take some five 
years fcH* Fcmtana to become a leading distribute in the 
U.S. 

Why did so promising a firm select Virginia Beach to 
headquarter its American operaticxis? "We came here 
for the port facilities," respoids Baird. "One of our 
products, the metric bdt, is oat of the mwe 
progressive items in the metric market today, and it is 
used a lot in the textile and tdiacco industries. We 
needed to be very close to ports such as the (xies in 
Hampton Roads to keep up with those market's needs. 

"We also felt that this area was the perfect strategic 
location as far as having access to both the Noth and 
the South," says Baird. "Also, at the time we made the 
selecticNi for Virginia Beach as our site, we determined 



this was the idea location because of this building: it is 
not too big and it is not too small." Thus far, Baird says 
he and the ccmipany have found their stay in Virginia 
Beach to be "very satisfactory." 

Fcmtana is a family^owned operation, started two 
generations ago by a furniture maker who needed exact 
and precise sized bdts and nuts. He could not find any, 
so he made his own. In time, this practice expanded, 
and today Fcmtana boasts more than 3,000 employees 
at 45 plants around the world. Hie ccmipany specializes 
in externally-threaded socket head cap screws and hex 
nuts of various ccmflgurations, along with apprc^riate 
washers. The company distributes scrfely to other 
industries. 

Business in the fastener trade these days is down; 
"depressed," acccwding to Baird, who says sales have 
fallen 40 percent this year. "Eventually, Fcmtana will 
succeed because of the quality of our product," he 
says. "Nc*ody produces fasteners to the very exacting 
dimensicms that we do, where the applications that the 
products are subjected to is of the same degree of 
stress. When there is potential liability, when a product 
fails because of the fastener, a manufacturer knows he 
can trace it back to us because of the markings on our 
screws." This gives Fcmtana an edge, Baird says, 
because ccmipanies "are beccmiing pretty liabUity-con- 
scicms." 

Baird says that ccmpany Chairman Guieseppe 
Fontana realizes his company is new in the United 
States, and therefcH-e, he does not expect the American 
deivision to prosper immediately. "The market is 
unbelievable ccmipetitive," says Baird. "To show you, 
Bethlehem-Steel is the largest manufacturer of 
fasteners in the world, and they've only captured five 
percent of the market. 

"But, I'm c^timistic about America," he ccmtinues. 
"I wouldn't be in it if I didn't think it would succeed. 
The Fcmtana family, I think, would be very satisfied if 
this ccmipany managed to get just two percent of the 
market. In fact, if that happened, they would probably 
make me the Idnd of Italy." 

Whether that happens or not remains to be seen. One 
way or another, Virginia Beach has a major role in the 
future of Fontana. Baird says plans call for the company 
to make the Beach its c^raticms headquarters fc»- 
Nc^h America. 

Eventually, he said, the company may ccmsider 
moving scmie of its manufacturing c^rations from Italy 
to Virginia Beach. "Anything is possible in this 
business," said Baird. 




The steam riMS at the Union Camp plant in Franklin, Va. 



Bazaar Set 

The Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation will present 
"Santa's Stocking" on 
Nov. 20 and 21 from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Satur- 
day and from 1 to 6 p.m. 
on Sunday. The event is 
an old fashioned Christ- 
mas bazaar featuring over 
100 artists displaying their 
crafts. 

The bazaar will be held 
at the Virginia Beach 
Recreation Center/Kem- 
psville. 



Wright 
Joins 

Stephen C. Wright has 
joined Oliver, Smith and 
Cooke, architects, 
engineers and planners (a 
division of MMM Design 
Group) as director of 
Business Development. 

Claunch 
Trains 

Marine Reserve Ox- 
poral I>avid H. Qaunch of 
3024 Edingurgh £)rive, 
Virginia Beach, Va., has 
been undergoing two 
weeks of active duty 
desert warfare and sur- 
vival training in the 
Mojave Desert with the 
45th Marine Amphibicms 
Unit. 



Dr. Chaifes M. E^ving 

Podiatrist - Foot Specialist 

ANNOUNCES 

The opening of the Kempsville office. 

Specializing in Sports Medicine, 
Surgery and General Cvtt of the Foot 

For Children and Adults. 



Hours by 
Appointment 

Phone: 495-1277 



Providence South Medical Cenlcr 

5301 Providence Road 

SulUM 

Virginia Beach, VA Z3464 



>i\ 



ANNOUNCING THE 

"OUCHLESS^V 

METHOD OF EFFECTIVE 

HAIR REMOVAL... 

REMOVATRON 

At Diane's Hair styling 
unwanted hair is our problem— 

not yours! 

Throw away those temporary, messy creams. Say goodbye to 
useless plucking, shaving and waxing. Forget about "needle 
ouch" forever. Our exclusive, insultated electronic tweezers 
never touch your skin. Yet, in just seconds, the unwanted hair 
slides right out— from even your most sensitive body areas. 
Safe... WITHOUT NEEDLES. You can apply make-up right 
away, because ther6*r no swelling, no, irritation. Just HAIR 
^ FREE SKIN! Get tl**^'Smoothies". ^u'lHof^'e^elrtf: They're 
ouchless! 

FREE CONSULTATION I 
Get your "Smoothies" by calling for an appointment at 

Tidewater's only Removatron Location 




i §ai>s6 



Chesapeake 
120-D Tilden Ave. 
Great Bridge 



547-5289 

Diane Riberdy Owner & Operator 

HOURS: ~ 

Mon.-Wed.&Fri. 9a.m.-6p.ni. 

Thurs. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. 

Sat. 8 a.in.-5 p.m. 




Beach 
Gets Clean 
City Award 

The Virginia Division of 
Litter Control has an- 
noui^ed that the City of 
Virginia Beach has been 
designated as one of the 
tap 12 comprehensive pro- 
grams of litter control in 
the Commonwealth. 

For the city's accom- 
plishments, it will receive 
the Oov»nor's Award Of 
Excdlence. The City of 
Virginia Beach will receive 
four aluminum metal 
signs and a plaque pro- 
claiming this honor. The 
award will be presented at 
the Keep Virginia Beauti- 
ful Annual Awards Lun- 
cheon which will be held 
at the hotel John Marshall 
in Richmond, Virginia, on 
Jan. 19, \m. 

Deputy Commissioner 
John V. Jackson of the 
IMvision Of LittCT Control 
Mid tlw Qty of Virginia 
B»ch mt^ the award 
thrmigh hard wwk and 
conmHBity citizens 
wm-kingtt^tho'. 

The localities chosen 
were those that best 
utilized the five tasks 
^Bn^ts to a con|Nrdisi- 
rfve an^oMh: ptamung 
m^ ^(anization, com- 
tions. ^ucation, 
and law aifn^e- 




T 



Virginia Beach's 

Hometown 

Newspaper 

For Over 56 Years 



Your Commumty Service 
Paper is.... 

Abou^you 
About your neighbors 

AbNtiut Virginia Beach 



To subscribe to Th« Virginia ■•ach Sun 

just fill out the form on the right... 
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Virginia B«u;h Sun. November 3 , 1982 15 



Community H«ws 



For Musc ular Dystrophy 

Beacher Strives For $32,000 



By Mike Oooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

>%ginia Beach native 
Trish Kessler is commited 
to ddng a good job in 
whatever field of en- 
deavor in which she en- 
gages. 

She is a junior at (Xd 
Dcxninioi University, and 
at age 19^ has a^eady 
served as chairperson of 
two of the institution's 
most important student 
positions. At the end of 
her freshman year, Kes- 
sler was elected by her 
peers as head of the 
school's Activities I^o- 
gramining Board, a group 
vested with a $100,000 
budget and the respon- 
sibility of providing div- 
erse entertainment for the 
schod's 14,000 students. 

This year, Kessler has 
dived head-first into an- 
other pursuit: raising 
$32,000 for muscular dys- 
trophy. She is the co- 
chairperson of the ODU 




Superdance Committee. 
Along with feDoyir student 
Fiona Costello. Kessler 
has worked for the past 
six months arganidng the 
annual charitable event, 
which is to take place this 
weekend in ODLTs Webb 
Center. 

Some 240 students will 
take to the cafeteria floor 
and dance for SO hcHu-s in 
an effort to raise the 
funds. Each of the stu- 
dent's will have already 



received hourly pledges 
for their dancing. The 
couple receiving the most 
money and pledges will be 
rewarded with a grand 
prize: a trip for 'two to 
Florida courtesy ai East- 
em Airlines. A coupte of 
new wrinkles in this 
year's Superdance, the 
eighth one in ODlPs his- 
tory, indude a 1920's 
fashion show and a five 
idlameter race sponsored 
by lite beer. 

Doug Knapp, ODU's 
assistant dean fior student 
afEairs, is impressed with 
Kessler. Said Knapp: 
"IVish is one erf' the sharp- 
est, most personable, tal- 
ented students at this 
schod and she is a real 
pleasure to work with. 

Ibe main thing about 
Trish is the style which 
she exudes in everything 
she does. In short, she is 
marvelous. 



RDM) 




I *»t'v«iH 



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West Neck Bridge Closed 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of Public 
Works/Highway Division 
has closed the West Neck 
Road Bridge in order to 
perform bridge and r<»d 



repairs. The road betweai 
Princes Anne Road and 
Indian River Road «nU be 
dcMed until the end of the 
month. The alternate 
route for West Neck Road 
will be Princess Anne 



itoad and Indian River 
Road. 

For further infor- 
mation, contact the 
Highway Division at 427- 
4558. 



"In a very short amount 
of time," Knapp con- 
tinued, "Trish has con- 
tributed so miuih to ODM. 
The fact that she hu 
chaired both the APB md 
Superdance and is still 
just 19 years dd. speaks 
for itslef." 

Kessler, up(xi hearing 
of such praise, is very 
low-key. Aslnd why she 
becomes so involved in 
schod activities, she says 
simply, "because it is fiin. 

"I really enjoy being 
into a Id of things," 
Kessler elalxx^ated. "I 
especially like helping 
people who need help. By 
working on Superdance, I 
can do bdh." 

Kessler says that the 
public is encouraged to, 
visit the ODU campus this' 
weekend to watch the 
festivities. Further in- 
formation canbe obtained 
by calling 440-3446. 

Chamber 
Announces 
Recruiters 
Of Quarter 

Michale Hyatt, area 
manager for Lynnhaven 
Mall, and Sandra For- 
tune, core officer and vicp 
president of Virginia 
National Bank, have been 
named Hrst and second^ 
place "Recruiter of. die* 
Qu4(tcr" respectively for 
thel^ird quarter of 1982 
by the Virginia ,Beacti: 
Chamber of Commerce . 

Hyatt's and FOTtune's 
awards were announc«i 
by Membership Conunit- 
tee chairman Ed Taylor of 
Goodman and Company, 
and by Vice President for 
Organizational Affairs 
Dorcas Helfant, president 
of Helfant Realty, at the 
Chamber's recent Board 
of Directors meeting. 

Hyatt has personally 
been responsible for 
recruiting twenty-one new 
members t(k the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Com- 
merce in 1982. He has 
{deviously capttired first 
place recruiting honors for 
both the flrst and second 
quarters of 1982, accor- 
ding to Membership 
chairman Taylor. 




Gtor|c 



S. #••*«, Vh#* Dfce^r •! ^»C tt*. Mi* A. 



DiBiWi.Dtwc^^l 



Kline Is Named SIDC Volunteer Of The Year 



Richard H. Kttne of 
Virginia B^ch, R^Ion 9 
winner of the 1982 
Virginia Industrial 
Development Volunteer of 
the Year AwMtl pi«i by 
the Southern Industrial 
Develoiment Couwdl, is 



shown after Ncently 
nerving his award in 
Richmond. KHne is 
iwerttett of RidMrd IQiiw 
ChevnM, Inc. 

KUne wu ^^ct«l for 
his elftwis whfch rraulted 



in tiM exfUsAoM of tlw 
Jmtfyn Q»p(^rttoa ta- 
to a ftiD-iade diip^ud 
•Ml r^irir fadUty, witk 
antidfMt^ employment 
of 30» to 500 pe«^. M 
also n^e a ^ntamt 
^ntrftM^im of tiuK uid 



^ort in the ^tabUshment 
irftte S^ncon Ccxporation 
in Virpl^ B^^h. Kline is 
Qiairmaa of the Virginia 
B^wh ImhiMrial Develop- 
mmA Authority and a 
OMBiba- of the Chamber 
of Common. 



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Kcllo is welcomed to the firm by President Laszlo Aranyi. 

Kello Joins Design Collaborative 



Norman B. Kello, a 
native of Virginia Beach, 
has been hired as the new 
marketing director for 
The Design Collaborative, 
an architectural firm. He 
holds a certificate in 
psychology and has atten- 
ded Frederick College, 
Rutgers, Princeton and 



Hunter College. 

Experienced in many 
fields related to architec- 
ture, Kello has been a con- 
sultant in corporate oper- 
ations analysis, has taught 
marketing seminars in 
California and Arizona, 
and owned his own 
masonry company. He is 



also experienced in 
mechanical and machinery 
design. Additionally, 
Kello was sales manager 
for a company that 
marketed raw materials to 
solar component manu- 
facturers in 17 western 
states. 
Returning to Virginia 



Beach after living in the 
West, Kello brings a 
variety of professional ex- 
perience to his new 
position as marketing 
director. 

He is a member 
of the local Exchange 
Club and coaches a soccer 
team in Green Run. 



Council Okays Charter Bond Changes 



Continued frdm Pas* 9 
bond projects induded 
deletion of emergency 
lighting at various schods 
($65,000) and the addition 
(^a district couri addition 
'1:$65,000) which had been 
listed am(Mig projects re- 
quested but nd funded. 

Another $155,000 will 
be truisferred to the Dis- 
trict Court addition and 
$100,000 to the Garden 
Park at the Incinerator 
site from funds now avail- 
able in the Pavilion Park- 
ing Id project. 

Except fcM- the projects 
approved by the bond 
sales and revenue sharing 
funds, members of Qty 
Coundl emphasized the 
fact that the remaining 
projeds in the CIP would 
be reconsklered each year 
as they came up. The CIP, 
they asserted, is to be 
used as a planning and 
< advisory document. 
J Charter bond projects 
include: 

Schools, $6,401,755. 
Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley said that she 
would like to consider a 
possible referendum in 
the future on physical ed- 
ucation additions in the 
CIP. 

Engineering and High- 
way $8,071,320. Provi- 
dence Road is not being 
removed from the OP, 
lust moved back. Gtizens 

hi^ requested the con- 
struction <rf Ferrell Park- 
way fint and Council 
agreed. The proijed win 
consist of two-lanes oi a 
future four-lane divided 
highway from Indian 
Lakes Subdivision to Prin- 
cess Anne Road. 

Councilman Dr. J. 
Henry McC^ Jr. said Iw 
was not going to vote 
against the i»roject be- 
cause he knew what tlM 
feelings of the dti»ns 
are. Ife sakl that revers- 
ing tlw projects was Ultt 
winnii^ a tMttle and kx- 
w^ ikm war. He said that 
if Coundl ««re going "to 
start (ki^ tin, we'D 
have a real ms%% in thb 
dty." 

Coundlman Jolm A. 
teum said that peo^ 
have called him, ttx^ uA 
te's "not so sure pteasfa^ 
groups is the best way to 
imtode capital pragecu." 



He added, however, that 
he did not see the change 
as a complete deleti(m but 
as putting Providence 
lUiadlMCk die year. 

Mayor Louis R. J<mes 
said that it should be 
made clear to the people 
that CouncU is not taking 
Providence Road out. 

Councihnan Robert G. 
Jones said the majo* pro- 
blem presented by the 
pe<vle is the inconven- 
ience generated by ccm- 
structi(m on Providence 
Road while Ferrell Park- 
way is not developed. 

McCoy replied that 
"you can't build a road 
without inccMivenience." 

Building Projects 
$3,930,709. 

Parks and Recreation 
$691,216. 

Another $375,000 for 
Ferrell Parkway will come 
frcnn Revenue Sharing 
fimds. These funds will be 
divided among engineer- 
ing and highway projects, 
$4,907,683; Building pro- 
jects, $801,563, and Parks 
and Recreatioi projects, 
$532,100. 

Water and sewer bonds 
were approved in the 19^ 
bond referendum. First 
year funding is for 
$5,329,000 while seccmd 
year funding is for 
$2;i71.000. 

At an informal session 
of Coundl, Assistant to 
the City Manager Giles 
Dodd said that after the 
bonds are sdd the staff 
will return to Qxmcil to 
ask for a transfer of the 
$2,171,000 to be used for 
establishing a water sup- 
ply, ife said that since th 
dty's bond counsel hbu 
SOBW concern that the 
nusney could be used this 
way, the dty would ask 
the court for an opinion. 
Ihe referendum material 
stated specifically where 
tiM money for a water 
sun^y, it will be used for 
projects already listed. 

Jennings questioned 
the estimate for the 
Heahh Building renov- 
ation, a $1,372,000. 
8,000 sipiare foot buiW- 
ing. He said tl^ cost 
oomes to $140 a square 
foot and he would like the 
staff to go back to the 
drawing board. The build- 
ing is scheduled for the 



last two years of the OP. 

Muehlenbeck had said 
earlier that estimates in- 
cluded a 10 percent per 
yearihlffiddrftirte.'""'^*' 

Councihnan W. H. Kit- 
chin III pointed out that 
over the next five years 
the city's privities will 



change and so will the 
CIP. If the project "is not 
funded today, it's not on 
the line." 

McOanan said she did nd 
think that the cost of lit- 
igaticm should be included 
in the OP. 



Town Hall Meeting Set 



A town hall meeting will 
be held on Tuesday, Nov. 
16 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Green Run Section of 
Virginia Beach. The 
meeting will be held at the 
Green Run Homes 
Association Club House, 
1248 Green Garden Circle. 

In order to hear and 
discuss the concerns of 
residents, the following 
representatives of the City 
of Virginia Beach will be 



present: Councilwoman 
Reba S. McClanan, City 
Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck, School 
Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell, Deputy Superin- 
tendent Bruce McGuire, 
City Engineer D. R. 
Trueblood and Comman- 
ding Officer - First 
Precinct Captain M. E. 
Beane. 

Residents of this area 
are urged to attend. 



Tax Aid Is Available 



"Tax-Aide," a free 
Virginia Beach tax coun- 
seling service for senior 
dtizens, needs volunteer 
tax counselors for the 
1982 tax season. 

This program is spon- 
sored by AARP-NRTA 
and the Internal Revenue 



Service. Training sessions 
for prospective counselors 
will be conducted during 
January 1983. 

Interested parties 
should contact Col. A. T. 
Grubbs, Ret., at Tel. 467- 
2459 or Mr. R. J. 
O'MaUey at 464-6520. 



Finance Classes Offered 



Family Financing 
classes will be offered by 
the Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension 
Service beginning Nov. 3, 
and continue on Nov. 10 
and 17 from 10 to 12 
noon. 

Guest speakers will be 
Leonard Lohman, Con- 
sumer Credit Counseling 



Center, and Barbara 
Keeler, Family Financial 
Educator/Navy Family 
Services Center. 

For further information 
and pre-registration, con- 
tact Gayle Z. Lawrence 
Extension Agent, 427- 
4511. Th«e classes are 
free and will be held at the 
VPl Annex located on 
Birdneck Road. 



Free Homebuyers School 



A free homebuyers 
school will be sponsM^ 
by Goodman S^ar Hogan 
Residential Sales Cor- 
poration on Thursday, 
Nov. 4 trom 7 to 9 p.m. at 
the following offlcra: Bir- 
dneck, \W1 Laskin RwkI, 
Suite 105, Virginia B«Kh, 
Va. 422-9TO0; Kempsvillc. 
349 Kempsville Plaza, 
Virginia Beach, Va.. 490- 
1212. 



The school will discuss 
the legal and finandng 
aspects of home buying 
and the real C(m of home 
ownership. 



The Homebuyers 
Schoob are <^ien to the 
public and reservations 
can \x m^te by oA^ any 
of the Goodman S^ar 
Hogan off^s. 



^m^mmmm^mmmmmm^^mmfmmmmimmmi 



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16 Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 



Beach Filipinos Seek Community Acceptance 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

He is one of sane 
30,000 natives of the Riil- 
ippines residing in Vir- 
ginia Beach, but, accord- 
ing to Chris Rcxnero, his 
words sum up the 
thoughts pf his country- 
men. "We just want to be 
in the flow of the ciurent 
of the area." 




Lingad 



Romero is the chairman 
of the Council of United 
FiUpino Organizations of 
Tidewater, a group which 
brings together 10 indivi- 
dual affiliations of Fili- 
pinos. "Our goal is to 
foster, promote, cherish 
and preserve Filipino cul- 
ture and the heritage of 
6Ur native land," he said. 
Additionally, Romero 
said, the organization 
aims to carve a place for 
itself in the bosom of the 
city. "We are a law-abid- 
ing people, but being in a 
minority we have to make 
the community aware we 
are here and that we want 
to contribute to it." The 
Leukemia Society of Am- 
erica, the American Heart 
Association, and Child- 
ren's Hospital of the 
King's Daughters are but 
a few of the local organ- 
izations which have rec- 
eived charitable gestures 
from the Filipino com- 
munity. 

Fred Lingad, another 



Filipino, believes dili- 
gence is the key to a for- 
eigner's success. "Any 
ethnic group caning into 
a develc^ing country has 
no choice but to wak hard 
if they want to prosper," 
he said. "You've got to 
adapt yourself to get ab- 
sorbed in the working 
activities and lifestyle of a 
vicinity. If you do not do 
this, you get left behind." 

A part of the American 
socialization process, ac- 
ceding to Lingad, is to 
become involved in mun- 
icipal affairs. "It woi't be 
long until Filipinos are 
involved in Virginia Beach 
government," he said. 
"We have to becone a 
part of the system to show 
that we are worthy of 
belonging. Otherwise, we 
have no reason fa being 
here." 

Romero share's Lin- 
gad's feeUngs of the im- 
portance of Filipino in- 
fluence in local govern- 
ment. "We need to fom a 



stroig pditical group so 
that our voice can be 
heard," he said. "It is 
pTdb&hly true that the 
government is sonewhat 
insenstive to Filipino 
needs. Sane of the can- 
didates are now aware 
that we are here. My hope 
is that every Filipino in 
Wginia Beach is reg- 
istered to vae." 

lingad has been in this 
country fa just over one 
year; Romero, 18. They 
join an elite group of 
Filipino professioials who 
engage in every type of 
business fron architec- 
ture to law. Lingad is a 
film distributor who 
moonlights as a consul- 
tant fa the Natiaial Rev- 
enue Capaation of Col- 
umbus, Otdo. Ranero, 
who hdds an engineering 
degree fran Old Donin- 
iai University, manages 
the two offices of his wife, 
Aleli, who is a docta. In 
Vu-ginia Beach, there are 
62 FiUpinos who practice 



medicine. 

How and why did they 
come to Virginia Beach? 
Many of the city's FU- 
ipinos became stationed 
here via their employment 
with the United States 
Navy; romero was one of 
them. 

"When I was stationed 
here in 1964 I fell in love 
with this place," said 
Romero. "I had planned 
on settling down in Boston 
or in California, but here 
we had good weather and 
abundant seafood." 

The fomer electrician's 
mate first claiss had trav- 
eled extensively to such 
exotic locations as Japan, 
Hong Koig, adn the 
Mediterranean befae set- 
tling upoi ^^rginia Beach. 
Still, as much as he and 
his family enjoy their lives 
here, there is still a yearn- 
ing to return to their 
native homes. "It is very 
hard to leave your coun- 
try," he said. "Fa the 



future, this is the land of 
(qjpotunity." , 

lingad, a former city 
Kxmcilman in the capitid 
of the Philippines, Quezon 
Qty. came here on busi- 
ness in 1981, and ended 
up staying. "My daughter 
was here as a U.S. citizen, 
married to a Filipino 
saila, so I wanted to be 
here," he said. "Plus, 
there was much about this 
city I liked. I have traveled 
to a ntmiber of important 
places, but I am excited 
by Virginia Beach. Here, 
there is still a lot of room 
fa grcnving and improv- 
ing. Also, (me does not 
live a rat race life. Finally, 
I find Virginia Beach to be 
very coiducive to practic- 
ing one's profession. 

Both Romero and Lin- 
gad say they were in this 
country fa quite some 
time befae becoming in- 
volved in Filipino agan- 
izations. Since doing so, 
both men say they are 



much happier. "Part of 
oir education is learning 
that organizations can 
achieve goals," said Lin- 
gad. "Our goals are to 
foster friendship unong 
each other and with out- 
side elements while re- 
taining cultural trad- 
itiois." 

"My wife and I were at 
a real loss befae we be- 
came invdved with FiU- 
pino organizations," said 
Romero. "In fact, for a 
long time, our only friend 
was my Ibrmer shipmate. 
However, we heard of a 
Filipino who needed help, 
and that is when we be- 
came invdved." 

Fa members of the 
Filipino community in Mr- 
ginia Beach, being in- 
volved means gathering 
with other Filipinos and 
celebrating life. "We Fili- 
pinos are very fold oi 
celebratiois," said Lin- 
gad. "These sorts of 
things are carried on very 
much, so there is always a 



gathering of sane sot 
gang oi." Among the 
Filipino events staged an- 
nually, according to Rom- 
ero, are the Miss and 
Mrs. Philippines cottests, 
the Miss Ilondia contest, 
the Little Miss Philippines 
coitest, and various cele- 
brations of the arts. 




Romero 



Goblins and Ghouls Spook Virginia Beach 




Hundreds of Trick-or-Treaters descended upon 
Fairfield Shopping Center. 



Funny, fumbling and frightening characterize these three members of Pack 391. From left to right are 
Kevin Humes, 9; Jimme Quinn, 9; and Jimmy Slonehock^, 10. 



TUfl fattier and son sau« team Is Wayne and 
Greg flaniiigan. Greg is seven. 




A mummy and a sailor were among the participants in Pack 391's Halloween pack meeting. The mum- 
my is Jeff Davis, 8, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Davis. The sailor is David Watson, 9, sob of Mr. and Mrs. 
David Watson. 

Cub Scouts Hold Halloween Party 




Senior Citbxm partied at Virata BeKh EecrMtioB Cento/KemiHviile. 



Virginia Beach Cub 
Scout Pack 391, 
Pauab District, 
Tidewater Council, 
recently held its 
regular meeting at 
Hermitage Elemen- 
tary School. 

The night was 
cool, the moon 
glowed warmly and 
the stars glittered 
brightly as parents 
brought their 

costumed youngsters 
to the school for a 
meeting, party, and 
presentation of awar- 
ds. 

Cubmaster for' 
pack 391 is Pete 
Gavritv. Commiitt^ 



chairman is John 
Elder. Den leader 
coach is Melody 
Judge. Awards 
chairman is Debby 
Elder. Secretary is 
Cindy Davis, and 
treasurer is Joanne 
Tluchek. 

Members of Cub 
Scout Pack 391, by 
den are: 



Denl 

Leader: Linda Watson; 
Jeff Davis, Roger Guin, 
Donald Jody, David Wat- 
son, Jimmy Sn[iock, 
Donald Totty, and Travis 
Harris. 



Den 2 

Leader: Roxie Ruth; 
Josh Sutton, Jimmy 
Quinn, James 

Stonehacker, Johnny Kay, 
Kevin Humes, Brandon 
Ruth, and Robby 
Newland. 

Den 3 

Leader: Susan 

Beacham; Eric Beacham, 
Walter Wooten, Matt 
Harrington, Richard 
Allen, Karlo Llamado, 
Ross Herda, and Paul 
Wadley. 



Den 4 

Leado": Susan Hilfer; 
Jacob Allen, Michael 
Hendricks, Matthew 
Hilfer, and Andrew 
Lig^to. 



Den 5 

Leader: Mary Murray; 
Randall Smith, Geoff 
Turner, Erick Tluchak, 
and Chris Murray. 

Den 6 

Leado-: Carol Toohey; 
Jonathon Caldwell, 
Christopher Campbell, 
Kenny Ellis, Cory 
Hwigins, Brian Maniey, 
Phillip Roberts, and Scott 
RoppoUo. 

Weblos 

Leasts: Bob Harwood; 
Lance Toohey, Michael 
Harwood, Mike Davis, 
Gannon Sutton, Shannon 
Sutton, Shane Bangert, 
Oiuck Oaurity, and Tim- 
my Young, Mike 
Harrington, Mike Boyd, 
l^vid Allen, and Dusty 




Mn. Smn DukUm, a teachM^ at itaHka EleiMitM7, !•« the tap fw tttM Vlr^ite Beteh youngsters. 



'^'7 



/ 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



Virginia Be«;b Sun, Novonber 3. 1982 17 



"^ 



NMcWMriiit ~[ f NbhcNMrhig 



rMNC HMrinC 



On Monday, November 15, 1982, at 2:00 p.m., in the 

Council Chambers of the City of Virginia Beach, the 

aty Council will hold a PUBLIC HEARING.' 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

OF 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND EXTEND 

THEHUNCHISEOF 

RESORT SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS, INC. 

An ammdment to and extension of the franchise of 
Resort Satellite Communications, Inc., is hereby 
proposed to be granted. Said franchise was awarded by 
the Council of the Qty of Virginia Beach, Virginia, on 
March 2, 1^1. The franchise granted Resort Satellite 
Communications, Inc., undo* certain terms and con- 
ditions, the right and privilege to construct, operate, 
and maintain a cable tdevision system within a certain 
portion of the Beach Borough of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 

The foUowing amendment to the franchise of Resort 
Satellite Communications, Inc., has been proposed: 

1. The franchise shaUbe in accordance with the 
CATV Ordinance which was adopted by the Council of 
the aty of Virginia Beach. Virginia, on March 17, 1973, 
with the follo^^ng exceptions. 

a. Subparagraph 6C, describing the initial service 
area, shall be limited to the Borough of Virginia Beach 
(Beach Borough) as it existed on September 1, 1982, and 
along 19th Street, outside of said Beach Borough, to its 
intersection with Birdneck Road. 

b. Subparagraph 6E shaU be deleted. 

c. Paragraph 13 of the CATV Ordinance shall be ap- 
plicable to this franchise but subparagraphs 13A and 
13B shall be amended to read as follows: 

13. Security Fimd 

A. Within thirty days after the acceptance of this 
franchise, the Grantee shall deposit with the City 
Treasurer and maintain on deposit through the term of 
its franchise the sum of $2,000 in cash and in addition 
shall post a construction performance bond in favor of 
the City of Virginia Beach m the amount of $100,000. 
The cash deposit shall serve as security for the faithful 
performance by the Grantee of all of the provisions of 
this ordinance, except those pertaining to construction 
of the system and compliance with all orders, permits, 
and directions of any agency of the City having jurisdic- 
tion over its acts and defaults under this ordinance, and 
the payment by the Ch«ntee of any claims, liens, and 
taxes due the City which arise by reason of the opetation 
or maintenance of the system. The construction per- 
formance bond shall serve as serairity for the faithful 
performance by the Grantee of all provisions of this or- 
dinance pmaining to tl» construction of the system and 
shall be in such form and with such surety as approved 
by the City Attorney. The construction performance 
bond shall be r^u^d in pro rata increments based upon 
capital investment. 

The reduction and accompanying capital investments 
are as follows: . ,^. -+..-,,*> ^ 



• 


CPWtniqlionjQii^ 


j.flrtflL 1 


imMMfiim 




Pcrccntaie Cott^ 


q''i&«iaoi 


i^iVtmi". 


Stepl 


25 250 


20,000 


80,000 


Step2 


50 500^ 


20,000 


60.000 


Step3 


75 750 


20,000 


40,000 


Step4 


100 1.000 


20,000 


20,000 



Upon completion of construction as required by the 
franchise, the Grantee shall maintain an operating per- 
formance bond in the amount of $20,000 for the 
duration of the franchise. Application for bond reduc- 
tion may be made to the City Manager's offlce. 
Documentation of capital investment must accompany 
this request. Such documentation may be reviewed in 
accord with section 9, paragraph C, and section 11, 
paragraph B. 

B. WiUiin thirty days after notice to it that any 
amount has been withdrawn from the security fund 
deposited pursuant to paragraph A of this Section, the 
Grantee shall pay to or deposit with the City Treasurer a 
sum of money sufficient to restwe such security fund to 
the original amount of $2,000. 

2. Notwithstamiing paragraph 9A, the Grantee shall 
compute the franchise fee on gross revenues, and with 
the understanding that any increase in the franchise fee 
would be consider^ as an added expense and, 
therefore, would be passed onto the consumer, either as 
an add-on to the bill or as a part of tl» rate base. Fva- 
thermore, the Grantee agrea that it will support an ^>- 
plication to the rcC wh«i and if Oty Council, after 
further study and deliberation on its issue, decides to 
request an ina^ased franchise fee of either four or five 
pCTcmt. 

3. The fifte«i-year period of duration for the fran- 
chise shall be deemed to run from date of adoption of 
this ordiiumce of amendment and extension . 

ffids for such franchise, as amended above, shall be 
submitted in writii^ to tlw OfHce of die City Manager, 
Munidpid Cen^, Virginia Bau:h, Virginia, on or 
before November 15, 1982, at 2K)0 p.m. In accordance 
with Sute itatirte. the Qty of Virginia Beach reserves 
the ri^t to reject any and all bids for such franchise or 
the amendment thw eef . 
Ruth Hodges Smitii, Gty Clerk 
aty of Viigjnia B«u^, Viiginia 
lfi9-24Tn/10VB . 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Bn^ Plannii^ Commission will hold a 
Public Hearing on Tu^ay, Novemb« 9, 1982, at 12:00 
Noon in the Coundl OiambKS of the City Hall 
ftiilding. Prince Anne O»urthou», Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will be h^ at 9:30 a.m. in 
the Planning Department Conference Room, 
Operations Building. PLANNING COMMISSION 
ACTION IS Mn A nNAL DETERMINATION OF 
THE APPLICATION, BUT ONLY A RECOMMEN- 
DATION TO THE CTTY COUNCIL AS THE VIEW- 
POINT OF TJffi PLANNING C»MMISSION. FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE APPLICATION IS TO 
BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE, 
AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A NEWSPAPER 
HAVING GENERAL CIRCULATION WITHIN THE 
CITY. The fcrflowing applications will appear on the 
aMnda: 

DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BE PLANNING COM- 
MISSION ON OCTOBER 12, 1W2: 
1. An Ordinance upon Application of J. C. Wiicher, 
Jr.. for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for two 
duplexes on pr^my Iwat^ on the South side of 12th 



Street, 100 feet East of Rudee Avenue. Said |MUt^ is 
known as Lots 5, 6, 7 and 8, Block 1 18, Lakewood, and 
contains 9,979 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Nancy T. Warr^ 
for a conditional' USE PERMIT for a tourist 
home on certain property located 700 feet more or less 
Northeast of London Bridge Road beginning at a point 
3900 feet more or less Northwest of the intersection of 
London Bridge Road and Oceana Boulevard, running a 
distance of 371.35 feet in a Northwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 586.58 feet in a Northeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 310.55 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 619.83 
feet in a Southwntnly direction. Said parcel is located 
at 2380 London Bridge Road and contains 4.72 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

3. Appeal from D^isions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for James E. Moore, Sr. Property 
located at the Western extremity of the intersection of 
River Road and River Court and contains 7.84 acra. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Departinent of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Of fleers in 
re^ud to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Richard W. Galliford. Property 
located at 836 South Spigel Drive and contains 2.32 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Clyde L. CoUio^ 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-2 Apartment District to A- 
3 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
North side of North Greenwdl Road beginning at a 
point 36.48 feet West of Northampton Boulevard, run^ 
ning a distance of 506.37 feet along the NorUi side of 
North Greenwell Road, running a distance of 267.19 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 464.42 feet along the Northern property line, running 
a distance of 147.08 feet along the West side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard and running a distance of 122.57 
feet in a Southerly direction. Said parcel contains 3.015 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Cavalier Proper- 
ties/Hilltop, a Limited Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to A-2 Apartment District 
on certain property located on the West side of First 
Colonial Road beginning at a point 1 18 feet more or less 
South of Wolfsnare Road, running a distance of 159 
feet along the West side of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 190.32 feet in a Southwesterly dira:tion, 
running a distance of 210 feet in a Southeasterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 40 feet in a Soutiiwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 386.25 feet in 

stery^idjcgg^^rfunning^^dist^pce of 66(^( 
ig the S^tfaern property luie, running a distai 
ck of 749.98 feet along the Western property line and 
running a distance of 779.81 feet along the Northern 
property line. Said parcel contains 11.6 acres. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Lisa C. Pascarosa 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to O- 
1 Office District on property located on the North side 
of Boyd Road, 100 feet more or less West of South 
Plaza Trail on Lot 120, Westmoreland Estates. Said 
parcel is located at 3408 Boyd Road and contain! 
7740.78 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Application of Hunt Contracting 
Co., Inc. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to P- 
1 Preservation District on property located on the North 
side of Parliament Drive, 400 feet more or less West of 
Yoder Lane, as shown on plats on flle in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company, A General Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to B-2 Community-Business District 
on certain propoty located on the East side of General 
Booth Boulevard b^inning at a point 480 fMt more or 
less South of South ttnlneck Road, running a distance 
of 316.10 fMt along iht East side of Gen«-al Booth 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet more or less 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
230 feet more or l«s in a Northeasterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 90 feet more or less in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 45.65 feet in a Northerly 
direction and nmning a distance of 191 .87 fMt along the 
Northern property line. Said iMUcel contains 1.496 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company, A General Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R 8 
Residoitial District to O-l Office IMstrict on c^tain 
property located on the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard banning at a point 800 fMt more or less 
South of South Birdneck Road, running a distant of 
340 feet along the East side of General &>oth 
Boulevard, running a distam^ of 130 feet along the 
Southon property line, running a distance of 340 feet 
along the Ea^em prepay line and running a distance 
of 130 fe^ idoi^ the North«-n propoty line. Said parcel 
contains 1.01 aare. PRINCESS ANNE »3ROUGH. 

1 1 . An Ordinani» upon Application of The Bailey Wick 
OMni^my, a Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A.2i^}wtment Distrirt to A 
3 A{wrtment I^trict on <^rt«n property loaitei on the 
South s^ of Old Vir^nia B«ich Boulevard b^inning 
at a point \W fcei East of West Lane, running a distan- 
ce of 132.30 fi^ along tlw South side of CM Viiginia 
Bmch Boulevard, running a dbt^i« of ^.39 f^t 
^<mg the Eastern propoty Um, running a dtotuix of 
123.67 feet along the Southern prop»ty liiM, running a 
distance of 1M.20 feet in a Northerly di^ion, running 
a distal^ of 1 10 fert in a W^^^ i^«:tton, running a 
#Mance of 22 fi^ along the Eul ti^ of W^t Lane, 
running a distance of 109.92 f^ in an &»teTly dimtion 
ami running a distame of 167.28 tsH in a Northerly 
dir»:tion. Said (mtmI contains 1.138 Ktm. LYN- 
NHAVEN KJROUOH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMrT: 



12. An Ordinance upon Application of Kimmel 
Automotive, Inc. T/A Treadquarters, for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for mounting and Mandsg 
tires on certain propoty located on the North side of 
Shore Drive b^inning at a pmnt 160 feet more or less 
West of Pleasure House Road, running a distance of 
ISO feet along the North side of Shore Drive, running a 
distance of 200 feet along the Western property liiw, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 200 feet atong 
the Eastern property line. Said parcel is located at 4816 
Shore Drive and contains 30,000 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An ordinance upon Apj^cation of Miller Oil Com- 
pany, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
an automobile sarnce station on propmy lociUeid at the 
Southwest comer of Poplar Point Road and North 
Great Neck Road, running a distance of 130.17 feet 
along the West side of North Great Neck Road, running 
a distance of 125 .feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Western proper- 
ty line, running a distant of 105. 17 feet along the South 
side of Poplar Point Road and running around a curve a 
distance of 31.25 feet. Said parcel contains 18,750 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Application of OGM 
Retirement FaciUties for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home for the aged on certain property 
located on the West side of First Colonial Road begin- 
ning at a point 1 18 feet more or less Soyth of Wolfsnare 
Road, running a distance of 159 feet along the West side 
of First Colonial Road, running a distance of 190.32 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
210 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 40 feet in a Southwesterly direction, rtuming a 
distance of 386.25 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 660.07 feet along the Southern 
property line, running a distance of 749.98 feet along 
the Western property line and running a distance of 
779.81 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 1 1 .6 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Application of Ferrell Farm 
Development Corporation, or Assigns, for a CON- 
DITINAL USE PERMIT for a 150 room motel on cer- 
tain property located on the East side of Bonney Road 
beginning at a point 800 feet more or less Southeast of 
the intersection of Bonney Road and Independence 
Boulevard, running a distance of 170 feet more or less 
along the East side of Boimey Road, running a distance 
of 866.97 feet in a Northeasterly direction, nmning a 
distance of 66.40 feet in a Northwesterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 40 feet in a Westerly direction, run- 
ning a distuice of 44.70 feet in a Southwesterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 89 feet in a Westerly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 62 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 27 feet in a Westerly 
direction, running a distance of 52.70 feet in a North- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 39.60 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 29.80 

*.^eet in a Wester^ Section, ruiming a distance of 49 
X fleet in a Northerly direction, nmning a distance of 55.3 1 
^feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 
221.86 feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 135.53 feet in a Southeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 365.23 feet in a Southwesteriy 
direction. Said parcel contains 3.476 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Application of Virginia Beach 
United Methodist Church for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMTT for an addition to a church on property 
located at the Northeast corner of 18th Street and 
Pacific Avenue on Lots 14 thru 22, Block 32, Plat No. 
2, Virginia Beach Development Company. Said parcel is 
located at 207 18th Street and contains 1.446 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Application of Putt-Putt Golf 
and Games for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
miniature golf course on certain property located on the 
South side of Lynnhaven Parkway beginning at a point 
750 feet more or less East of South Lynnhaven Road, 
miming a distance of 196 feet along tiie South side of 
Lynnhaven Parkway, nmning a distance of 469 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 40 feet in 
a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 278 feet 
in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 41 feet in a 

* Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 62 feet in 
a Northeasterly direction and running a distance of 258 
feet in a Northwesterly dirwtion. Said parcel contains 2 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Application of William N. 
Thompson for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for an 
•utomobite repair esublishment on propoty locat«l on 
flie North side of Holland Road, 93 feet East of Garfiekl 
Avenue on Lots 17 thru 20, Block 8, Pet^n Gardens. 
Said parcel contains 32,187.4 square feet. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE: 

19. Application of Peter J. Gualeni and Joseph J. 
Omdmi for the discontinuance, closure and lUwndtm- 
m^t of a portion of an alley located between Virginia 
IbKh Boulevard and 18th Street beginning at a pdnt 
140 feet East of Washington Avenue, running a distuice 
of 93.^ feet along tlM Southern property line, running 
a distance of 20 feet along the Eastenr propoty Une, 
running a distance of 90.60 feet along the Noitlion 
l»roperty line and runnng a distance of 20. 17 feet along 
the Western property line. Said parcel contains 1845.8 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENT: 

20. Motion fo the Planning Commission of the Oty of 
Virgiiua Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
14. Sections 1401, 14(B. 1«)3, 1405, 1407, 1408 and 
1409 of the Compreli«w\« Zoning Ordiname relating 
to wetiands. More detailed information is avaUabte in 
the DqMTtment of Planning. 

ntts with uMre deti^Ml infomutf ion are available in the 

D^HUtmoit of Planni^. 

All intemted persons ate invited to atteml. 

Robert J. Sc»tt 

IXrector of Plannii^ 

1^-8 2T 11/3 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Vir^nia: 

Hie regular meeting of the Qty Couwal of Vk^aia 
B«ich wiU be h^tfd in the CouiKtl Chu^cn of the Oty 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Pri^^s Anac 
SUttMM, Virginki BoKh, Virginia on Mmiday Novembo 



22, 1^, at 7K)0 p.m., at wluch time tiie foUowing ap- 

l^eatioia will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

VIROINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

i. Afi CH'tttuuMc upon Application of Chailm R. 

Malboo lUd Jolm F. Malbon for a CHANGE OF 

ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-3 

Residential District to R-8 Residential District 

(Modified from A-3 Apartment District) on Lot 75, 

Xinkhom Park located at the Northwest corner of Holly 

Road and West Holly Road. Said parcel is kown as 500 

West Holly RMd and contains 1.05 acres. VIRGINIA 

BEACH BOROUGH. 

CONDrriONAL USE PERMITS: 

VIROINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon ^plication of Oliver F. Redd, 
Jr., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a medical 
office (Osteopathic Physician) on property located on 
the North dde of 22nd Street, 110 feet East of 
Mediterranean Avenue ami known as Lot C, Block 55, 
as shown on Map 6, Virginia Beach Development Com- 
pany. »i^ located at 513 22nd Street. Parcel contains 
6098 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of John C. Aspin- 
wall. III, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
mini-warehouses on certain property located on the 
West side of Rosemont R<wd bginning at a point 1 8 1 .74 
feet South of Uie Virginia Beach-Norfolk Toll Road, 
running a distance of 156.56 feet along the West side of 
Rosonont Road, running a distance of 136.52 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 175.01 feet in 
a Southoly direction, running a distance of 471.02 feet 
along the Southon propoty line, running a distance of 
460.44 feet along the Western property Une. running a 
distance of 350.34 feet along the Northern property line, 
running a distance of 199.97 feet in a Southerly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 245.07 feet in an Easterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.81 acres. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Gate Petroleum 
Company for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for an 
automobile service station on certain property located 
on the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard begin- 
ning at a point 200 feet more or less West of Highway 
Lane, nimting a distance of 200 feet along the South 
side of Virginia Boulevard, running a distance of 144.74 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 200 feet along the Southern property line and running 
a distance of 144.74 feet along the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 28,948 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Miller Oil Com- 
pany, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
an automobile service station on property located at the 
Southwest comer of Poplar Point Road and North 
Grei^ Neck Road, runmng a distance of 130.17 feet 
along tiif West side of North Great Neck Road, running 
a disti^ of 125 feet atoog the Smith c m p r op r r tyJiae, 
running a distancc,of 150 feet along the Western proper- 
ty line, running a distance of 105. 17 feet along the South 
side of Poplar Point Road and running around a curve a 
distance of 31.25 feet. Said parcel contains 18,750 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENT: 

6. Motion of the Planning Commission of the City of 
Vu-ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
6, Sectiim 602(e) of the Comprehensive Zoning Or- 
dinance pertaining to maximum density regulations in 
the A-1 Apartment District. More detailed information 
is available in the Depvtment of Planning. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All iittoested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

atyOerk 

171-1 2T1 1/10 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the aty Council of Virginia 
BeKh will be heard in the CouncU Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virgink Beach, Virginia on Monday, Novem- 
ber 15, 1982, at 2:00 p.m., at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTICT 

GLASSinCATION: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordiiumce upon ^plication of Christopher 
Development Co., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community- 
Business District to A-2 Apartment District on certain 
pxopaty located on the South side of Baxter Road 
beginning at a point 820 feet pore or less West of In- 
dependeme Boulevard, running a distance of 643.50 
fett along the South si<k of Baxto Rmui, running a 
cUstance of 822.11 fe^ in a Southeasterly dir»;tion, 
nmning a dktance of 188.21 feet in a Northerly direc- 
tkHi, running a distance of 477.32 feet in a Nor- 
theastoly direction and ranning a distance of 685.77 
feet .in a Nwthwestoly direction. Said parcel contains 
10.220 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

2. An OrdinaiKe upon Apt^iXion of Keith G. and 
Joann Shiffer for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSinCATION from R-8 Residential 
District to B-2 Oxnmunity-Business IMstrict on cotain 
ptopmty located on the West ride of Kemi»ville Road 
be#niting at a pcrfnt 9(X) feet mOTe or Ins South of In- 
dtan Wvet Road, running a distance of 111.17 feet 
akmg the Wat sute of Konpsville Road, running a 
disttUKe of 352.39 feet along the Southon property line, 
runadng a disUmx of 153.% feO atong the W»tern 
property Une aiKl runmng a distance of 310.38 feet 
dong die Nortbon ^opmty Une. Said ^vi^ is located 
ai 1453 Ko^fviDe Road ai»l <»ittaiiB 40,946 square 
feet. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL Vm PERMTTS: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

3. An OrA^AWX upon ApNiatMn of Waker F. 
&tnvin, tt^qi of MdwMnd, ai^ ^ agent Reverend 
J«c^ L. (^vk, ftMOT of St. Ktark's CathoUc Church, 
Hft a CXJNDrnONAL US pondt fcx' a s^mk mi cer- 
t^ ^epatf touted «i ^ Weti aite of K^i^ville 
Road begJMliii at a p^t IKtS fe^ more or tos &uth 
of IM^ I^e Road, nuu^ a 4Ma« of 333 feet 
akmg ihe Wi^ i^ of IQa^ivifle Rmd, runnl^ a 



mmam 



I ' i ■ "I ''\9mmmm^fmmm^mwwww^wmmmm 



vi^ 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



PHbNcNMring 



Public HMring 



distance of 985 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 252 feet along the Western proper- 
ty line and running a distance of %9 feet along the Nor- 
thern property line. Said parcel is located at 1505 Kem- 
psville Road and contains 6.58 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

4. An ordinance upon Application of Urban-Lite, Inc., 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for three 14' x 
48' billboards on certain property located on the South 
side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, West of Rosemont 
Road on Lots 1-4 and 16-20, Block 5; Lots 1-12 and 16- 
29, Block 7, and Lots 1-8 and 18-24, Block 21, as shown 
on the plat entitled "A part of Deal No. 1 and Deal No. 
2" and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Circuit 
Court in Map Book 41, Page 9. Said parcels contain 
3.766 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

An Ordinance upon Application of Red Roof Inns, 
Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 109- 
unit motel on property located 591 feet East of the inter- 
section of Newtown Road and Greenwich Road, run- 
ning a distance of 385 feet along the Northern property 
line, running a distance of 430 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 166 feet in a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 270 feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 217 feet in a 
Westerly direction and running a distance of 166 feet 
along the Western property line. Said parcel contains 
2.4 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 
6. An Ordinance upon Application of R. Wayne 
Rusbuldt and Ruth Anne Rusbuldt for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a communications tower 
on certain property located on the West side of 
Rusbuldt Lane (formerly Meadow Drive) beginning at a 
point 1050 feet more or less Southwest of Salem Road. 
Said parcel is known as Lots 17, 18, 19, 20, Salem 
Acres, and contains 4.47 acres. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith > 
City Clerk 
171-2 2T 11/3 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, November 17, 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Edward and Loretta Kardel requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 79, Block 5, 
Phase, 111-C, The Lakes, 3327 Boynton Court. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

2. Barry C. and Brenda J. Reade requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 35, Block A, 
Section 2, Lake Placid, 2552 Placid Place. Princess An- 
ne Borough. 

3. Hyrum 1 hornock requests a variance of 4. 1 feet to a 
25.9 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (covered porch) on Lot 192, Gardenwood 
Park, 5465 Sunnywood Drive. Bayside Borough. 

4. Theodore L. Spilman, III and Lt. Vicki M. Spilman 
requests a variance of 10 feet to a "0" side and rear yard 
setback (southeast corner) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (deck and storage shed) on Lot 622, Sectioti 10, 
Malibu, 3617 Sea Horse Way. Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Associated Aluminum Product Company, Inc. 
requests a variance of 9 parking spaces to 29 parking 
spaces instead of 38 parking spaces as required (addition 
- office warehouse) on Parcel B, Kempsville Plaza 
South, 5250 Challedon Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

6. Beach Car Wash, Inc. requests a variance of 1 free- 
standing sign to 2 free-standing signs instead of 1 free- 
standing sign as allowed on 50 feet of Lot 2, and part of 
Lot 24, eastern 50 feet to Lot 3 through 14 and all of 
Lots 25-36, Block 40, Aragona, 4981 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

7. Henry Sargent requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building) on Lot 39, Block 17, Section 2, 
Arrowhead, 212 E. Ottawa Roi^d. Kempsville Borough. 

8. Ernest C. Consolvo requests a variance of 10 feet to a 
25 foot setback from Garrett Drive and 4 feet to a 31 
foot setback from Columbus Loop instead of 35 feet 
each as required (office addition) on Lots 24 through lot 
29, Block 40, Sunny Brook, 4560 Columbus Loop. 
Bayside Borough. 

9. John W. and Beth M. Aldridge requests a variance of 
5 feet to a 25 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet 
as required (residential addition) on Lot 7, Block I, Sec- 
tion 3, Fox Run, 4790 Rosecroft Street. Kempsville 
Borough. 

10. Robert M. Devine requests a variance of 20 feet to a 
30 foot front yard setback (Ruthesay Road) instead of 
50 feet as required on Lot 51, Bay Colony, 912 Bay 
Colony Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

11. George H. and Cynthia Z. Ritko requests a variance 
of 9.7 feet to a 0.3 foot side yard setback (east side) in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (deck) on Lots 45 and 46, 
Block 10, Salt Marsh Point, 1304 Preserve Drive. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

12. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Burnett requests a variance of 20 
f«t to a 30 foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet as 
required on Lot 18, Tract D, Section 3, Sandbridge 
Beach, 3668 S. Sandfiddler Road. Pungo Borough. 

13. Jerry L. and Deborah A. Ferren requests a variance 
of 6 f^t to a 14 foot side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 20 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot Z, 
Gum Bridge, 1944 Gum Bridge Road. Pungo Borough 

14. ^an T. Gregory requets a variance of 10 f^t to a 5 
foot side and rear yard setback (northeast corner) in- 
itead of 15 feet each as required (accessory building) on 
U3t 2, SectioB 3, Bay Colony, 1324 N. Bayshore Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Scott E. and April P. Miner requests a variance of 9 
feet to a I foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 10 
feet as required (deck) on Lots 39 and 40, Block 10, Salt 
Marsh Point, 1316 Preserve Drive. Lynnhaven 
ftn-Qugh. 



PubHc NMring 



MMc HMring 



16. Tom O'Brien Contractor, Inc. requests a variance of 
20 feet to a 30 foot front yard setback instead of 50 feet 
as required on Lot 8, Tract D, Section 3, Sandbridge 
Beach, 3628 S. Sandfiddler Road. Pungo Borough. 

17. Dr. Harold J. Levinson requests a variance of 20 
feet to a 10 foot setback from the 15 foot alley adjoining 
the easty property line instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot) on Lot 6 and 18, Block 23, Croatan Beach, 
S. Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 

18. Dockside Associates, by F. Wayne McLeskey 
requests an appeal to waive or modify the condition that 
the two (2) open canopies approved by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on March 5, 1980 not be enclosed on a 
6 acre-Parcel, Lynnhaven Colony, 2128 N. Great Neck 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . Arthur A. Dy requests a variance of 9 parking spaces 
to 10 parking spaces instead of 19 parking spaces as 
required (restaurant) and to allow vehicular 
maneuvering directly incidental to entering or leaving a 
parking space into a public street or alley where pro- 
hibited on Lot 3, Block 12, Virginia Beach Develop- 
ment, 205 nth Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 

2. Ronald J. Novak requests a variance of 2 feet to a 3 
foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 5 feet as 
required and of 1 foot to a 9 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (accessory building) on Lot 
21, Block 51, Aragona Village, 713 DeLaura Lane. 
Bayside Borough. 

3. A. T. Leidy, III requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a front yard setback on Lot 12, Block 20, 
Chesapeake Park, Lauderdale Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

W. L. Towers 

Secretary ' 

171-3 2T 11/10 VB 



Legal Notice 



I, Robert J. Rustenbach, 
will no longer be respon- 
sible for any debts of Ger- 
trude A. Rustenbach con- 
tracted after February 12, 
1982. 

Robert J. Rusetenbach 
3904-202 Lakefront Circle 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23432 
171-4 2T1 1/10 VB 



Divorces 



VIRGINIA: IN THE 
CLERK'S OFFICE OF 
XHE CIRCUIT. COURT 
OF THE CITY OF NOR- 
FOLK 

On the 25th day of Oc- 
tober 1^82 Marie M. Bleus 
Complainant 
vs. 
Frantz Bleus Defendant 

The object of this suit is 
for the complainant to ob- 
tain from the defendant a 
divorce a vinculo 
matrimonii upon the 
grounds of one year 
separation without 
cohabitation or inter- 
ruption. 

An affidavit has been 
made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident 
of this State, it is ordered 
that he answer in writing 
on or before the 14th day 
of December, 1982 and 
protect his interests 
herein. It is ordered that 
this order be published 
once a week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun a 
newspaper published in 
the City of Norfolk, 
Virginia. 
Teste: 

HUGH L. STOVALL, 
Clerk 

By Caven Knight, D.C. 
Arthur G. McGowan p.q. 
169-134T11/4VB 

Biser 

Joins 

Continental 

Virginia Beach rmdeat 
Keith Biser has been ap- 
pointed communications 
consultant with Contii^a- 
tal Telephone. Virginia 
Beach. 

Previously, Biser 
worked 13 years with Clif- 
ton-Forge Waynesboro 
Telephone ComiMUiy. He 
held several positions in- 
cluding linemen, central 
office reimir, and com- 
munications c<nuuttant. 
Biser also worked ine yen- 
with United TelephoM 
before coming to Coo- 
tinental. 

Biser ami to mU 9m 
have two cUMna: JoA 



"A man ought to read just 
as inclination leads 1dm, 
for what he reads as a taslc 
will do him little good." 

Samuel Johnson 



Reason 

To 

Smile 

They've got a reason for 
smiling. Even in this con- 
strained economic en- 
vironment the owner, 
Linda Johnke, of Country 
Shops in Virginia Beach, 
and fellow merchants, ar- 
tists and craftsmen have 
decided to satisfy the hun- 
dreds of customers wishes, 
tourist and permanent 
alike, and publish a 
catalog of many of their 
very special items for 
Christmas. These Virginia 
Beach merchants are in 
large measure responsible 
for the special Antique 
Guide run in the Sun each 
week. 



Hudgins Co. 
To Build 
New Medical 
Facility 

Lester Hudgins, Jr., 
president, Hudgins Con- 
struction Co., Newport 
News, has announced that 
Hudgins Construction has 
been awarded a contract 
to construct the Inter- 
national Medical 
Associates Building on 
Independence Boulevard 
in Virginia Beach. 

The finished structure 
will cover 20,000 square 
feet and will cost ap- 
proxin ately $1.25 million. 
Warner, Finch and Barnes 
are the project architects. 




From left to right are Debbie Maloney, Befanas; Bryan Smith, Res. Artist; Carol 
Harris, Stencil Crafts; Michael Moylan, Coantryside Cross Stitch; Vicky Davis, The 
Quilting Bee; Joseph Werie, Woodstuffs; Rose Shelley, Countryside Kitchen; and 
Linda Jahnke, Countryside Shops. 



GEORGIA'S 
HAIRSTYLES 



468-3440 

, lAOIIt: 
0*11% Mita V*Hr 'Smp 
OnCator TVt 



K> 



iMTROMicTaiiv ma facial 

OtLO^MlMr rH»PCut& I 

■KMCAIIiMMMIIM* { glow Qr^ .. >#.M I 

MferilMt, I Cut ....-...■ *3.00 I 

<B«M««vi*««a| f Sh«nfip00& I 

\ptHM aavisi I 8«t ••• '••ooi 

'lBi»«M...*BT**i I H8HX:utl!k I 

k/ind CutnowOryortit I | Set ........ *t.00 | 

%ipimOcl.31.1M2^ I .BmlniOct31,19t2 ^ 




ANDS 




Aiir 



What do our hands tell us? 

A child's hands — smooth, pliable, soft and beautiful — 
speak of iimocence. 

Hie lianas of youth — ^restless, finger-shapplng, iliylhiH-' 
beating — are searching for answers. 

A mother's hands are firm, capable, yet gentle. Dad's 
hands are big, strong — they represent authority. Grand" 
mother's hands are wrinkled and veined — they tell us ab- 
out kneading bread . . . and praying. An old man's hands are 
gnarled and crippled, crossed on a cane, waiting. 

Praying hands, worlcing hands, little hands, old hands 
all grapple with the problems of life. 

Some problems are too great to solve alone. It takes a 
helping hand . . . outstretched to your hand. 

With outstretched hands the Church welcomes you, 
seeks you, extends a joyous invitation to worship God. 



Backstage BoutiquC^Ltdl 

D(UKe-Gymnastici 

Fitness Apparel 

Theatrical Props and Supplies 

Mon.-Fri. 10to6 

Sat. 10 to S 

497-4579 

323 Kempsville Plaza 

Shopping Center 

Princess Ani^Jtoad' 

Near WitcMacIt Road 

Virginia BeSch 



Economy Upholstery 

Today's Fabrics & 
Yesterday's Prices! 
Hurley Monciu, Owno- 

483-6747" 

5633 Shoulders Hit' Road 
2 Miles North ofChurchland 



STITH UPHOLSTERY 
SHOP,INC. 

•Recovoring & Upholstery 

•RqMirs ft Refinishing 

•Custom Restyling 

FreeE^mates 

545-5571 

1 121 CamposteUa Road 
At Indian Riv^Rowi 

Qnllt^oppe 

•Curtains*Quilting and clothing 

material 

•Full line of supplies for 

Quilting ft Crafts 

"New Oasscs Monthy" 

1824 &igle Ave. 

3 Hocks SouUi ot 

UKtinockNratfaof 

Billy's Bk B.Q. One Nock 

off Military Highway 

420-1715 



Sonthport Etectik Co. 

Electrical Contractors 
Reskkntiel A CtmmenM 
.NcwWktag 



Civyri^ 1962 KMMr AdvwtHmg SwwiM 
P. O. Bw ma*. dWlMlwvM*, Virgma aSfO 



I by Th« Amolem BIbto SectMy 



545-3367 

1302 Bdri>ridge Blvd. 
SwthNorfcdk 

MUI-EM 
Carpel Shop 

4?40Vir^niaB(«diBKrd. 
Vir^iaBea^ 

497-4854 



Sundiqr 
Matthev 
18:15-;^ 



Monday 
Matthew 
20.1-16 



Tuesday 

Acts 
10:25-43 



Wednesday 

I Corinthians 

1:10-18 



Thursday 

GaJatians 

4:21-31 



Friday 

GoJations 

6:10-18 



Saturday 

Ephesions 

i:4-13 



TaftorB.Carr 
dEmphnifi 



/ 



?>% ^ h«^ H? ^^ 't' ^' 1? ^' V '^ 1? <^ V <^ V ?«^ "v <^fc^ 



Max'tnmtKnttt 

•H<M>y items 

• Fbteheditons 

• MoiMkly dimes 

Mob. -ra. 10 to 9 

468-3416 

II2S (kwm Run Squart 
Sal.U-«aa.l4 

OvwlM*gfttal(et 

14l9IHiiBiiaicratt«et 



Tke ter-B-QM ■■» 

•D«^ LMcbeon SpecWs 



Tlm€>9mmm%mMmi^yem 



Im "Pig Piek'im" 

lU. l7altteliM|ita 
ToMBceMcCe. 
8^-3111 



Ei4lMcri^»fo«a,lM. 

l-700E.Lftaty&. 

ChcsapeakT. VA 23324 

Chala 41 Dwmhy Haekwwth 

mdSl^ 

ri i napn l n &ivhy a Lwh. 

ToSerwYmt 
PrteOflM. 

^7-^1 

Amid Name /^^ma$ 
TVi, Sm^m 



^niidp 

nULadteRowt 

4^-^l 

L.H.Bms4ka^ 

Ja^y'sH^ PedgMri 

> 9da Cut • lU^n fto&Kto 

• 1 



a6-»M 



The Hdr People 

MeH...W0imH...CklUfen 
PernMiwMB, CMorvm. ^Nng 

T^, wd Tkm. Bvmin^ 

SMOPtoH^taeelkMd 
pMfWdS^we 
Virgtitettack 






Tr% 



/ 



^ 



^86-3430 



VirgtakiBewda&in,Novenber3,19S2 19 





ELBOKSAMYiCaOOi. 
ra(m9CTNO.IM9 

ADVEKIVDiENT flMIIIDS 

Slate ^ra!^U»4A 

The Sdwoi Bomi of tke Ctty of 

VkghdaBnch, Owner 

Soled UAt for tbe lite im- 
provtmeou to€ Weit ICeoiiwvffle 
El^mmfij School for the 
Scliod Board of the City of 
Yitgi^ Bcadi. Virgioia Beadi. 
IHi^ida will be received by B. E. 
pridceU, S^^criaieadcnt at the 
ofBoe of S^ool Adaaialttntion 
BuOdiiig, Pi^ee« Aime StatiOB, 
Vlrgiiria Beadi. VlriiBtai until 
30:00 o'dodc Local PrendUng 
Time on 8 Novcmba 1982 aui 
then at Mid office publicly 
opened and read aloud. 

The procedure fw withdrawal 
ot bUi shall be aooonBng to 
Chapter 4. Sedlon 11-20.2(1) of 
dieCWie<rfVlqfa^ 

The Oenend Contract it to be 
awarded on a hunp nun baiii 
and iadiMies all work ai defined 
in the CbtinA Documents. 

Drawfaiss and I^Mdfications 
m^ be seen at the Dodge Plan 
Boom. Norfolk, ^rignia, the 
Bnilden and ^Contraftwi Ex- 
diange, Norf^. Vi^inia. the 
Dodge Plan Room, Kidimond, 



L 

O 

O 

K 

I 

N 

G 

A 
R 
O 
U 

N 
D 



AODmONS 
WMowi, Aaj lypt Of 



R.H. BLACK 

39M459 m-nn 




Vii^iida and the BuOders Ex- 
change of Richmond, Inc., 
RfcfamoBd, Vir^nia. and at the 
office of the Architect. WaUa, 
Todd and Sadcr, Arahltec^. 
Inc.. 1120 Laddtt Road, Vi^iia 
Beach, Virginia 234S1, ., 
Tdeidioae (804) «a-2468. 

Sets of Drawings and 
SpedHcatJoos may be otahwd 
ai the office of the AnMect 
upm andicatioa a cc om panied 
\V a dqxidt of $30.00 per set. 
l^on reodpt of the ccm^ele set 
ofcfaawingi and speciikatirau, 
within 10 days after the bid 
opddng date, deposits wfll be 
r^ftoided in fUl to Coatnctors 
who submit bids, and $13.00 to 
oUmts. FaUure to return the 
comi^ete sets wiAin iO d^rs wOI 
constitute forfeiture of the 
deposit. 

Bid Security: A bidda's bond 
or certified check will be required 
in ibt amount of not tess than 
five percent of the Base Bid. The 
bid bond diall be executed on 
AIA Documestt A310, or in the 
same form, and for a period of 
not ten than 30 days after the Ud 
opening date. Bond or check 
shall be payaUe to the Sdiool 
Board of the City of Vi^inia 
Bewdi. 

The Owner reserves the rigitt 
to wavie informalities and to 
reject any or all bids. 

Bidders' irttentioo is invited to 
the requirements of Htle 34, 
QupUt 7, of the Code of 
^rginia pertaining to 
re^sbatiM. 
The SdMtri Board 
oftheOtyof 
Viifinia Beach 
13T 11/10 

LISTEN AND LOffi -weight 
without dieting. Rquogram 
your subconscious. It works. 
Send S12.98 to Positive Behavior 
Devdopment, 1379 S. Majn 
Street, Chambersburg, PA 
17201. 

I-4T-11/10 



2* PWvMIMS 



NEBS J^UAMuE RIOE^o 

Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Mon- 
day thru Friday. 6 a.m. 
Roeemont Road area. Will pay 
f« half of gas. C^ 34(^127 af- 
ter 3:30. 

MT-11/3 

■ECQVE A MASTCRCAU) 

OR Visa. Guaranteed, nobody 
reftned; for free brochure call 
House of Credit, toll free 1-800- 
442-1331 anytime. 
21TN 

■ECZIVE A MASTERCARD 

or Visa. Guaranteed, nc^Mdy 
refused; for free brochure c^ 
House of Credit taXi free 1-800- 
442-1331. 

24Tn-17 



4.AiitM 



CADILLAC • '79, Sevilh. 

68,000 NOles. kNuied, good cm- 

moo, light bhie. »tBO, 42^ 

2339 

*-«T-ll/IO 

LyNX-1981. cxceik»t cosiMott, 
wWte. $4900. Ciril423-3im 

4-lT.ll/l 

CilEVY-1980, Mhwza, 2 do«. 
am/fro 8 track, 4 cj^ndtf , pwd 
oogas. Good condition. 13,000. 
CM42240». 

44T-11/24 



vanwinhlei 



took a W0ll'd^9r¥9d nmp and 
M th9 Gl99$ltM» do ttm work. 

Find • iob. buy • car stll a hout* . . . th« daily 
cl«aNi«d ads can do it all and a whola let mora. 

Buying or aalUng. thay workl 



CHEVY-1980 hkmxt, 2 door, 
ara/te 8 track, 4 cylinder, ^wd 
ongtt. Good condition. 13^000. 
Can422-90». 

4-«r-ll/24 

FORD CUSTOM-1966, 289 

en^e, automatic transmisricM, 
4door. AU Miconl, runs great, 
tooks peat, no rust. Motor has 
nevCT been ^ooe mto. Power 
train great. Less than 88,000 
irnks, all ori^nal. CoUeiAon 
item. $1200 wiU talk tmde. Call 
Dave at 347-4371 betwen 9 and 
S or aitCT 3^:30 caU 493-0990. 

4-TFN 

FIREBIRO-1974, 6 cylinder, 
ara/fm cassette. Runs good, 
SHOO. Call 833-9067. 

4-rr-u/3 

DATSUN-1978, 510 station 
wagon, all options, excellent 
condition. Blue book value 
S3873 win leU for $3400. Call 
547-«32. 

4-1T-11/3 

MUSTANG-1977 Ghia. air, 
automatic, power steoing and 
Ivakes, rear window drfrost, 
new tires am) battery, real dean. 
$2600. Call 397-4744. 

4.1T-I1/3 



5.Tnwkt 



CMC - "79 Sierra Grande Street 
Coupe, 2 tone maroon and 
oranfe, 60,000 miks. See to ^|>- 
predate, loaded, 4 new LR60 
Remingten Radials, $4200 or 
best offer. 428-8013. 
3 4T 10-17 

F(HUV1973 i^kup, automatic 
transmission, wagon wheels, air 
shocks, good running conditim. 
$1700. CaU 347-2338. 

3-2T-11/10 



8. ■Mto 



CARLSON JET BOAT - 1978, 
23 foot, cuddy cabin. Tandem ' 
lyaUcr, low hours and fast, 
i^cing $6,983. Call 460-3373. 
After 3 caU 481-0096. 
8-TFN 

IS' FIBERGLASS BOAT- 

Evinrade motor, traiter indudml. 
All in good shape. Must sdl. 
$730 or best off«. Call 463-4330. 



ICIMpWtNtoi 




OEORC3ETOWN 
POINT 

Home sit&for mik 
for 

SALES orrKX 
333i>nivMtMtlU. 



CALL464-f317 



iO. N^p WiRta4 



17. 



n.tmtB/yRNiRiM 



STDHOratAniER - for Law 
oflBoe. 9 «n to 1 p a. Fast ac- 
o^ate tyfb^ mpdred. Sand 
resume to: Outiand, Grey, 
O'Keefe and itabbnrd. P.O. Boa 
1343, Ortwprake, VA ^320 

J0-4T-I1/10 



ILNdtiMnWMtod 



GENERAL HOUSEcleaning, 
rdiaUe and eiqwrienced. C^ 
340-1389. 

UTW 



t2.lMit»0p p i iUwHy 



OWN YOUR OWN BISINESS- 

*Jean Shop 'Children's Shiv 
•Dress Shop. $3,900 to $16,300, 
In-store training. Grand 
Opening. Hxtures Installed. 
Call right nowl Mr. CKbson at 
301-329-1360. 

12-1T-11/3 

THE LOVE SHOP Flranditae 
has store owner/opoator c^jpor- 
tamity in the Va. Beach arqu For 
more Information iriease wrte 
Mid send resume to:. The Love 
Sh(V, U2» Gravd dr.. Ft. Wor--4 
th.Tx. 76118. 

12 4T 11-17 



CHAIRS • 2 livin^oom 

traditicMal 11^ Mue. ^K^eiU 

condition«i. $160. Call 482- 

5353. 

174T 11-17 

BEDROOM SET-8 pteoe con- 
temporary, indudes 2 twin beds, 
like new. $300 or best offer. 
Like new. Call 497-1242. 

17-IT-11/3 

MUST WLL MOVING • 2iic. 
bedroom set; drener w/o^ror, 4 
drawer chest, bookcase bed. All 
hardwood construction, Ught 
walnut. Excellent condition 
$323. 340-7689. 
17 4T 11-17 

3 rUXX SOLID teak^mxm 
Stereo CaMnet • 83" kmg, loa os 
storage space for tapes aad 
records. Has Sony red-to-red 
tape deck and Sony recdver 
SR603O, 30 watu per diannd. 2 
Sansui spenken, SP2000. ^Mce 
in cabinet for turntable. All tm 
'800. CaU 388-3811. 

17TFN; 



YARD 8 AU:— 920 Reitaart Ave 
^outh Norfolk), 7:30 a.m. tU 
6^p.m. 

27-IT-11/3 






llPtto 



GESMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pies - AKC roistered, for pet 
or show. $130 and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARDS. Call 488-8083. 
13-TFN 

BIRDS - EXOTIC. Taking ot- 
ders ft faiyaways. Now financing 
for Christmas. 421-9334 

13-4T-II/10 

SIAMESE RITTENS • Red 
Point, registered; champion 
nred. show quality, $200. 481- 
3338 
MTTH 

ENGUSH BVUfiOG PUP- 
PIES— 10 weeks, 2 males, 1 
female, AKC 481-6724 

13-1T-11/3 

. — ^ ^a, 

YORKSHIRE Terrier puppies - 6 
weeks. ARC, 2 females. 
4329. '■ !- A \ > 

i i34Tn> i7 

PETS-Please hdp us by giving 
a loving pei a home., Wa are a 
non-profit organizttion, but 
we wfll gladly take donations. 
We are in need of Foster Paren- 
ttforourpett. Please call 497- 
7^30, 481-6634 or 3994321 if 
you can help. Animal 
Assistance League, 

13-TFN 



IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
necklaces; Vases and Boxes. 18(M 
granby St., 623-9119. Daily 10-3. 
I8TFN 



21. T«lavisiMi/StorM 



MAGNAVOX-TV, console, very 
good condition. S300. Call 424- 

1288. 

21-4T-1I/24 



22.Jtw«lry 




LANES JEWELRY FOR SALE 

(Hm ladies cocktail ring with 43 
diamonds and is 14 carat yellow 
gtrid. Also a 14 carat w^te gold 
23 jewd ladies Bulova watch. 
Ring apivaised at $3400 and 
watch appraised at $1900. wm 
sdl dther for hdf the appraised 
value. CaU 347-0838 after 5:00 



22TFN 



Colni fitifi fItaliMai 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

Immediate openings overseas 
and domestic. 20,000 to 30,000 
plus a year. CaU 1-312-920-9673 
ext. 1447A. 

10-4T-1I/ 

BABY SITTER-One child. 
Early evening ft some weekoids. 
South NorfoUc area. 343-0162. 
lO-lT-11/3 

$186 DAILY-eamings working 3 
hours a day at home. Your ear- 
nings fuUy piaranteed in writii%. 
For craii^te detiafls and ap- 
[rficatiiMi, i^ose send a sdf ad- 
Avned envelope to: E.V., ZQC 
Rooco Dr., Harrisonburg, VA 
22801. 

104T-11/24 

YOU SAW US ON PM 

kftapotoe/Tod^r Sww. Now 
see na in your home. Ibva a 
bonw bigtfle party or beoooe an 
UNneiU^OVERWARB Mm. 
Oa^Mtyoofiacttf 1-2454764. 
__^ KHT-ll/lP 

WANTED SALES- 

Rqwcsentadve tot Norfolk aad 
Vii^irfa Beach. Abodeakrsfor 
' toys, gi^, dactrwii cs, heart and 
nmiring at gun anteed sales 
priras. Inquire at L ft L 
Distributors, 9912 Warwick 
Blvd., NcwpOTt IHmt, VA 
23602. <k Can 877-2939. 

KMT-11/24 



>■' 



15. 



NEEDLECRAFT INSTRUC- 
TORS wanted: Work 10-12 
hours perweek, earn 70-100 
commission. Set your own 
hours! NO DELIVERIES. NO 
INVESTMENTS, NO 

COLLECTING. Complete 
training. Car and Phone 
necessary, ART CRAFT CON- 
CETTS. CaU Majorie 340-3782, 
Suron 427-2064, and Jane 424- 
3044. 

23-4T-I1/10 



TAPPON STOVE-has child 
proof switches, automatic 
timers, frost-free Hot Point 
refrigerator, equipped for 
automatic ice maker. Both 
avocado, both in good con- 
dition. $223 each or wQI sell 
both for $430. CaU 423-0237. 

I5-IT-11/3 

MIYER-Maytag. white, 6 mon- 
ths old, gas, excdlent condition. 
$193. Qa49iM)845. Best time is 

13-IT-11/3 



24.IVMrtadT«lqf 



ICArtlelatFarSdt 



WELL DROUUM: rig • Por- 
table, wiU go any where. 
RonovaUe axd. 100 fe^ of pipe 
and dps. $1493. Qdl 343-0203 or 
4234722. 
16ff 11-17 

TOOLS AND TOC». BOX to be 

s(4d <m rtovaANr M, J9n at 5 
p.m. - 108 iteivaviUe ItoaA. 
164T11-4 

UMINGTON-Pump, $125. 
CaU833-88M. 

16.1T-11/3 

WEIMMI^ MUSS • Sze 12 
VcB and rt^d train. exceUent 
ammOoB. $100. Catt«442»2. 
l64Tll-n 



JUNK CARS Wrecked or run- 
ning, cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiat<vs and bitttcries. 
7 days a wedc. QUI 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 340-1039. 

24TFN 

CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, diina. oil pain- 
tings, orientd rags, do iron and 
latiqiM toys. We buy one inece 
or entire housefuUs. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU 422-4477 
brtween 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



25.6M«ThhigsT*Eat 



FRESH TURKEY'S • Locally 
raised and dremd. $1.30 lb. Or- 
ia now for Ihankjijving and 
Christmas. Carey Poultry Farm. 
467-3078, 467-0231, or 461-1380. 
23 4T 11-17 



2S. ERtartriMMRt 



POR SALE-70 BaUronn dance 
Cdl Larry Punn for 
informadoo 480-2134. 

26-TFN 



n»UHm9i9trim 



FRUIT T«EES-Nut trees, berry 
plantt, gr^e Wnes, la nd sca ping 
plant mMerid-onmd tqr one of 
Viqinia's kr^st growers. '¥nc 
cavy of 48 page Plaadag Guide 
Cttdog in color on request. 
Waynes Boro Nurseries, Inc., 
Waynesboro. Va. 22980. 

2MT-11/24 

ACntm TREE SERVICE - A 

professional conqdete tree ser- 
vice. 20 years expeikooe. 
Licensed and hisured. Ffte 
estimate. CaU399-TOIl. 
ffiJIN 

MULCai-4UTUER AND S(H4 

9iredded wood and bark har- 
dwood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We ddiver in one 
day. 833-0230 or 833-7467. 
29TFN 

JOYNER PROPESSIONAC 
LANDSCAPIPW and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 343-4949. 

29TFN 



32.lMiRM8FarRaRt 



STORES AND STORAGE 

AREAS - AU sizes. Properties 
uidimited. Marvin Ooldfarb. 
399-8390. 484-1273. 

32TFN 



33. Am * Irh b U Far Hart 



AFARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
l^xauions, one and 2 bedroran 
qjartmmts. From IfO. Rcntd 
office, 482-3373, evening 48^ 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



34.RaaMF«rRaiit 



HOUSE TO SHARE in 

Chcsiqieake. $130 a mOnth plus 
^^ 'WSHtieai - ' -Non-smoker 
prefored. 488-3893 

344r 11-17 



3*. RmI Estate 



ST.UtoFarSila 



VDK^IA H;M»-Cape Story 

fay the Sea. S».900. Byown«. 
CbH 213-732-1876 for more in- 
fonnation. 

37-4T-I1/24 



RARE OPPORTUNfFY 

Buy a Home at Your Own Price. 
26 Houses ft 2 Building LoU 
SeUing IndividuaUy at AUC- 
TION Sat.. November 20th, 
10:00 a.m. EASTERN SHORE, 
VIRGINIA, Located throughout 
Accomac County and 2 in Nor- 
thampton County. These 
pr<q>erties wiU be avaUable tor 
immediate possession, since title 
is held by and the sale is being 
conducted for Farmers Hcune 
Administration. DweUing uzcs 
vary from iOO to 1100 sq. ft. 
Lot sizes vary from 15,000 to 
20,000 sq. ft. Condition varies 
from some houses ready for oc- 
cupancy to some in need of com- 
plete remodding. Estimated 
Values range from $5,000 to 
$20,000. AU properties indude 
separate wcUs and a^tic systems 
and are located on paved state 
rMds. ATTENTIONI HOME 
OWNERS - INVESTORS - 
CONTRACTORS - HAN- 
DYMEN - HOLDERS OF 
RENTAL PROPERTIES. Sale 
Loottion: Eastern Shore Com- 
numity CoUcte Lecture HaU, 
Mdfa, Virginia. TERK&- I0« 
Deposit Sale Day in Cadi or 
Certified Wmdt, Glance in Cash 
at Closing within 30 days or 
Terms AvailaUe for appUcanU 
anrfyii^ prior to sde day. AU 
Sdcs Subject to Immediate Con- 
firmation by Farmers Home 
Administration. For Detaitod 
Brodiures IiKduding IndivMual 
Photographs and Exact 

Locations, CONTACT 

OWNBY AUCTION ft 
REALTY CO., INC. 1301 Her- 
ndtage Rd., Richmcmd, Va. 
Telephone 804-358-8493 (An 
Equal Houang Opportunity) 

36-3T-1I/17 



g gAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE g 

FIREPLACES | 

CUSTOM BUILT ? 

ALL SP^IAL, roR SAfET¥*S SAKE^ 

t 

I 

t 




FREE ESTIMATE & INSPECTION 

340-7219 

Oc^an Builders 

'^jR^aur E^mpo-s, Crsck^ Rrebrick, QtK:ks I 



And CluDuiey Caps 



I SAVE SAVE M^ SAVE ^UOt SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE &iVB M^ SAVE SAVE m 






IMXMIE TAX - and Accoun- 
tii« 0achKSng tax audiu). Mario 
Venditti, forawr Rcvemie Agent. 
3707 ^qb^ Beach Bhrd. (near 
RosemoM Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
38 13T 1-12 

ROOXXEEPING-Monthly 

bal&KC sheet. P ft L, ctetaUed 
trial balance f rtmi your checks 
and reccipte. Mubs. or register 
tapes. 94rs and VA-3's. Up 
te 200dicckbO(A transactions 
monthly: *43. Payables, 
recdvable. small payroU. 
Chesapeakf only. CaU ^0- 
6623. 
. 39-TFN 

BOCHONG KRVICE -induding 
quarterly payroU r^rts and 
bank account reconciUation. 
-SpedaUzing in smaU proprdtor- 
ships. Pick up and deUvery. 
Retired professional. CaU 420r 
3624. 

•« 39TFN 



TYPING-AU kinds, resumes, 
term papers, 10 years npoience. 
Reasonable Rates! Upon 
request, 7 days a week. CaU 345- 
0607. 

40-4T-11/24 

PLUMBING-PersonaUzed ser- 
vice, reasonable rates. AU type 
repairs, installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
terizing. Special rates on drain 
deaning. Free estimates. AU 
work piaranteed, quaUty work. 
CaU 497-0374, day or night. 
Emergency service. PAUL 
DAVIS PLUMBING. Licensed. 
404T-11/24 

■OOKEEiTER - WiU do bot>k^ 
in my home. Experiencedt in 
payrool and quart^ly returns. 
Pick-up and deUVery servjce. 
CaU 343-4096 after 3 p.m. for 
more information and rates. 

40TFtif 

SPEOAUZING IN TRIPS to 

airport or driving dderly to shop 
and do errands. CaU 497-4794. 
40 4T 11-17 

TYPING SERVICE • For ' 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonable rates. CaU dther 
467-7112, Ken^tvUk area, or 
463-0236, HUtc^i/Pembroke - 
ca. 

401>. 



41.CarpMtiy 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING, 
ROOFING - and aU types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 4208433. 

«TFN 



42.aMCM« 



42.aMCii« 



: 



CHILDCARE-Indian River 
area. Age 2 and up. Cdl 424- 
7211. 

4MT-11/3 



4C Firaplacas 



FIREPLACES - Custooa bulk. 
Also repairs on dampers, 
firebricks, cracks, ete. 340-7219 
anytime. 
46 4T 11-10 

nUPLACES - Custom buUt. 
also repain on damper tin 
bricks, cracks, ete. CaU 340- 
7219 anytime. 

46-4T-11/10 



47. 



ADDITIONS.- ROOM8- 

carpentry, roofing, siding, 
storm window, stivm doors, 
plastering, electric, concrete 
work, plumbing, guttering, 
ranodding, kitchen and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluminum siding, firplaces, 
carpeting pdoing, qxdaUzing 
in parking areas aiid drivevrays, 
aU type of demdition, free' 
estiniBte without obliyUlon, 
pronqit service. Serving aU of 
Tidewstter. Bonded and In- 
sured, State Regittoed. CaU 
623-7433. 623-6148, or 499- 
3316. 
47-TFN 

WE DO ALL types ceramic tile 
work and aU types of hcmie im- 
provements. Free estimates. 
490-9102. 

47-4T-1I/IP 

E. J. SIDING - SpedaUstt in 
vinyl ft duminum siding, storm 
doors, windows ft guttoing. 
Experienced mechanics. Free 
estimates - low prices. CaU 499- 
1391 or 543-7737. 
47-fr -||/lQ 

ADDITTONS - Rooms, glniges,' 
convert garages, decks, etc. 
iQudity work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimated. CaU 340- 
2511 anytime. 

47TFN 



43.lRslracliaR/EdRcallaR 



STOP LIVING IN FEAR 

Oomphte Oqg lYiinfaw: 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation. 
CaU 804481-6999. 

48TFN 



SI. 



WALLPAPERING AND 
FAINTING - Fast and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
ntehed. Call us for a free 
fenate. Arthur and Qmipany 
Redecorating Contractus. 420- 
3478. 
_^ 31TFN 

PAINTING - Lar^ ot smalt 
jobs. Interior and exteriw. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References avaUable upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
waUpapering experience. Call 
897-3483 or 484-1423. 

31TFN 



CHILDCARE-My home. wUl 
tent snacks. Prefer days. CaU 
387-3873. 

«-IT-ll/3 

CHILDCARE-My Virginia 
Beach home, fenced yard, 
playmates. wUl serve macks and 
meals. WiU sit any time. CaU 
340-2225. 

42-4T-11/24 

BABYSITTING-My home. 
^iiva Oaks Area) fenced yard, 
wiU serve snacks and meals, 
playmates, reasonable rate. CaU 
833.5830. 

4MT-I1/3 

CHILDCARE • My home, 
anytime, drop-in's ««ioame, wUl 
serve snacks aad meals. 
Reas(»aUe rMes. QM 480-4614. 
«4T 11-17 



BATOROOM REMQIMELING ^ 

OU and ndw. Specializing in 
ceramic tik waUs and^fiow 
coverii^. Reas<mat^ rates. Free 
estimates. 20 years expeioice in 
T^lewater area. SmaU and W^ 
jobs. Guarantee aU work. CaU 
547-4774 anytime. 

33TFN 



UTILITY SHED-dectronically 
equipped, doted in, 10* by 9'. 4 
tires, aU wood, great for hauling 
furniture or «K>od. $630. Can be 
seen at Aragona Auto thrift. 
CaU 499.0843. 

60-1T-I1/3 

TBE AND RM • F78-14, new, 

aevCT used. $30. (^ 343-a2(» or 

423-Om. 

604TU-I7 

CHESAPEARE MOMMUAL 

Gardens. Four grave dtes in 
Qaiden of tiie Word and 36 x 
13" te<»ze marker. (My $1,^>S. 

CM5^a4ms. 

tO^ 11-17 



BnOdliv or Re|H^«d, You Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Spedallsts 
•ByQ^V OHttK«««^offK^vp«^OHaaes 
•BiA SjawMetHRoom Ail^teg 

55-7318 




mimi 



riMaattaaaaMai 



20 Vir^nia Beach Sun, November 3, 1982 




Renault Alliance 



An affOTdable Euro- 
pean sedan with elec- 
tronic fuel injection, twin 
axial rear t(»^si(»i bars, 
four-wheel independent 
suspension and Euro- 
pean perfcH-mance and 
handling. 

The new Renault Al- 
liance DL Powered by 
an aluminum head 1.4 
litre engine with Bendix 
singlepoint fuel injec- 
tion. An (Hi-board com- 
puter m<HiitOTS fuel feed 
to provide precise res- 



ponse through five 
superbly ratioed gears. 

Alliance DL, Front 
wheel drive from the 
world's all-time leader ia 
front wheel drive. And 
an integrated group of 
roed-hdding compo- 
nents . Of course there's 
independent McPherson 
front suspension and 
rack and pinion steering. 
But also an entirely aew 
twin axial tn-sion bar/tr- 
ailing arm rear suspen- 
sicm that's more efficient 



than leaf springs or 
(xals. Fore and aft st»bi- 
lizer bars and steel-bel* 
ted radiate are aho stan- 
dard. 

Evropcaa E^inecrfaf 
iyiiamxIX. Nearly 
one and, a half million 
hours of development 
and testing and over 
$200 million invested in 
American Motor's Ken- 
osha assembly plant 
have produced a sopfai- 
cated small sedan of 
European breeding and 



American mamil 
Renault has ei 
computers extei 
Oroughout the 
process. First, 
ment analysis in 
the structural 
and helps pare 
Hien a UNISUIU^ 
form surface) 
probe "reads'* the 
dfications of the desi 
model and trans I 
them - witlun a ttnthi 
millimeter - (tirectly 
the die that produces \ 
Alliance body parts. 




Virginia's Largest 
Wins Five Star 
Quality Award 



Greenbrier Chryslw-Plymouth, Inc., Virginia's 
largest Chrysler, Plymouth, Imperial, Van World, 
AMC, Jeep and Renault d^er, has come a long 
way since purchasing the old Wynne Franchise in 
June 1979. 

During this short period of time, Greenbrier 
won the Five Star Quality Service Award, Chrysler 
Corporation's highest award of service. More 
recently, the dealership received Chrysler's 
National "Award for Excellence." This 
prestigious award is based on a dealership's slaes 
performance, their facilitl», customer service, 
dealership administration and their community 
relations program. These criteria are applied over 
a full year of operations, which makes the award 
very difHcult to win. 

When Greenbrier purchased the AMC, Jeep, 
Renault franchise a short time ago, they built a 
New Sales Facility and Service Area to ac- 
comodate the increased auto sales and service 
department patronage. Greenbrier offers a full 
choice of American Motors Cars, Jeeps, Kenaults 
and a parts and service department with a 
professionally trained staff ready to serve the 
public. 



Get the Great Pair to stop wear. 




^,,^;-— — >^ Motor craft Oil and Oil Filter. 



2717 Virginia Beach Blvd. 486-2717 



SUPER SIX 
PACK SALE: 

5 quarts of Motorcraft Super Premium Motor Oil 

and One FL-IA Filter For Only ^p. ma 

' »7.70incMcs $3.50 rebate / , 

from Motorcraft 

EXPj;^ 11-30-82 



:m. 



(reguterly»17.00) 



End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 




J, We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES buying a convertible 

DON'T MISS THIS SALEI 




$iooo 

BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 




v^in 



3443 Virginia Beach Hvd. 
Virginia Beach 



4d3-6100 



ITHINK 



ThMc Savhtgt M 

Thittk S^BcHon e 

ThMk Service 



Bomiw Bu§ck 
Btumwr BvMc 
Bylck 




1992 
SKYLAim 



'1632 





sicYmwK 7228 



1992 
CENTURY 

'1900 



THINK 



»> 

mm 




AND YOU 
ILL 

*a»-jm BUYI 




KIMNACH FORD 

TRUCK SALE 



SAVE 

»500-*2000 



1982 OR 1983 

F-SERIES 
RANGER 
BRONCO 

VANS 



GET OUR LOW CHEVY 
PRICE AND OUR HIGH- 
FLYING OFFER NOW... 
A ROUND-TRIP TICKET 
FOR TWO ON 
EASTERN AIRLINES 

You've never seen an offer like this before! Just 
buy or order a new Chevy Chevette, Citation, or 
selected new S-10, CIO or LUV truck before 
November IS, 1^2, and we'll give you a roun- 
dtrip ticket for two on Eastern Airlines. Choose 
one of 116 citMs in the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico, 
Bermuda, the Bahamas and the Caribbean. Come 
in soon and get all the details. 

Participating d«ila-s contribute $173 to this 
IM-c^ram. Hiis may affect ycm vtM^ cost, so 
make your best dni. 

BUY NOW AHO fVi 




1000 




KIMNACH FORD 

6401 £. Vii^nte B^ch Mrd 

awt €Mt Hmrtmm M. Exit) 

461-6401 



KLINE 
CHEVROLET 



^(Htulo with Full Cabriolet Roof 
NOW ON DISPLAY 

ALL 1983 MODELS 



S. MILITARY HWY. A GKOMmBI KO. 
CH^APEAKE 



MtlNE 




5524 Virgiiiia ^h ttvd. 
Va. B«Kh. Va, 49^^331 



•■i 



REBATESON SELECTED UNITS! 

SALE-SALE-SALE!! 



20/ OVER 
/O RK COST 

OVER 400 CARS AND TRUCKS IN STOCKI 




S-IOs 
TAHOES 

s 1 ,ni#»#*oo 



OktwMfa MMtai 71r Or. 




In Upcoming Session 



Legislators Unlikely to 

School Elections 




By Mike Gooding 
Sun Staff Writer 

'it won't happen this year; 1983 is 
tiot tht year for passage of this 
legislation." 

So says E>el. Glenn B. McClanan of 
Virginia Beach's 84th District, 
discussing the pos»bility of Virginia's 
Ckneral Assembly passing a bill which 
would allow for the direct election of 
school board members. 

McClanan has championed the idea 
since he was first elected to the Vir^nu 
House of Delegates 10 years ago. "I 
am very much in favor of direct elec- 
tion," he said. "In fact, I cannot 
imagine why anyone would be opposed 
to it. Virginia is the only state in 
America which does not allow for the 
direct election of its schod board. And 
when you consider thiU the Sdiool 
Board spends more than 40 petotsaL of 
the city's overall budget. dir«:t eteetion 
of its members only makes sense. " 

Presently, the 11 -member board is 
appoints! to of flee by City Couiunl for 
ova-lapping three-year terms. Mem- 
bers are required by law to step down 
after having served three terms. In 



December, the terms of three Vblginia 
Beach School Board members apire. 

City Council is contonplating Asking 
the General Assonbly to "study the 
possibility" of allowing k>caUties the 
option of having lotaUy-elected school 
boards with the power to raise taxes. 
Council may make the request because 
school boards do not ptesmtXy have 
the power to levy taxes, yet they are in 
the unusual position of setting polity 
for budget expenditures without 
having to raise the revenues for those 
expenditures. Council Monday 
deferred for at least one week dedtfng 
upon its flnal "wish list" package for 
the General Assembly. 

A spokesman for Virginia Beach 
Public Schools Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell said the system's ad- 
ninittration is indifferent to the idea 
of an elected school board. "There is 
no great feeling of support or op- 
position," said Public Information 
Director Joe Lowenthal. "The 
Supointendent said he would be op- 
p<Med, however, unless the elected 
board would be given the autonomy to 

SeeYOU,Page8 




Election Wrap-Up 

Demos, GOP 
Look To Future 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

There was a time, long- 
time observers say, when 
Virginia Beach was known, 
as a Republican 
stronghold. 

Events in the past two 
elections have, however, 
done much to dispell this 
notion. Last year, 
Etemocrat Charles Robb 
soundly won Virginia 
Beach's endorsement in 
his bid for the governor- 
ship. Last week, 
Democrats and 
Republicans alike were 
successful in winning over 
Virginia Beach voters. 

Senator-elect Paul S. 
Tribie, Jr., Rep. G. 
William Whitehurst, and 
Del. W. R. "Buster" 
O'Brien, all Republicans, 
won approval from 
Virginia Beach constituen- 
ts. Meanwhile, Beach 
residents sent four 



Democrats to victory: 
Delegates Glenn B. Mc- 
Clanan, Owen B. Pickett, 
J. W. "Billy" O'Brien, 
and Julie L. Smith. 

Local party chairmen 
say they are pleased wdth 
the election results, 
despite ticket splitting by 
the voters. "I guess «« 
had more believable can- 
didates," said Democratic 
Chairman Ivan MApp. 
Henry C. Morgan, Jr., his 
Republican couterpart. 
called the results "a very 
good sign for the 
Republican Party in 
Virginia Beach for the 
future." 

In the big race, the con- 
iesX. for the seat of retiring 
U.S. Sen. Harry F. Byrd. 
the Republican Tribie 
overwhelmingly defeated 
his Democratic rival, Lt. 
Gov. Richard J. Davis, 
with nearly 60 percent of 
See MIXED. Page 9 




Community Asked To Donate Gifts 



*^'^mmms IWn^d Upside Down At Xmas 



iM 




m 



urdfA 



WsBmmmm 




ressesthe 



ti mat feeling, in 

ne children" - Dorothy Davis, volunteer 
Virginia Beach Social Services 



family supports." 

Foster children arc rcfetrwl to Social S«vie« by 
concerned citizens and by those who have unex- 
pectedly found themselves in custody of children 
who WC9W left \)y parents wh» said they'd tfovm 

op never returning. At ew^liMffure the child Is 



m 



luding 
-ry 
tm 
r. The 
•aes to 
i'i age 

gittiu py iuvm 
3 or other civic 



^sroups. If for some reason there are more cbildren 

jn need of gifts than there are gifts to go around, 

Davis is called in to secure more presents, ^t 

generafiy Virginia Beaeh has not seen constimtty 

increasing numbers of foster children in the city. 

Supervisors say the rales are "unique to state and 

national statistics," They attribute the drop, 

iowevef, to the Social Services Department well 

un faojiily stabilization unity. The main objective 

.f the foster care program is to remove the child 

om any damaging situation, attempt to stabilize 

the disruptive family ccMflicts, and return the 

child tothe family as soon as pcnsible. 

Fostef care program supervisors say foster 
children are victims of a social criiM which 
doesn't recognize race nor socioeconomic status. 
In Virginia Beach the mix of male to female foster 
chyctreil is about equal. The number of white 
foster ^ildren far exceeds the number of black 
children. In addition, a sizeable number of foster 
chiklreii come frmn military humilies - families 
which are desalted as betof **away from usual 



screened by Social Services and takeo before a 
juvenile court judge to determine whether the 
child should be placed in a private or group foster 
home or up for adoption. Obviously, these ex- 
periences to which the foster child is subject, can 
by frying; espedally at Christmas. 

"The foster children are grateful for the con- 
cern that anyone shows them at that time of 
year," Woolf said. 

Watford said foster children range in age bet- 
ween infancy and 2i years of age, witih the average 
age being 14. 

It's not Kkely that the number of foster children 
is going to fall dramatically within the next few 
years, although Woolf wishes there was absolutely 
no need for foster care programs, thus erasing 
domestic disputes. 

"Our goal is to eliminate foster care," Woolf 
said, "and actually work ourselves out of a job." 

But since the pr<^lcm still persists, Watford 
finds some rdtef in the fact that Virginia Beach 
has the i^etources to deal with the problem as well 
as any city. 

"Vir^Mi ^mm iias b«!n very F^poiMive, not 
<mly to fostt* t^teen" ste a&i» **tatt i^ in 
FiRponM to taM^Bg 4ttfa<T »e«fa that piN^ hmvt 
in the com^uarity. N^ds wMh include tt^ 
IM-ovision 0{ food, ^^Her and d^^.** 

To doiufe A gift of i^fts to Viti^^ 9mA'i 

ftwfeat4««-mj. 



Councirs Reactions Mixed Over Lengthy Wishlist Headed For Richmond 



By Lee Cabin 
SaalbepotUt 
One Virginia Beach 
Council monb^ termed 
"unrealistic" the list of 



^illative proposals bdi^ 
c(»i^te«d by aty Coun- 
dl while f^m csqu-essed 
rete^titna ^knU <me or 
more of die 17 prop(»als. 



%• 



Industry Wants Water 



Industry in Virginia 
B^h as it exists wnv it 
not tlMt heavHy d^ixm- 
<^t on wa^. ac^i^iig 
to A. Jai^ DeBettu, 
dir^rtor of the city's 
economic development 
(^Mtftt^t. Mc^ of Ae 
Ught iiMtttSUial a»emb^ 
Idiots and o^i|rtei^ in 
Virfinia Beach need 
water primarily for 
drinking and sanitary 



"Tte ^BMMUt of w^bm 
fued in Lyaohavn MgSk 
u equivatait to aboit 

iiseably plants." 



But. honwver, if tlM 
d^ (toci^d to expa^ its 
«;onomic development 
^ognm to iiKlttde food 
proooudng, f<» otampte. 
a pwan^ of a kMig 
nu^ w^^ soune, tod 
at a stabte nM. wmM 
have to be WMNd b^ov 
potential industries 
i^Bldk)^iteh«e. 

"Once we tad 

tim the ^s^' Mels 

iM irouM hvw tf <E^pw- 
tmfty to MtrM^ atb» 

wmm »«»,*' DeMUs 

sml. 



Councilwoman Reba 
McCbman, at aa infonud 
sesnmi of Councfl Men- 
day afternoon, said Hust 
she has problems mtt the 
way tlM prc^KMals m^e 
0>ui^ vppmi' "It soun- 
(b like we're a bundi of 
money-hungry p<KH>le." 
Sie sttld that n^itf tim dty 
wants is diversified 
taxation authority. She 
sMd that th£ 1983 seidon 



at the Oeasal Assonbly is 
a dMft one. and "it's 
aawe to pfca^ a |»ckage 
tlw loat tod Hm involved 
in a yO^y s«sion when 
aU the l^i^Utors wiU be 
ruaalag for reaction next 
year." ^ said some im- 
profvaumt is in order as 
Conscilman Jack Jen- 
ata^ kas sug^sted. "It's 
unrealistic." she said. 
"We're askii^ few ail." 



Jennings had wanted a 
work session with local 
representatives to the 
General Assembly before 
Coundl settled on which 
prop<»als it wanted to 
submit. However, his 
motion to that effect at 
the formal session of 
Council failed by a tie 
vote. Councilman I^. J. 
Henry McCoy Jr. wm ab- 
^nt. Voting against the 



motion were Coundlmen 
John A. Baum. Robert G. 
Jon^ and W. H. Kitchin 
III; Mayor J. Louis R. 
Jones, and Vice Mayor 
Bartwra Henley. Voting 
for die motion were Jen- 
ninp. McClanan, Coun- 
cilwomen Meyera Ober- 
ndorf and Nancy Creech, 
and Coundhnan Harold 
Hdschober. 
Instead Council 



deferred action on the 
proposals until next Mon- 
day when Council mem- 
bers who want to change 
any of the proposals are to 
submit the changes in 
writing. 

Most of the propoj^s 
have to do with ways the 
city can increase its 



revenues by divo-slfying 
its taxing authority or by 
changing formulas for 
State allocations of funds. 
An 18th proposal may 
also be considered liAer. 
This would invdlve the 
reallocation of funds &m- 
flscated during a drug 

Sec CITY, Pa^ 8 



Annual Colkge ^figh1 



Virgijnia Beach City 
Schools annual Colk^ 
Ntght te ffAa^ted for 
Wednesday. Nov. 10. 
trmt 4 to I p.a., u lie 
PavMm. 

ftytrvteN' of giuiteee, 
litai. Vftmm H^^ia, 

Mid hU fHjBfll^ QSSBtM- 

tM havt planned a 
fttamoMtty 12S 



universities, military 
^1 technical 



This college infor- 
mttifla pr^am is being 
NM dvriaf National 

Ssimk mam^n en- 
mmt^ ^idMts to visit 
raJ^e/oH^ enters in 
dM Mes^ay sc^Krfs to 



oftm programs of study in 
thdr career choices. 

Questions regarding en- 
trance requirements, 
curricula, location, si», 
CMts, aiKl flnantMl aid 
WMiM be appro^iiM fw 
^m repres«itativ«. 

Financial aid infor- 
■ation sessions, coor- 
^M^ by toad <^^ 
ffmKial aid f^fwen, ut 



scheduled for 4:30, 6 to 7 
p.m; 

The atmosphere at 
Collie Night wiU be in- 
formal; each represen- 
tative will answer 
queMions and display 
ca tahy awl brochures. 
OAiiMxwnd seexmivy 
students, particularly 
junkMS. Mid their i^rrats 
are \tt^ to atteiKl. 




Foster Children Need Gifts 

The Viiii^ BcKh DepartnMnl of Sockd S»- 
vkcs is In need of grMqpa wfri indlvidwds who «#| 
prmt^ ^Ub for cfeMrai in its tmlm 
pr^ram. These are cUMren who for r 
have not been able le reaurin la tfidr I 

The clriM*s fbrt na«c airf ImI hdlU, age. and 
sex are provided to a locid dnnvh, i 
l^vidaal with two nwc^fons for 
^o^late for llnl ^c d^. Hw ^ffto we tfMi 
it^wrnxd to the DiywtaMnt of SmsM Bm^tm 
wtarv Ihey are wn^ved by a w^d worter and 
dclvN^ to the^M w foster ^ut/aL 

For f wtkcr Mwasaltoa c«M^ Doto^ C 
Itavb, DtfMTtoMrt 9t SecW Senrtns, at ^i- 
7223. __: 



i 



VUHNi 



«P 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 



Sun Commentary 







«■■ 



IHHi 



iMH 



■MP 



I B ' ' " 



Editorials 



Foster Care Costs 



• • • 

It appears that most of the social ills 
which afflict the Virginia Beach com- 
munity, and our children, stem from 
adults. But it is also the adults to whom 
the community looks for answers. 

Youth drug abuse, for example, may be 
attributed to unconcerned parents who 
have not instilled in their children a sense 
of usefuUness and purpose in life. Child 
and spouse abuse is often the result of 
adults who fail to communicate effec- 
tively between themselves and their 
children. Foster children, contrary to 
popular belief, are not always orphans or 
babies left abandoned on a doorstep. 
Rather, they are usually innocent bystan- 
ders in a family unit in need of family 
counseling. Their absence from the home 
is usually only temporary. 

These abuses cannot be magically 
disspelled. However, because of the effor-' 
ts of many people in the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social Services, and in the 
community, the pain and sorrow which 
accompanies these social injustices 
abates, succumbing to the unselfish 
energies of an enlightened few. 

Nothing can replace a foster child's 
natural parents during the holidays, and 
in some cases maybe it's better that 
they're not around to spoil this special 
time. But, if you would like to share a lit- 
tle of your heart-felt love and kindness 
children of parents who don't interact during the holiday season, your donated 
properly as to pose no threat to the well . gift to the Virginia Beach Department of 
being of their offspring, it won't be long Social Services Foster Care Children's 
before the city may be spending a million Gift Program could make a child*| 
dollars a year on the care of foster Christmas, or Hanukkah Day, a little' 
children. _,^, ^, brighter.— G.D.G. r 



The foster care program in Virginia 
Beach, a program which began in 1938 
and in most cases temporarily removes 
children from a troublesome family en- 
vironment, is now costing the city big 
bucks. 

From 1979 to 1980, the Virginia Beach 
Department of Social Services spent 
$532,416 to maintain the program. The 
money paid the expense of locating the 
children in appropriate homes, plus 
paying for other operating expenses such 
as payroll. In 1981 that figure rose to 
$648,157. In 1982 the figure bumps again- 
st three-quarters of a million dollars, top- 
ping out at $724,677. 

Foster program supervisor Marilyn 
Watford said the escalating costs were 
due. In part, to an increase in the number 
of foster children in need of more 
specialized, not routine, treatment. 

"The children nowadays are generally a 
lot more disturbed," Watford said. 
"They're not staying in regular foster 
homes. Many need more specialized 
placement." 

About one-quarter to one-third of 
foster children in Virginia Beach usually 
receive institutionalized, as opposed to 
private home, attention. Some are 
requiring "intensive therapy" which is 
costing taxpayers a bundle. 

No one denies that these children aren't 
worth every penny that is spent on them. 
But, just because the youths are the 



Water Options Open 



'•-■i^ 



As everyone knows, Virginia Beach of- 
ficials are carefully entertaining three 
separate water source options. A final 
decision on which source should 
ultimately be employed to fulfill the city's 
long-term water needs should be reached 
by the end of this year. 

The three main sources in contention 
are: The Appomattox River in Virginia; 
the Assomoosick swamp, also in Virginia 
but fed by North Carolina rivers; and 
Lake Gaston, in North Carolina. 

Each of these three options would cost the 
city between $150,000 and $250,000 to 
engage, depending on how much 
cooperation is offered by other neigh- 
boring localities which will also, someday, 
run out of water. Virginia Beach now 
purchases its water from Norfolk under 
terms of a contract which will expire in 
1993. 

The water talks have been mostly hush- 
hush. Virginians and North Carolinians 
are still discussing the political and legal 
remifications of interbasin water transfer. 
Some Tarheels are adamently opposed to 
letting outsiders lay hold to their water, 
even though it is one of nature's most 
precious natural, public commodities. 

Negotiations over water have moved at 
a snail's pace, but pressure on reaching a 
solution is building. Late last week, ban- 
ner headlines in The Virginian-Pilot 
reported that "Beach chooses lake 
(Gaston) as water source." Sources in the 
article were unnamed, but the story said 
that City Council had "secretly" tapped 
Lake Gaston as its choice for a long-term 
water supply. This article was fuelwl by 
spectulation that Virginia and North 
Carolina had arrived at an agreement 
whereby Virginia Beach could receive 
water from North Carolina provided the 
city helps to pay to remove certain algae- 
producting nutrients from North Carolina 
rivers. 

City officials do tiot deny that Lake 
Ciasion is number one on their preferred 
water source lis', but they do emphasize 
ih.it all three o|HH»t»s continue to under 
tiMisiilciaiion. 

AtcorUing lo * (arrison, chairman 



of the Virginia Beach Chamber of Com- 
merce's Water Study Task Force, the 
purported choice of Lake Gaston was 
leaked to the press. But, however, if Lake 
Gaston is Council 's choice, he is in favor 
of it. 

"I will recommend to the Chamber as 
quickly as the task force meets that the 
Chamber fully endorse the city's position 
as indicated in the newspaper," Harrison 
said. "It's extremely unfortunate, 
however, that the apparent choice was 
leaked to the press. If this is the city's 
choice and the Lake Gaston people read 
about it, it could materially affect the 
situation. It's unfortunate that some 
council members cannot keep quiet on 
these very, very sensitive negotiations un- 
til all politici^l bases have been touched." 

Mayor Louis Jones said that no final 
decision had been made, and all options 
are open. 

"Lake Gaston is still an option; not a 
decision," Jones said. 

Regarding the stories about the alleged 
choice, he said, "I don't know where or 
when the reporter got his information." 

Virginia Beach Public Utilities Director 
Aubrey Watts also confirmed that Lake 
Gaston was still just an option, not a final 
choice. 

"That's correct," he said. 

It appears as though city officials do 
not want to let the cat out of the bag, but 
that its furry little head is already 
showing. Whichever option Virginia 
Beach chooses for a water source will 
likely meet with some criticism and 
possible protest. It is expected that Lake 
Gaston residents, for example, will fight 
to keep their water from wetting the lif» 
of any Virginians. Fortunately, however, 
state officials are expect^ to intercede. 

Quietly, cautiously, local officials are 
swimming within sight of a final drcision 
of the water shortage problem. Experts 
agr^ that the water shortage is an issue 
which must t^ address^ regionally, not 
just locally. To resH^ this end, everyone, 
including the press, should not force the 
matter Such efforts could be 

damaging.— G.D.G. 



Letters To The Editor 

Kempsville Garbage 



Editor: 

Having been in business for 19 years at Kempsville 
Road and Princess Anne Road, garbage has always been 
picked up by the side of the building where it is well 
protected. 

Recently I was informed that the garbage had to be 
put on the curb, across the parking lot on Princess Anne 
Road. Two weeks ago, before 1 received the message 
concerning the placement of the garbage, they did not 



pick it up, although it was only two feet away. I was 
then told to put it |?ack by my buildiog. I then called and 
they did return to pick up the garbage. ^ 

I do feel this was quite an inconvience, and also I m 
concerned for these garbagenaen's safety at having to, 
stop on such a busy road, as they have two exits from, 
the parking lot beside where they are stopping 

MadeUne Cecil 

Virginia Beach 



> 



\k 






•'7 



Good Lookin' Sun 



Editor: 

I would like to note how much improved The Virginia 
Beach Sun looks compared to how it looked years ago. 
It really makes readers feel that, Virginia Beach has its 
very own newspaper which looks as good as the dailies. 

Keep up the good work with the investigative news, 



and please continue to print the columns from the local 
librarians, agriculture agents and detectives. The efforts; 
are greatly appreciated. 

Beverly Smith, ] 
Virginia Beach 



Government For The People 



.13 
■7 



Editor: 
ueiwge Washington stated in his Farewell Address to 
the American people in 1796: "The basis of our 
political system is the right of the people to make and tc 
alter the Constitution of government. But the 
Constituti(Hi which at any time exists, until changed by 
an explicit and authentic act of the whde pe<^le, is 
sacred and obligatory upcm aU." 

Article V: Specifically states that in order to amend 
(change) the Ccmstituticm, three-fourths of the states 
must ratify the amendment. 
This Article has been vidated repeatedly. 
First Amendment: "Congress shall make no law 
respecting an establishment of religim. (The above 
simply means that (Hir Founding Fathers wanted no 
repetiti(»> of the State established, and State contrdled, 
Anglican Oiurch of England. Then.. .to make certain 
that there could be no misunderstanding of its 
meaning, the First Miendment continues) 
"OR prc^ibiting the free exercise thereof: 
But thats not all. The First Amendment goes on to 
say: 
"OR abridging the freedom of speech..." 
Tbiis, the ConstitutiOT has been violated by 
jphibiting the free exercixe thereof," and "abridg- 
iHhe iVeedoiQ of sp«yl^ " f^ .^J ^ IITl 'U 

*♦ TTicreafre tlrtf* wdrds *^ ChurchiiBhall be 
s^'^bated from the State, and the school fron the 
Chuli^" do appear in the Soviet Qmstitution. 

Temh Amendment: "The powers not delegated to 
the United States by the Constituticm, nbow pr(Aibited 
by it to the States, are reserved to the States 
respectively, or to the peq;}le. 

The Federal go mment's intrusion into the educa- 
tional system is in vidation of this Amendment. The 
operation of the schod system is, by the Constitution, 




the prerogative of the individual states. ^ 

Article IV: (1) Prdiibits the merger of two or more .^ 
states into larger political units, and (2) Guarantees to 
the states and the people a republican (elected) iona of 
government. 

Under Federal Regionalism, which was implemented^^ 
in 1969, our fifty states have been divided into ten' 
regiMis. These ten regions are staffed by appointees,..,^ 
Not by elected representatives of the people. 

Article I, Section 8: "Congress shall have the power ^ 
to coin money, and regulate the value thereof." ' ' 

When in fact.. .we have a l(X)-percent privately ', 
owned banking system creating our money. 

Article I, Section 10: "No state shall make anything 
but gdd and silver cdn a tender in payment of debts.'/ 

When in fact... states are forced to use irreddniaA)! 
paper as "tender for debt." ; , ^ 

Carl Sandburg wrote, "When a nation goes down ^^ 
a socwty perishes, one condition may always be f( 
- they ftM-got where they came from." 

Some seem to have forgotten that in Americaii 
Government was created by the pec9le...as servant 
the people; government has no powers, except tbrou 
the oMisentof the peopte; and government cannot gtri 
the pecQsl^ anything, except what it has talnii fri 



.~- grant ^««eB« fbrgl?'^ thaf ^^__ 
survive as a Umted ^tes of America, worthy cS tie 
sacrifices of those who have wrought for us a heritage 
irf freedan, <^portunity and abundance. We must npk 
become traitors to our forefiuhers, and trample thifc: 
hard-won freedcxns undi^rfoot. If we do, then they havej 
wrought, won, and died in vain. I 

PaulWilsonj 
Norfolk, Va. 



Sun 
Flower 



By Beach Eitenioa Atcal 
Doris Trail 




A Home Too Well Sealed 
Can Create Headaches 

Weatherizing your Virginia Beach home not only 
preserves heat and precious energy ddlars, it also 
retains the valuable mdsture in the air and prevents 
low humidity from creating indoor discomfort. 

Uncomfortably low humidity levels are a constant 
probtem in winter, with its cdd, dry air. Whife most 
people are comfotable with a relative humidity level 
r«igi9g from Mto SO percent, actual humidity levels 
indo(»'s may be coiisickrably lower than that in the 
winter. Poc^ insulated hones are especially prone to 
uncomfortably k>w humidity levels during tlM heaing 
season. 

In a loosely instructed home, air exdianges occur 
very quicUy. Ewry time an air exchange occurs, 
outdoor air with a low moisture content enters the 
iKMse. Therefore, tite Irause loses heat and mouture 
and gains cdd, dry air. 

A very low relive humidity can mai» skin feel 
rough and chan>ed, ^ out the nose and other muctu 
membranes, ami oiuse itching. Capets and dothi^ 
wiU be m«-e likely to cause prd)lems because d" static 



electridty. Low humidity can cause structural damage • 
to a home and its furnishings by shrinking wood andl 
loosening glued jdnts in furniture. 

Some studies have Indicated a connecticm between! 
low humidity and illnesses such as head cdds. 

Low humidity in the home also may cause a "chill" in . 
the air, although the thermostat is turned up to a 
comfortable tempo'ature. Dry air heated to 68<'F. will 
feel cokkr than moist air at the same temperature. This 
is because excessive evapori^an of moisture from the 
skin into the dry air causes the skin to feel 
uncomfortably codL. 

Homes with a high rate <tf air exchange may require 
the addition d four to eight gallons of nuiisture per day 
to the m. But aiUing that mdsture may be difficuh and 
expensive. For instance, pladng a pan d water over a 
radiator will add cnly pints of water to the air uid will 
nd make much of a difference in humidity in most 
homes. 

Humidifiers—electric appliances which put mdsture 
into the air—are available in various types, models and 
sizes to n»et differed Meds. But reducing mdsture 
loss from the home in the first place is the simplest and, 
in the long run, most economical sdution to the 
problem of low humidity. 

lYy caulking up vnnttows and sealing cracks. That 
shouU make a noticeable improvement in the humidity 
level i^xsrs. 

On the other hami, a very well-sealed home may have 
appanit problem-excessi^ humidity in the winter, 
which can also damage a tone. lUs Is especially 
cammsa in bdnes w^^ are nd ac^q^teiy ventilated. 

As insulating luMses becomes man common, some 
peofrfe may find ttemielves n^mg a ikhumidifier in 
winter, not a humidifier. AUoiHm fresh air to enter a 
house, by sUghdy openli^ a iHwtofw or running an 
exhaust fan. wiU ht^ remove emets humicttty. 



a 

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m 

d 



131 



, Vb^ria BcMh, Vs., 23392 



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WHUa IMewate Area 
T«wV«Mi-*12Jt 



AlCMe'AvMS 
OMYMr.*ll.M 

Tw*YcMS-*i';jt 



ifti<Kl4FBiilia»iB 



Letters Wdcome 

Tht Ykr^vkiMmat Sun w^omes and 

^ouU h« ^p^ dmM$ gp^td md in- 
c^dt th€ wr^r$ mam, ^Uf^ md 
phon0 numbm. Matt kttgn to Tht 
y^tMa BmA^m, JS$ South R^anont 
Road, n^^^^ VA,2$4$2, 



Virginia JBfe^h Sun, November 10, 1982 3 



CBN Strives For Satellite Supremacy 



By Mite'ddotting 
&U1 Staff Writer 

In the western part of the city, where Indian River 
Road Unks Virginia Beach and CHe$^ake, four large, 
white saucer-like objects are nestled within 347 acres of 
sprawling greenery. 

Pointed Heaven-ward, the four radar dishes transmit 
programming 24-hours a day from Virginia Beach's 
Christian Broadcasting Network, Inc., the largest syn- 
dicator of cable television in America. All 50 states 
rweive CBN programming, as do 20 foreign countries 
and 1 8 million families wof id>wide. 

"We hope to provide a viable alternative through 
good clean entcrtaiiiment to what wepercieve as the 
somewha* decadent appf^ch of the three networks," 
says CBN Vice President for Broadcasting Tim Rober- 
tson, the 27 year-old son of CBN's founder, Dr. M. G. 
"Pat" Robertson. "We want to show by example that 
there are moral and ethical solutions to everyday life 
situations." 

This is accomplish^, Robertson said, by providing 
viewers with a mix of inspirational and commercial 
programming. Such religiously oriented shows as "The 
700 Club," "Oral Roberts and You" and "The Old 
Time Gospel Hour with Jerry Falwell" are shown on 
CBN side by side with '^ Jack Benny," "Burns and 
AUen," "Dealth VaUey Days" and "I Spy." Ad- 
ditionally, game shows such as "Tic Tac Dough" and 
"Let's Make A Deal" are broadcast on CBN. 

Such jH-ogramming is selected to fit in with CBN's 
theme of being a total family entertainment source. 
"Television is open and available to everyone from nine 
to 90," said Robertson. "The 90 year-old has already 
figured out what he wants out of life, but the nine year- 
old hasn't. With all the things on television today, you 
wonder how much of it really sinks in after a time." 

Asking "Does art initate life> or does life imitate 
art," Robertson points out the following aspects of 
network T.V. which bother Wm: 

•> 

•"More than 50 percent of the people shown in bed 
are unmarried. Why can't the people in bed be married? 
What's wrong with loving you wife?'* 

•"Authority figuref are const^tty laughed at and 
made to be the butt end of jqkes.^' 

•"Christians are portrayed as religious fanatics. 'Lit- 
tle House on the Prairie' is the only show where 
Christian!! are made to be normal people. Most of the 
time they look like kooks." 

"In Hollywood," Robertson continued, "the writers 



and the people who make the programs do not represent 
the morals and the valtws of the avwage person in 
America. This is why you see such a high degree of un- 
necessary violence and extramarital sex. I don't think 
they are showing otough of what is good in life. 

"But, 1 don't think everything on the networks is 
bad," Robertson explained. "You've got to rememter, 
the same networks that give us titilating shows like 
"Dynasty," "Dallas," and "Gctacral Hospital" also 
give us fine family shows like "Little House," "Walt 
Disney," and "60 Minutes." 

Family programming on network T.V. is rare, accor- 
ding to Robertson. Therefore, CBN has dnnded to dO 
something about it. CBN Cable Network as dwiided to 
become number one. 

"We wwit to overtake the networks," said Rober- 
tson. En route to this decision, CBN has more than 
doubled its budget to the $4 mllKon mark, more than 
tripled its staff, added four regional affiliate offices, 
and signed A. C. Nielsen to count its viewers, a key to 
attracting bigger advertising dollars. Already the 
Virginia Beach outfit has lured an eviable stable of 
national advertisers, including Procter & Gamble, 
General Mills, General Foods, Nestle, and Richardson- 
Vicks. 

All of this is essential to fit in with the senior Rober- 
tson's grand plan for CBN: to spread the Christian 
gospel to the world through radio and television. Says 
Tim Robertson: "The overall goal of CBN is tp prepare 
the world for the return of Jesus Christ. The overall 
goal of the cable network is similar, yet different^ 
Basically, though, its goal is to aid the parent company 
in its goal and at the same time provide family enter- 
tainment." 

The son of the late U.S. Senator A. Willis Robertson 
of Virginia, Dr. Pat Robertson had been a hard- . 
drinking Marine combat corps officer and a successful 
New York businessman. But, at the age of 27, he came 
to the realization that something was lacking in his life. 
That something was Jesus Christ. 

He became an ordained Southern Baptist minister 
and with $70 and a desire to purchase a television 
station, he came to Tidewater in 1959. By 1961, Rober- 
tson's dream became reality. Operating out of a small 
VHF station in Portsmouth, WYAH, Robertson's, 
station, became the first in the country to broadcast - 
primarily religious programs . 

Since then, CBN has grown into a vast national and 
international broadcasting organization. Most financial 



needs for the network and its ministry are raised 
through contributions from viewers who can call in 
pledges 24 hours per day. Last year, CBN pulled in 
more than $65 million from its audience through 
telethons in the U.S. and Canada. 

Although it began 20 years ago with a single black 
and white camera, electrical buzzing, and collapsing 
stages, CBN today boasU $22 million worth of Star 
Wars-age technology and state-of-the-art equipment. 
CBN Center, housed within a Colonial Williamsburg - 
style structure, contiuns more than 160,000 square feet, 
including four studios, two of which measure 1 1 ,000 
feet each. The entire production operation at CBN is 
computer technolc^y -based with memory capacity. 
More than 800 people are employed there. Opened in 
1978, the facility was built at a cost of $34. 1 million. 

In addition to the tetevision operation, CBN also runs 
an institution of higher learning, CBN University. A 
graduate-level school, CBNU was formed in 1978 to be 
an institution of high intellectual standards with a trans- 
cending purpose of glorifying God. The School of 
Communications offers master's degrees in radio and 
television, communication studies, journalism, adver- 
tising and marketing, visual communication, drama and 
Bibical communications studies. CBNU's school of 
education opened two years ago. 

Locally, CBN can be seen on Cox Cable's channel 26. 
CBN is part of Cox's basic package which includes 
Cable News, ESPN, USA, and the three network af- 
filiates. WYAH-27 of Portsmouth is now a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of CBN, and makes up one-fourth of 
CBN's commercial network, along with stations in 
Boston, Dallas, and Atlanta. 

Oun fights, fistfights, cattle-rustling and lynchings 
are key ingredients in any good spaghetti western. Such 
programs are the staples of CBN's "Saturday at the 
Westerns," a marathon of movies which complement 
the network's other western fare such as "Wagon 
Train," "Wild Bill Hickok" Wyatt Earp," and "Judge 
Roy Bean." Such violence would seem to contradict 
CBN's basic philosophy of programming. Not so, says 
Tim Robertson. 

"The violence portrayed in the westerns is not 
gratuitous," he says. "The good guy always wins. 
Westerns are like little morality plays. While they are 
certainly not on the scope of Molliaire, they still get the 
point across that good should always triumph over 
evil." 

Employing such subtlety may be the key to the Rober- 
tsons' dream of one day unseating ABC. NBC, and 




A CBN radar dish frames the center's steeple . 

CBS. "We know that nobody in the world wants 
religious programming 24 hours a day," says Rober- 
tson. 

His father, in a recent issue of Religious Broad 
casting, agreai. Said Pat Robertson: "Not even the 
most devout Christian sits in a church 24 hours a day," 
Wholesome family entertainment "doesn't mean no 
violence, no drama. We're not going to have everybody 
speaking Old English and wearing wigs . 

"We like to think of ourselves as professional broad- 
casters," he continued. "We're trying to take television 
and glorify Jesus Christ. We want to show the relevency 
of Christ in our total life." 

Will CBN succeed? "Nobody knows for sure," says 
Tim Robertson. "Only time will tell." 




Coiumakt Williaa F. BiMjdcy 0) JirtM CBN fowMier Pat Robcrtton ra CBN'i "The TW Ouh." 



CBN boasts Star Wars-age, state of the art technology 




PUBLICNOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 

GREAT NECK ROAD 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

A Design Public Hearing will be held by 
representatives of the Virginia Department of 
Highways and Transportation on December 8, 
1982, at 7:00 p.m., in the Cox High School 
Auditorium located at 1848 North Great Neck 
Road in Virginia Beach, for the purpose of con- 
sidering the proposed design of Great Neck Road 
from 0.01 mile north of Shorehaven Drive to the 
intersecton of Shore Drive (Route 60), in the City 
of Virginia Beach. 

AU interested parties are urged to attend and 
give the Department the benefit of their comments 
and suggestions relative to the proposed highway 
improvement. 

Maps, drawings, a final environmental 
document, and other information are available for 
public review and copying in the Department of 
Highways and Transportation District Office 
located at 1700 North Main Street in Suffolk, in 
its Residency Office located at tte intersection of 
Business Route 13 (Military Highway) and Route 
168 in Chesapeake, and in the office of the Direc- 
tor of Public Works for the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

Representatives of the Department will be 
present at the Cox High School Auditorium from 
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the afternoon of the public 
hearing, for an informal review of available in- 
formation by Interested citiKns. All interested 
persons are encouraged to review the proposal 
prior to the formal hearing. 

Written statnnents and other »hibits relative to 
the propo^ iwoject may be prKcnt«i in ptace of, 
or in addition to, oral statements at the hearing. 
&ich written statements and exhibits may also be 
submitted to the Department at any time within 
ten days after the public hearing. 

At this d^ign public hearing, relocation 
assistance programs and tentative «;hedutes for 
right of way acquisition and construction will also 
be discussed. 

State Highway and Transportation 
Commi^ion of Virginia ^ 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTA 

Incorporated 



FIJI 



I Au 




Per Day I 

,€ntaJ!_ J 



I q'.OOPerDay j 
I Discount j 
1 With This Ad j 

5901 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Call 461-5550 



4 



"Rich^ are chiefly ^x)d beoiuse they give us time. ' ' 

Charles Lamb 



I 



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m^m 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 



Entertainment 




Scouts On Parade At The Pavilion, The Library 




SUHIines 

By Beach Ubrarian Carolyn Powell 




When sQouts and leaders from the Tidewater area 
gather at the Pavilion for the Nov. 13 Scout Show, their 
presehce will represent thousandsof hours of work and 
fun arid community service. The theme of this year's 
show, "footsteps of the founder: pathways to the 
fliture," celebrates the 75th anniversary of world 
scouting. 

Although the Tidewater Ctouncil as well as national 
scouting publicaticms offer comprehensive training and 
program aldis, the scout leader planning a meeting or 



Free Hospital Healthday 



Curtis Ethridge and Renee Redding as the beasts coming to greet Meg Murry 

Children's Book Week Celebrated In Dance, Story 



The Virginia Beach Unit 
of the Amertcan Cancer 
Society t and Virginia 
Beach > General Hospital 
will hold a free health day 
at the Sffltack Community 
Center at 141 South Bir- 
dneck Road on Saturday 
Nov. 13, from 8 a.m. till 
12 p.m. 

The following check- 



ups will be given: breast 
self-examination, pulmo- 
nary function, blood 
pressure, height and 
weight, diabetes and oral 
cancer examination. 
These tests will be given by 
volunteer professionals 
and non professionals of 
the Cancer unit and 
Virginia Beach General. 



activity, or the scout wOTkihg oh an achieyem|nt or 
merit badge, might turn to the library fa addiaonal 
help and informati(». 

The library's collection offers a range of Boy SoMt 
official publications including copies (rfthc merit badge 
requirement books, the "Official Boy Scout Hand- 
book." and manuals fw leaders. The cdllectipo is 
presently being updated and will offer ah in-depth 
selection of these materials. In addition, there are 
related materials such as "Norman RodkWeU's world of 
scouting" and William Hillcourt's biography of Robert 
Badon-Powell. 

A wide variety of craft boc*s will l^elp in the planning 
of den meetings ot in the completiai of merit badges, 
hidian dances can be learned by barrowins records 
from the Windsw Woods Branch library. CXhcr 
materials are available which would be helpful in 
running meetings, managing pack ex trcmp finances, 
counseling boys, etc. 

The Virginia Beach Public library also offers 
programs which might supplement scout activities. 
Leaders and boys should check newspaper announce- 
ment or the library's calendar of events, "Update" to 
find out about programs being offered. In the past, the 
library has co-sponsored programs on baclq)^king and 
hiking with the Appalachian Trail Qub, as well as 
having offered a variety of first aid and home safety 
programs. Further infMrmation can be obtained by 
calling your closest branch lihrary. 

Enjoy the Scout Show, visit the library and be 
prepared. . 






1 



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.Free Medical Career Seminar 



The Virginia Beach Pu- 
blic Library will celebrate 
Children's Book Week, 
Nov. 15-21, in a perfor- 
mance of 'A Wrinkle in 
Time" by "The Moving 
Company-Dance Now", a 
professiraial modern da- 
nce company, on Sunday, 
Nov. 21 at 2:30 p.m. in the 
Great Neck Branch 
Library. 

"A Wrinkle in Time" is 
a novel for children and 
young people by Made- 

le ine L'Engle. L'Engle. 

,was awarded' The ,^8w^ 
berry Medal by the Amer- 
ican Association "fw the 
most distinguished contr- 
ibution to American Liter- 
ature for children." Her 
novel has been a child- 
ren's favorite for 23 years. 

Virginia Beach families 
are encouraged to jan 
together in sharing in this 
colorful and exciting port- 
rayal of "A Wrinkle in 
Time." Interested per- 
sons may reserve a seat in 
the performance by call- 
ing the library at 481- 
6094. "A Wrinkle in 
Time" is being sp(xisored 
by the Friends of the 



Virginia Beach Public Li- 
brary. 

Children's Week 

The theme of Child- 
ren's Book Week is "Get 
Lost in a Book", and "A 
Wrinkle in Time" is an 
other wordly place to st- 
art. The dance perform- 
ance will portray Meg 
Murry and her small bro- 
ther Charles Wallace as 
they meet three extracw- 
dinary and unearthly lad- 
ies, and with their help go 

space. They search far 
their father, a scientist 
who disappeared while on 
a dangerous government 
mission ccmcerning the 
Tesseract, which is "a 
wrinkle in time." The 
children meet all kinds of 
strange and wonderful 
creatures during their 
search through time and 
space. 

The music that acctanp- 
anies the perfOTmance- 
was ccwnposed by Virginia 
Beach educator Tom Rice. 

Tice's composition was 
funded by a grant from 
the Virginia Arts Comm- 



ission. The modern dance 
choreography was devised 
by Jennifer Tsigdinos and 
Vija Cunningham and was 
funded by a grant fron 
the Virginia Beach Arts 
and Humanities Commis- 
sion. The costumes for 
this unique producticm- 
were made by TTieoGiesy. 
"A Wrinkle in Time" is 
directed by Vija Cunnin- 
ham. 



"AWrinkleinTime"is 
playing Nov. 10 through 
Nov. 30 in a variety of 
locations in Tidewater. 
Persons interested in learn- 
ing more about the perfo- 
rmance at the Great Neck 
Branch Library may call 
481-6094. taiformation 
concerning other perfor- 
mances by The Dance 
Company may be obtain- 
ed by calling 499-2067. 



The Educational Op- 
portunity Cepter will 
sponsor a MeilTcai Careers 
Seminar on Tuesday, 
Nov. 16, at the Kempsville 
Recreation Center, Room 
117, from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Local professionals will 
be on hand to discuss a 



variety of career oppor- 
tunities in the health care 
field. The program is free 
and open to the public, 
but registration is 
necessary to ensure 
seating. To register, call 
the Educational Oppor- 
tunity Center at 463-48 Itt. 



GREENLEAF AUTO 

WE FINANCE 

NO CREDIT CHECK 

EASY TERMS 

545-1265 

1944 N. Battlefield Blvd., Chesapeake 




Free Twain Lectures At TCC 



Jack Nelson as Mark 
Twain will perform act 
two of "The Trouble 
Begins at Eight" on Thur- 
sday, Nov. 11, at 12:30 
p.m. and again at 8 p.m. 
in.B-100 at the Virginia 
Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community 
College. 

The one-man show 
recreates the public lec- 
tures of Samuel Clemens, 
more popularly known as 
Mark Twain. In act two, 
Nelson portrays Twain in 
his later years as the most 
renowned author in the 
land. 

A native of Virginia, 
Nelson began his initial 
research into the character 
of Mark Twain more than 



This Week's 

Secret Personality 

Is Jon St. John 



seven years ago. His per- 
formances of Twain's lec- 
tures have taken place 
both in the United States 
and abroad. 

The performances are 
free and open to the 
public. For more infor- 
mation, contact TCC's 
Student Activities Office, 
427-3070, ext. 139. 



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cuts? 

Have unwanted ^^ 

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any part of the face or body. And it's 
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Great Bridge and Chesapeake 

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This Week's Secret Personality Is Jon St. John 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attora^ 
At Law 

461-4121 

5 Kc^cr Executive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Va. 2^ 






t hrtf 



George Crawford^ Morning Team 



FC7 EVERYTHING YOG NEED TO KNOW. 



/> 




To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 

Every 
morning, 
Mon.Sat, 

, WGH-13 broadcasts a 
total of 1 1 up-to-minute 
traffic reports. One for you 
every 15 minutes, to and 
from work. Listen, and get to 
where you're going, on time. 

Our 
Accai-Weather 

Keeps You 

Ahead of 

^,, T^^ ; Mother N. 

yi^^MK'/ Every morning, 
Mon.-Sat WGH-13 broad- 
casts a total of 25 exclusive 
Accu-Weather reports. Rain or 
shine; listen and you will be 
sure to kr»w, before It 
happens. 





For Who, What, 
Where, When, Fast 

Every moming, 
Mon.-Sat, WGH-13 
broadcasts a total of 13 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

If you're driving abng, you will 
be singing along. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tapplr^ 
your toes. The 
musk: is the 
magic of \M3H-13. 





<. I 



urt lo liitflO Jior the Secret Perioimi 

v«y Friday! Mh orf^tfy 

"S^rgtPwtnnftt^'and WIF'^ 

THIS WEEK'S SECRCT Pl^NAtlTl 




JEntertalnment 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 5 



Free Oil Painting Lecture At Arts Center 



The Virginif Beach Arts 
Center ^ill offer a lecture 
on oil paiijiting, Thursday, 
Nov. I|,^7j30p.tnuand 
a worksHpp ,on jfriday, 
Nov., 12, from 9:3(^ a.m. 
to 3j30;|).m. ^tji ac' 
tivities, wW be ,^ld at the 
Arts Center located fit 
1711 Arctic Avenue. 

Both, the lectui-e and 
workshdp;' will feature a 
renown VirginSa painter, 
Ann Glover of Roanoke. 
GloVfcr Will give a slide 
presentation Friday 
evening that will chronicle 
the devf lopmeDt of the ar- 
tist as a paintfr. Sources 
of inspiratiQQ. ao^ pther 
influences on the artist's 
career de\felopnient and 
painting s.tyie will be 
discussed. Also, an em- 
phasis will be on ex- 
perimentation with color 
in the oil paint medium. 

The workshop will be 
an introduction to oil 
painting techniques used 
by the artist in painting 
sti| "life compositions. 
Gl#ver Willi demonstrate 



the painting process which 
wil include: arrangement 
of colors on the palette, 
color mixing, preliminary 
drawing on primed board 
an^ painting techniques. 

Glover has studied and 
taught painting 

throughout Virginia and 
her work has been 
exhibited in numerous 
museums and galleries in 
Roanoke, Richmond and 
Northern Virginia. Her 
work is presently exh- 
ibited in the Virginia 
Museum Artmobile and 
the Institute of Contem- 
porary Art at the Virginia 
Museum in Richmond. 

In 1981, Glover served 
as an instructor in paint- 
ing at the Roanoke 
Museum of Fine Arts and 
was a guest lecturer with 
the Roanoke City Schools 
and HoUins College. 

"This is a fine oppor- 
tunity for artists to 
develop their skills in oil 
painting," said Frederick 
Schmid, Arts Center 
Director. "Ann is an ex- 



cellent artist herself and 
has the proven ability to 
communicate her 
knowledge to others." 
The lecture is open to 



while the work8h<n> has a 
cost of $24 for ArU Center 
members and $30 for non- 
members . Registration 
and information is 



the public at no charge available at 423-0000. 

Running Clinic Set 



The Virginia Beach 
YMCA will conduct a 
running clinic on Satur- 
day, Nov. 20, from 10 
a.m. to 12 noon. 

The clinic is open to 
beginners, men and women 
interested in lifelong run- 
ning and fitness. Proper 
running fundamentals and 



techniques will be 
discussed. Incltided will be 
topics on diet, shoe selec- 
tion and injury preven- 
tion. For registration and 
additional information 
about the running clinic or 
other YMCA programs, 
contact the Virginia Beach 
YMCA at 499-23 11. 



How To Cook Ham, Turkey 

The Virginia Beach Department of 
Agriculture/Virginia Cooperative Extension Service is 
sponsoring tAe program "Holiday Specialties For Hams 
and Turkeys" on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at Kempsville 
Recreation Center from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Professional home economists will demonstrate 
preparation and selection of country hams, sugar cured 
hams, and fresh and frozen turkey with samples to 
taste. Preregistration is required. Call the Dqmrtment 
of Agriculture, home economics division, 427-4311. 
There is a $2 fee for the program. 



Student Creative Corner 



The foUowing woriu were submitted by Robert E. Edwards, principal, Wiiliams Intermediate SdMoi, 
S92 Newtown Road. 



mi 



-^ 



I Want I, 

- I wantto die in my own space. 
A cold and damp annoying place. 
A^pbnewhereonly Icaniive. 
Where no one can take and no one can give. 
Where No one can steal and no one can lie. 
A place where no one will hear me cry. 
I want to yell out my saddness and pain. 
Let it flow out and not come again. 
The thing that I dream will all come alive. 
The day wd the mment that I die. 



Industry 



1."^ 



i»j:«-.,Bf 



^ Ann Hamel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
mand Hamel. Ann is a student in Elisabeth Am- 
brosio's seventh grade Class. 

Love 

Love is red. 

It tastes lijke candy. 

And soiMs^ke birds singing. 

It smelU like roses. 

It looks like a heart. 

It makes me feel cheerful. . 

By Robyn Hackett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard H^kett. Robyn is a student in Elisabeth 
Ambrosio's seventh grade class. 

"What Makes Me Smile" 

There are a lot of things that make me smile. I 
will tell you about one. 

The one thing I smile about the most is when 
I'm with my friends. You can have boy-friends 
and girl-ffkpAbut you always have one special 
friend. Tliat friend ii your best friend. 

When I'm with my best friend I am happy so I 
smile. I am glad. 1 have a best friend because I 
always have someone to go to when I want 
something to do or when I'm down I need 
someone to lift me up. I also go to my friend for 



Industry is growing; 
The progress is showing. 
But compared to our competetor. 
Production has to get better. 
I say we had better get going. 

-By Antk<my Vasquez, son of Mary Aimc Oam- 

bao. Anthony is a student m Mr. Thomas Canott^s 
seventh grade class. 



Cinquain 



Izod 

Style, neat 
Fitted, worn, liked, 
Fashion, fad, class, expensive. 
Alligator. 

By Michelle Umali, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rafael Umali. Michelle is a student in Mr. Thomas 
Carroll's seventh grade class.' 



help. When my friend helps me that makes me 
smile because I know he's my best friend. Maybe 
that makes him feel good because he knows he can 
help someone. That may make him smile too. My 
best friend and I are usually happy and that mak« 
me smile. 



Now, when you add all of these reasons 
smiling together, it adds up to caring. 
Caring is another reason I smile. 



for 



By Jimmy Smith, son of Mrs. Shirley Smith. 
Jimmy is a student in Mr. Thomas Carroll's seven- 
th grade class. 



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SHOPPING CENTI3R 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. 

4^-1974 




A fall gallery at the Virginia Beach Arts Center 



Lecture Well Attended 

Printmaking Featured 
At Beach Arts Center 



Ken Daley, Art Depar- 
tment Chairman at ODU, 
recently gave a lecture on 
"Printmaking," at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter. Daley's lecture 
highlighted the "Signed 
and Numbered" print 
exhibit and sale now on 
view at the Arts Center 
Gallery at 1711 Arctic 
Avenue in Virginia Beach. 
Daley discussed 
techniques of printmaking 
and expaned on the iden- 
tification of the 
ULei^M^VOues as ivell 9^^^ 
f defining a limited edltidn ^ 
series, before a full 
gallery^ Daley attended 
the Yale School of Art and 
Architecture where he 
received hiis Master of 
Fine ARTS. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Color 
Print Society and the 



Philadelphia Print Club. 

Daley's own works have 
been exhibited throughout 
the country. At present, 
he has works on view in 
the New Jersey State 
Museum in Trenton, the 
Museum of Modern Art in 
New York, and the 
Chrysler Museum in Nor- 
folk. 

"We were delighted to 
have Ken lecture for us," 
said Frederick Schmid, 
Director of the Arts Cen- 
ter. "His knowledge and 

.$:3U3ecieace \fl._,Mip_a«"i"t- 
making field i»in^^able 

to not only artists, but to 

anyone interested in the 

various mediums." 

Gallery hours are daily 

from 10 to 5 p.m. Monday 

through Saturday. The 

Center is open to the 

public. 



Ken Daley addresses his audience 



Art To Benefit Center 

Emma Meehan packed her bags and moved to 
Virginia Beach 13 years ago to paint and to teach 
painting. 

Originally from Philadelphia, Meehan was 
living in Long Island, New York, when she got 
beach fever after a 1964 visit to the Boardwalk Art 
Show. Meehan 's paintings will be exhibited for 
the NovCTiber Municipal Art Center Show in the 
s«;ond floor corridor of the City Administration 
Building on Courthouse Drive. 

"My husband and I liked the area so much 
, when we came for the Boardwalk Show," said 
Meehan, "that we decided it was a good area for 
nae to develop my painting and teaching. Dick has 
always been very supportive of my work, without 
him, I would not be able to paint. ' ' 

Tlte November show will exhibit 15 of Meehan's 
paintings in the corridor outside the City 
Manager's Office. She utilizes the acrylic-in-oil 
technique, a process that allows flexibility of ap- 
plication of the medium to the canvas by making 
the paint thicker. 

"All artists don't paint the same way. I was an 
oil painter until I found that 1 had developed an 
allergy to the turpentine. Now I work with 
Krylics. Oils, of course, are easier to work with, 
iKrylics dry^oo fast." 

With Meehan, it is her subject matter, more 
than her medium, that makes her work popular. 
She paints faces, clowns in particular, with bright- 
cdored c<»tumes. She paints floral still lifes, birds 
and scenes of snow-covere dseashores. Her work 
has been called traditional, realistic. 

"I often work from color slides and black and 
white photographs that Dick takes," said 



Meehan, "but I find that it's best sometimes just 
to work from memory, then, the little details that 
sometimes clutter a painting are forgotten." 

Meehan's painting, "Villa Victor Swan," is in- 
cluded in the November exhibit. The subject mat- 
ter represents a restaurant in Long Island she and 
her husband Dick, had frequented. Swans were 
nesting in a lake. Dick, took photographs and 
Emma painted. She paints at least two hours a 
day, sometimes as many as six. 

"Many teachers don't want the bother of 
teaching painting to beginners," said Meehan, 
"but someone helped me start. It wasn't kept a 
secret. I teach the students the techniques of ap- 
plying the medium to the canvas, and mixing 
colors. Believe me, you're not painting a house 
when you work with these mediums, you have to 
know the basics. So many painters, good pain- 
ters, are unwilling to teach this. I love it." 

Meehan, who has won awards for her own 
work, including a 1964 "Best in Show" at the 
Long Island State Park Commission Exhibit, has 
been criticized for painting too realistically. 

"All artists don't paint the same way, they 
shouldn't. I began to paint about 20 years ago 
when abstract was the thing," said Meehan. "All 
show judges wanted to label my work as 
traditional art. My feelings are that art should be 
something that you look at and it's pretty. There 
are no catagories aside ft-om those that involve 
personal taste and preference." 

Meehan's work will be framed and available for 
sale at the Municipal Center at a price range of $60 
to $150 for original art. A percentage of the 
proceeds from sales will benefit the Virginia Beach 
Arts Center. Additional information is available 
at 425-0000. 



ArtSaturdays For Kids Is Now Underway 



An Saturdays, a five- 
month series of weekend 
art worksh(^ for children 



t^weeh the ages of seven 
to 10 ^Ts, has begun at 
the Virginia Beach Arts 



DR. ROBERT THOMAS 
AND 
DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMR 

OPTOMETRISTS 

Specializing in Family Vision Analysis, 

Contact Lens, Extended Wear Soft Lens 

& Children's Vision 

Cireal Bridge Shopping C enter 

482-4022 



Center at 
Avenue. 

The program is design- 
ed to encourage youngs- 
ters to appreciate the 
visual and artistic techni- 
ques utilized in illustrat- 
ing selected children's 
bocks. Students will be 
able to experiment in the 
various mediums includ- 
ing waterc(4a', drawing, 
acrylic, cut paper and 
pen and ink. 

IiKluded in the Novem- 
t>er session wiU be a 
Pinhole photography 



1711 Arctic workshop Nov. 13), a 
rhythm and painting 
wwkshc^ (Nov. 20) and a 
mime wOTlahqp(Nov. 27). 



Children may register 
iat one or more of the five 
sessKMib at a cost erf S 16 
per sessicn for Arts Cen- 
ter members and $21 for 
n«i-members. Registra- 
tion and prc^ram informa- 
tk» is available at 42S- 
0000. 

"Suffer fools gladly. They 
may be right." 

Holbtt)ok JackMn 



i 




— i^.^—^ --?--<»**«»■ 



aaaa^MMH^asi 



"•IPW^W^W" 



^ ^ ■ -V^Vm^^V-A-Al.- H ^ iHW-i»^^'«^^'<*WV « ■ ■ 



^^^■•■P" 



-^■"■s^r^p^Pi 



ll«IP^«1P«4P|PVWi 



■PIMP 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10. 1982 



The Woman's View 



The Chopping Block 



Pecan Pleasure 

Flavorful pecans make for healthy between- 
meal snacking. Even though they have fat con- 
tent, it's unsaturated fat— the kind your body 
needs. And because they're pre-packaged in their 
own shells, they're ideal as a take-along snack. 
You'll never have to worry about a spoiled treat 
the way you might with soft-skinned fruits «i4 
vegetables. 

Pecans are a good source of protein and impor* 
tant vitamins and minerals, including iron, 
calcium and the B vitamins. They're rich in 
potassium and phosporus. two minerals often 
required for special dietary needs. And they 
provide the fiber that's important to diets. 
PLAIN TO SPECIAL 

With little trouble pecans can be added to a^ 
multitude of dishes, appetizers and snacks. They 
always add a fancy touch, not to mention rich 
flavor. Only a handful or so added to most 
recipes will do the trick. 

Although pecans have been traditionally 
popular in pies, cakes, other sweet baked goods 
and desserts, they're equally delicious in 
casseroles, salads, sandwich fillings and 
vegetables. 

HOW TO SiXECT PECANS 

To select nuts in the shell which are of the 
hipbest qiial'"!\ choose those fhat «re-<:lean and 
free of splits, cracks, stains or holes. There is no 
correlaiion between the quality of a nut and its 
size. When selecting shelled pecans, look for 
plump nutmeats which are fairly uniform in color 
and size. The best ones have a golden brown 
color. 

You may purchas halves for garnishes, Mit 
pecan pieces will suit most of your needs. They 
usually cost less and will save you chopping time. 

HOW TO STORE PECANS ^ j^ / 
Pecans are long lasting and. when stored 

properly, hold their freshness up to two years. 

This means pecans may be purchased in quantity 

when prices are most reasonable and qijoyed all 

year through 

You can store unshelled pecans in a cool, dry 

place for about six months. Unshelled pecans 

resist insects and aging much longer than shelled 

nuts; however, shelling before storage reduces 

their bulk by approximately one-half. 

Shelled or unshelled pecans mav be^j^qtujnder 
"reTfigeration irfairtigtt'cdiilafnefs' '^al^dijrnjne 

months, or stored in the freezer for up Co two 

years. 




Nutty 
Holiday 
Recipes 



CREAMY CHEESE SPREAD 

Soften 1 (3 oz.) package of cream cheese and mix 
in 2 tablespoons mayonnaise, 1 tablespoon minced 
onion, 2 tablespoons chopped pecans, '/i teaspoon 
salt, dash Qf pepper. 

OLIVE-CHEESE ROLLS 

Roll stuffed olives in softened cream cheese, then 
in chopped pecans. 

ROASTED PARTY PECANS 

Toss 1 cup unsalted pecan halves in 1 tablespoon 
olive or salad oil mixed with 1 tablespoon Wor- 
chestershire sauce. Roast in shallow baking pan in 
slow over (275 F) for 30 minutes, stirring often. 
Drain on paper towel; sprinkle with salt. 

For a less spicy taste, place 1 pound of pecan 
halves in baking pan with Vi stick of butter or 
margarine. Bake at 225 F for 30 to 45 minutes. 
Stir frequently. Spread on wax paper and salt to 
taste. J, ,=,. -J , , 

HOT, SPICED PECANS 

Melt a stick butter or margarine in skillet. Add 2 
cups whole pecan halves. Cook 20 minutes on low 
heat. Stir occasionally. Drain on paper towels. 

Mix in paper bag... 

1 '/2 cup confectioners sugar 

1 tablespoon cloves , j 

1 tablespoon cinnamon , . «.i| 

1 tablespoon nutmeg 
Add warm nuts to mixture in bag and shake well 
to coat. Buttered pecans, which are prepared by . 
omittinjg the seasonings in the above recipe, are 
delicious when served as a garnish on all kinds of ' 
desserts. /* 



Rich And Easy Pecan Pie 



J cup corn syrup 
1 teaspoon vanilla 



3 eggs 
Vi teaspoon salt 
I cup brown sugar 




1 cup chopped pecans 
1 tablespoon butter 



Beat eggs and sugar until thick. Add corn 
syrup, pecans, vanilla, butter and salt. 
Pour into unbaked 9-inch pastry shell. 



Bake 1 hour at 350 F. Cool. Top with 
whipped cream and garnish with pecan 
halves. 





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Enjoying Your Own Company 



Sdiiu people believe thev can't enjoy a dinner out 
alone. Or they may believe that shopping is best when 
it's a group activity. They may cringe at the idea of 
going to the show without a friend. 

How quickly they forget that it can be a nuisance to 
do everything ensemble. True, dinner cam be a social 
event, a time to spend money and enjoy conversation 
with annthc . But dinner can tnilv he savored alone. 

When you don't get immersed in philosophy or gosnp, 
you can leli.' h the flavor of each di!>h served. Face it, 
eating is an independent activity you can delight in with 
or without a}mpany. 

Shopping with someone can be fun— until your com- 



Holiday Depression: 
How To Beat It 



Holidays can bring on acute and unexpected 
depression to persons living alone. Even those happily 
adjusted to their solitary lifestyle may And the holidays 
difHcult to endure. 

Indeed, it is a time of sharing and giving, and these . 
acts always involve more than one per son . 

There are ways to avoid a potentially sorrowful time. 

First of all, check to see if some of your single friends 
are in the same situation. Perhaps you could band 
together to celebrate in festive fashion. 

In the spirit of giving and sharing, consider doing 
something nice for someone you don't even know. A 
homemade holiday pastry would be a thoughtful 
present for a lonely nursing home resident. The gesture 
may be more appreciated than you'll ever know. 

Also, you might consider inviting a small group of 
mentally retarded youngsters over for dinner. They 
may not have their own families to spend the holidays 
with. 

The most selfless gift to give is a part of yourself. If, 
however, it still doesn't help relieve ytni of holiday 
depression, hang in there. The season passes quickly. 

This&That 

Well-Rounded Shop 
Offers Unusual Gifts 

'Hiis & That Gifts is a place that makes your shopping 

a little less hectic and a little more fun. 

, , They jMJtjonlyiww the usu^ as^prlm^ nl of ^ntKiues, 

.antique reproductions, 9ollectibtes and ci'aTts but a large 

selection of childrens' toys, soft sculptures and wall 

hangings, as well. 

Additionally, special orders for childrens' dresses, 
play clothes and baby items are available as are limited 
edition childrens' paintings by Ferente. 

This & That is also an authorized dealer for 
Chillmark/Hudson registered limited edition pewter 
works. 

Rounding out this lovely shop is a large selection of 
wicker, handmao furniture and antique or contem- 
porary crystal. 

Finally, they are qualified to examine and give written 
appraisals on most antiques. 

So, if you're looking for unusual, unique and affor- 
dable gifts. This & That may be worth a look. 



Corner Cottage 

prnents 



NOV. 
14 



From 12 noon 'til 6 pm 

FREE 

Refreshments 

and 

Drawing for a Gift 

Certificate and Christmas 

Arrangements 




I nrru 



Comer Cottage 
6070 Indian River Rd. 
Va Beach. VA 
42»>«565 




BALL0C»6»GIFTS»PLANTS 

"Somethmg ^mMForSwneoneSpeM*' 

CALLUS: 463-2638 

WFl n IM HI'S 3333 Wnam Antic Ptas 
Store tn Virginia B«ch, Va. 23432 



panion wished to linger longer in one store ivtule-you 
desire to be in another. A shopping venture alone is 
much more practical and can be more enjoyable, for 
you can satisfy your own needs without worrying about 
inconveniencing someone else. 

Likewise, f^n^ need not know the fw^on sittine next 
to him to enjoy what's on the screen in a theater. Going 
to the moviTTs ia at irally an individual ui;dertaking, for 
yoii rely on your own senses and mind to follow the ac- 
tion and plot of a movie. 

Indeed, if you coQstantly consult a companion for in- 
formation during the show, chances are you would be 
reprimanded with a sharp "shhhl" by an irritated per- 
son within earshot. 

Less extravagant treats can be enjoyed in more 
familiar environs. 

The next time you watch an old-time movie on the 
tube, pop yourself some popcorn and fix yourself a nice' 
cup of hot chocolate. Go all out one evening and 
prepare yourself a gourmet feast. Or buy yourself a 
bouquet of fresh-cut flowers to liven up your home. 

You deserve it. 



•Gifts 



•Furniture 



Crystal 




•Wicker 

•Antiques 
And Collectibles 

THIS & THAT 




525 North Birdneck Rd. 
(Birdneck Shopping Center) 

Va. Beach 

422-3225 



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styles 




495-4275 



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Kempsvllle Road SMtion 



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■ ^ ■ 



Virginia Beach Sun, NovemberlO, 1982 7 



/>»» 



The Woman's View 



Notes To My Friends ... 



This old passion of 
mine for looking back at 
times past could 
■^ probably be better served 
^_ in museum, but I prefer 
" Elam. It's more per- 
^^Sonal. 

When I contemplate a 

^two-hundred-year old 

^ log wall i can imagine 

^' the generations of people 

who did the same. I 

believe, and have good 

''^ reason to, that they had 

"^"^ vegetables in the garden 

■^ and dogs in the yard, and 

carried wood in to this 

'- same fireplace in winter, 

and savored the sweet 

^ water from this same 

^ well in summer. 

^ And I believe they 




spent some time as I do, 
looking back and 
Looking Ahead. 



Last night I regaled that hardy lot df viewers who stay 
up late with the tale of my weekend, and my attempts to 
stay on the upwind side of my dog who had a close en- 
counter of the worst kind with a skunk. 

Today, no less than a dozen viewers have called in to 
pass the word that the only way to cure a dog of this 
malady is with generous quantities of tomato juice. 

I already knew about the rumor, but the only tomato 
juice I had on hand had already been mixed with vodka 
and adorned with a twist of lime. 

But I decided, what the heck, it might still work . 
t The dog drank half and I drank the othef half. 
The dog still smelled to high heavens, but neither of 
t minded as much. 

Our Mistake! 

In last week's article "Artisans Display Work At 
Renaissance Center," we incorrectly print^ the hours 
of operation. The Ghent Emporium is open on Mon., 
Tues., Wed., and Sat. from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and 
Thurs. and Fri. from 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. 



You don Y have to be a Genius 
to cook like one 



4 




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3 different commands in a row 

•Program Recall feature reminds you 

which cooking programs and times you've 

set 

LIMITED SUPPLY AT 

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Phone 340-5104 
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Remodeling Can Enlarge And Enlighten 




Hard to believe the ori^aal UviiKI riNMii-littk more than a cramped "box, "--is 
now the spacious, sunny ptacc pictured at left. Nothing enlarges a room quite 
like increased window span ami tN effect is cheerful as well. 



Pictured at right is an interesting re-do of an ordinary tract house into a dream 
hone which involved turning a small separate kitchen, dining room and living 
room into an attractive "Great Room" combining all three functions (and 
then some). Co-op rooms like this one are both fashionable and practical. 




"Basic Components For Home Theatre'* 

Consumers Want Quality In Home Entertainment 



Chicago, 111. -Home may well be where the heart is, 
but it's fast becoming the place where a family's total 
entertainment takes place. People spend much more 
time in front of a screen at home today—notes con- 
sumers digest-and not just to watch TV. Computer 
games and serious programming, subscription and cable 
television, video recordings of feature films and even 
home movies, are just a few reasons why people are 
demanding equipment that's more than just "alright." . 

A system comprised of various electronic components 



designed to provide high quality viewing and listening, 
the home theater is gaining popularity fast. New 
equipment (hardware) formerly only available to the 
professional is now being offered for sale to the con- 
sumer at competitive prices. And as When stereo 
equipment became the rule rather than the exception, 
consumers digest has discovered that people are assem- 
bling their own home theaters because they want 
quality. 

But the endless array of components available baffles 
shoppers. "Basic Components For A Home Theater" 



Local Store Offers Double Protection 



For ttw best in appttsm- 
ces, buy them from a store 
that carries well-known 
makes and services 
everything they sell, a 
locally-owned and 
operated store such as 
London Bridge Applian- 
ces, Inc. Located at 348 
London Bridge Center (at 
the corner of Great Neck 
Rd. and Virginia Beach 
Blvd.), phone 340-5104, 
here you will receive 
double protection on their 



reHaWt -^TJervtefe'ftniqy,! 
plus the Avarrdnty of such 
nationally-known , ap- 
pliance manufacturers as 
Whirlpool, Jenn-air, Kit- 
chen-aid and Frigidaire, as 
well as Panasonic in 
microwaves. 

You have to see for 
yourself the beauty and 
efflciency of these out- 
standing appliances that 
do better work more easily 
and add a note of beauty 



and cheer lo ttie liomc . ■ 

As your factory- 
authorized sales, service 
and parts dealer for 
nationally-known brands, 
London BridRC, Applian- 



ces* Inc., a locaHy-owned 
and operated business 
giving you the added ad- 
vantage of personalized 
service and nationally- 
known manufacturers. 



by Norman Eisenberg~in the September/October issue 
of Consumers Digest --helps dispel confusion about how 
to buy. Not only does the magazine outline state-of-the- 
art components from leading manufacturers, but it 
parlays that comprehensive data into a guide, showing 
consumers— on all kinds of budgets-how to select 
equipment th»t interfaces with what's already at home. 

Sony (Profeel) and Nad/Proton are cited by Con- 
sumers Digest as creators of superior video monitors, 
which come as large as 25" (diagonally). The magazine 
also names Jensen AVS-1500 as an excellent tuner /con- 
trol component. In VCR's CD calls it a toss-up between 
the Beta and VHS systems; and in laser discs, 
Pioneer/Magnavox is recommended. 

To start a home theater from scratch, the Consumers 



L 



Have A Decorating Idea? 

Send it to: Th« Wouim's Vl«w 

P.O. Box 1327 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



Corner Cottage—Life Long Ambition Realized 



According to Mrs. Kathy Of field, owner of the Con- 
ner Cottage in Virginia Beach, "My lifelong ambition 
was realized when we opened this fascinating little 
shop." Kathy, who comes from a large family (one of 
eleven children), opened the business on the sixth of 
January, 1982. Mrs. Offleld was born in Kempsville and 
attended Kempsville High School, but lives in the Den- 
beigh area at present. She stated, "we are looking for a 
home here in Virginia Beach to be near our business and 
many friends in the area." 

"This is truly a family and friend business Mrs. Of- 
fleld stated. "My husband comes in after work and 
maintains the books and my mother, who is 84, loves to 
come by just to talk with our friends." 

Having distinct colonial flare inside, this fascinating 
shop truly offers something for everyone. Baldwin 
Brass, to light your Thanksgiving table, table settings 
and place mats for that special holiday touch, florals in 



silk for every decor, and the Corner Cottage specializes 
in weddings. "My most proud possession is our wed- 
ding florals, church floral arrangements and special 
touch gifts, but, 1 have to say the kitchen is the warmest 
room of all," said Mrs. Offield. 

Everything from linen towels to cookie cutters of 
every imaginable shape, and even a chopping block for 
your Christmas bird. Music boxes, Norman Rockwell or 
a Roman nativity scene fill the table tops, and, a most 
unique touch, a babies for adoption section (the dolls), 
the Babyland General. They have the prized Xavier 
Roberts signature and adoption papers, folks! 

You can make your holidays warm and special with 
Clare Burke fragrance or one of a large selection of 
scented candles. 

Drop by and visit Kathy and her room, her friend, Carol 
Lee Foster, niece, Patsy Kidd and sister Marie Tuttle. 
You'll probably meet some of your own friends there too. 



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trol unit, video cassette recorder, video disc player, and 
speakers. A total home theater can be purchased for 
two thousand dollars and up, depending on individual 
budget and taste. 

It's also possible to start a system with lower upfront 
cash outlays, and consumers digest maps out the 
possibilities. You can purchase a VCR and video 
monitor and interfaced that with your television. 
Result: beautiful TV pictures on the monitor. Or, if you 
already own a TV that offers satisfactory clarity, you 
can integrate that with audio equipment that will 
provide AM/stereo FM controls and amplification. 

The simplest configuration is to use your TV and 
stereo equipment and add a TV audio tuner that connec- 
ts to the TV antenna and provides separate TV sound. 
That can be accomplished for as little as $30! 

Consumers Digest suggests that the smart shopper 
should plot out goals for his or her home theater before 
making purchases. Is sound a major priority? If a 
screen is needed, how large is the room, and how many 
people will be watching? Consumers are encouraged to 
read up on descriptions of the latest equipment, and 
company histmies, and to compare retail prices. 

For the conv enience of your audience, Consumers 
Digest offers the following home theater component 
prices. Permission is grated to reprint or broadcast any 
of this data, as long as the source is attributed. 



Announcements 

Ocean Park Women Meet 

The OFWC Ocean Park Woman's Club will hold its 
monthly meeting on Wednesday. Nov. 10. at 11 a.m. m 
the clubroom at the Fire Station. Colonel Craig 
Barkley. NASA, will speak on International Affairs. 

A luncheon wiU be served with Mrs. R. E. Brickhouse 
and Mrs. F. G. Summs, Jr., in charge. 

Christmas Fair At Friend 's School 

The Virginia Beach Friends School will sponsor its 
third annual Christmas book and gift fair beginning 
Tuesday, Nov. 30 and continuing ihrough Saturday, 
Dec. 4. 

The School is located at 1537 Laskin Road. For more 
information call 428-7534. 

Beach General Expands 



Vice I^sident and Ad- 
ministrator W. Earl Willis 
has annouiK:ed that Vir- 
ginia Beach General Hos- 
[Mtal received a certificate 
of public need to expand 
and renovate its obstetri- 
oU, labor/delivery, nur- 
sery, and post-partum 
areas. 

Upon completion c^ the 
project tl«re will be 7 
Ciwibinatton lab(H^-deli- 
very-rewwery rooms, 2 

The total amount of 
square feet to be construc- 
ted or renovated is 33,753. 



high-risk labor rooms, 2 
delivery (C-section) and 1 
recovery rooms, 36 obste- 
trical beds, and 46 bassi- 
nets. Total capital expen- 
diture involved is 
$3,395,100. It is anticiiM'- 
ted that cotstruction wiU 
begin in April 1^3, with 
rampletion in tte fiall of 
1984. 

The hosi^at will amvert 
12 existing semi-private 
midical/surgical rooms to 
private rooms at the com- 
pletion of the project. Tte 
loial Ucensed bette at the 
hospital would thereby re- 
main at 263. 



pmm 



«««9 



iV^iPP 



iwp^iyiWMiivnvpiPPPP 



mmmm^mmm 



City Council/School Beard 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 



'You Don't Fix Something Unless It's Broken': Pickett 



( untinucd from Pane I 
finance." • 

None of the other Virgii id Beav..! 
representatives contacted were op- 
timistic that a bill to alter the current 
school board structure would pass in 
the 1983 short session. "I'm just not 
sure of the idea at all," said Del. Owen 
B. Pickett of the 81st District. "The 
fundamental question is this: would we 
improve the system? 1 don't see that it 
would help." 

Would Pickett support any 
legislation along these lines? "Not 
unless somebody shows me facts which 
would show that change would im- 
prove the quality of education," he 
said. "You don't fix something unless 
it is broken, and the quality of Virginia 
Beach's school system speaks well for 
the current system." 

Del. W. R. "Buster" O'Brien of the 
82nd District agreed. "The whole idea 
concerns me," he said. "I am not 
aware of any study or scholarly treatise 
which shows that direct election of 
school board members makes for bet- 
ter school systems. 



"Besides," continued O'Brien, "I 
don't want to create another taxing 
body if I don't have to." 

Some members of City Council, 
however, feel that change is necessary. 
"The school board, as it is structured 
now, is isolated and out of touch," 
said Vice Mayor Barbara Henley. "For 
a long time, I did not favor the direct 
election of school board members 
because of the great expense involved 
in elections. The thing that changed my 
mind was the last budget process we 
went through. I'll tell you, that was 
one of the worst experiences in the 
history of Virginia Beach." 

Ideologically, a change in the current 
system would be for the better, 
Heneley said. "Right now. Council is 
in charge of raising funds, but has no 
power how it is spent. Also, if the 
board were more responsible to the 
people it would make for a better 
relationship all around." 

"We have to let the people in 
Virginia Beach have the option of elec- 
ting their school board," said at-Iarge 
member Meyera Oberndorf. "The 



Beach is a mosaic of people who have 
lived all over the country. Most of the 
states have direct election, so those 
people cannot understand the City 
Council has no power to direct the 
board." 

Direct election for direct election's 
sake would not be sufficient, Ober- 
ndorf cautioned. "Without the power 
of taxation going hand in hand with 
direct election, a school board would 
be impotent," she said. 

Allowing for direct elections of 
school boards would make life simpler 
for City Council, according to Kemps- 
ville Councilman J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
"Whenever it comes time to figure out 
the budget for the School Board, we on 
Council begin to feel the heat," he 
said. "If you were to give the board the 
power of taxation, it would most cer- 
tainly take the heat off Council. ' ' 

The problem, McCoy said, is that 
the School Board would become 
another political forum. "You would 
probably end up with all the leftover 
council candidates and crusading 
mothers running for the school 



board," he said. 

At l^ist one member of City Council 
opposes change. "There are lots of 
arguments on both sides, but I'd rather 
continue to have the School Board 
decided by appcnnttnent," said at-large 
Councibnan Roben G. "Bob" Jones. 
"We ought not to politicize school 
operations." 

McClanan calls that argument "a 
package of nonsense." Said Mc- 
Clanan: "I'm elected. Congressman 
Bill Whitehurst is elected. We are all 
responsible for large sums of money. 
Hie point of electing somebody is to 
make him accountable to the people. 
Right now, the board is not accoun- 
table." 

McClanan said the reasons for swit- 
ching to a directly-elected school board 
are "obvious and straightforward. It is 
long overdue in Virginia," he said. "It 
will happen one day, no doubt some 
timeinthel980's." 

Oberndorf agreed. "Just because an 
idea is not accepted immediately is not 
important," she said. "If an idea is 
good, it may have an opportunity one 
day to become reality." 



Brickell, Waddell Honored 

Dr. E. E. Brickell. superintendent of schools, and Dr. 
Robert W. Waddell are redpienu of resolutions of ap- 
preciation for their servke from 1969 to 1982 on the 
Transportation Safety Commission. 

The resolutions was tuloiKed Monday afternoon by 
Virginia Beach City Council. 

Smith Nominated To Board 

Virginia Beach City Clerk Ruth H. Smith has been 
ncoilnated to serve on the Board of Directors for thret 
years of the International Institute of Municipal Clerks. 

City Council Monday afternoon took action ap- 
proving Smith's participation in the organization and 
on Its board. 

Employees Get Christmas 

Since Christmas falls on a Saturday this year. Virginia 
Beach city employees will have a day off on Christmas 
Eve. 

City Council Monday afternoon approved the 
holiday. 



City Council Wrestling With Legislation Proposals 



Continued from Page 1 
bust. Jennings pointed out 
that these funds are now 
placed in the State 
Literary Fund. "I wonder 
whether Virginia Beach is 
getting its fair share," he 
said. 

David Grochmal, 
assistant to the city 
manager said the 
legislative committee is 
drafting a bill addressing 
this concern along the 
lines of similar legislation 
in Florida. When the 
proposal is ready, it will 
be returned to Council for 
consideration. 

McClanan noted that 
the Literary Fund is 
available to all school 



divisions and this fall a 
Literary Fund loan is 
helping to finance one 
Virginia Beach school. 
The money in the fund is 
available for school con- 
struction at a low (three 
percent) rate of interest. 

After Council comes to 
some agreement on the 
proposals next week, it 
will meet with local 
legislators in a workshop 
to find our which of the 
proposals the legislators 
will support and the chan- 
ces any of them have of 
passage by the General 
Assembly. 

In the past, at these 
sessions, the State law 
makers have mostly 



New KulesFdf Stands 

Operators of roadside stands will be permitted to sell 
produce they have grown on sites other than where the 
stands are located under an ordinance approved by 
Virginia Beach City Council Monday afternoon. 

Current regulations require that the stands sell only 
produce grown on the same premises where the stand is 
located. 

The ordinance also requires that at least SO percent by 
value of the produce sold from the stand shall have been 
produced on the lot or parcel on which the stand is 
located. 

Some operators had requested they be allowed to pur- 
chase produce from other farmers to supplement their 
own products, but this consideration was not included 
in the new ordinance. 



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listened and the inter- 
change has been limited. 
Heischober said that in the 
two sessions he attended, 
there had been little 
dialogue. "Occasionally 
one would shake his 
head." He added, 
however, .that this year 
there will be a "whole dif- 
ferent ball game" because 
all of the representatives 
are Virginia Beach citizens.. 
That's not to say. he said, 
that the representatives 
from Chesapeake and 
Norfolk did not try to help 
Virginia Beach. 

Heischober said that 
Council should come to a 
consensus on what it wan- 



ted before meeting with 
legislators. 

Kitchin said he would 
want the legislators to get 
the impression that Coun- 
cil is saying, "This is it 
andif not, tough." 

The proposals discussed 
by Council most so far are 
one calling for legislation 
allowing localities to levy 
a general retail sales tax at 
two percent rather than 
one percent and another 
asking the General 
Assembly to study the ad- 
vantages and disadvan- 
tages of allowing localities 
the option of having elec- 
ted schools boards with 
the power of taxation. 

Jennings said that he 



would not vote for the 
sales tax until there was a 
corresponding rollback of 
other taxes imposed by the 
city. Jennings also said he 



had reservations about the 
request for $2 million in 
State funds for the con- 
struction of the Virginia 
SeeWISHUST,Page9 



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Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 9 



City's 
t)fficials 
Salute 
Art Show 

The City of 
Vir^nia Beach last 
week h(»ted a lunch- 
eon reception for the 
winners of its annual 
employee art con- 
test. TMs year's 
competitioin in- 
duced employees of 
the city's school sys- 
tem, as well. On 
hand for the oc- 
casslon were such 
city officials as 
M»yoT Louis Jones, 
City Manager 
Thomas Muehleff- 
beck, Council mem- 
bers Reba McQanan 
and Bob Jones, 
Police CUef Charles. 
Wall, Fire Cfiief 
Harry Diezel, Com- 
monwealth's Attor^* 
ney Paul Sciortino, 
Ecnomic Develop- 
ment Director James 
DeBellis, and school 
Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell. 

Some 48 ribbons 
were handed out to 
award winners. A 
complete list of 
those Winners wiV bt 
printed in next 
week's Virginia 
Beach Sun, 




BikkeU 0) Md Jom* (r) 
fSM MirHcecltM at dM V*. 
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Reactions 



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the 



Continued from Page 8 

Museum of Marine Scien- 
ces. His problems are with 
the city's share of $3.5 
million which would have 
to be raised by issuing 
charter bonds. He said the 
only way he would vote 
for that is to place a 



refer^ditni before 
peof^. 

Creech said that while 
the city w>u)d be uicing 
onfy for a study in the case 
of M^la^ed school boards, 
Coundt should have a bet- 
ter idea about which direc- 
tion it wanted to go before 
"opening Pandora's 
box." 

Heischober added that 



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there was a danger in the 
proposal because the 
General Assembly may 
impose legislation against 
the city's will. He said he 
would ask for the study 
only if it were clear that 
Council did not 
necessarily endorse the 
results. 

H«dey pointed out that 
the proposal stipulates 
local option. 

Concerning objections 
to increasing the sales tax, 
teum said that the city 



government is restricte^^ 
its sources of revenue. He 
said that recent Federal 
and State , cutbacks have 
meant that the local 
governments have to deal 
with the problems. 
Without more diversified 
taxes, he said, "we're 
boxing ourselves in." 

Mayor Jones said that 
the city needs to retain the 
option of flexibility. He 
said lie didn't want any of 
the flexibility to be taken 
away. 



Free Counseling Offered 



The Caty of Vinlnia 
Bm^ p»urt Serviw Unit 
offers marriage and 
faaiUy crisii co^teUng 
free of charge to couples, 
i«iUiu off«d«i and thdr 
families who re«de in 
Virginia BMch. AU in- 
f(»mation Is Mnfidential. 

The Unit lUtemirts to 
invdw the whole family 
in the counseling i»t>cess. 
TMt process helps the 
fKDEdly kam how to com- 
muninte to assist the en- 



tire family in dealing with 
their problem. 

The Court Service Unit 
is a pvt of the Juvenile 
and Domestic Relations 
Diftdtf CX)uit. tiM Unit 
is located at the Virgteia 
Beach Munidi^ Center. 
Hours are 9 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Monday through 
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. on Friday. 

For furthw information 
call 427-4194. 




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Mixed Reactions Abound 
Over Elections ^ Results 



Continued from Page 1 

the Virginia Beach votes. 
Davis managed to carry 
the joint Norfolk-Virginia 
Beach Second Con- 
gressional District 
through the strength of a 
13,000-vote margin in 
Norfolk. That margin did 
not prove to be enough for 
Davis, however, as Trible 
was victorious in Virginia 
Beach as well as in 
Newport News, Rich- 
mond, Southside, 
Roanoke, and the 
Shenandoah Valley. 
Davis carried the Por- 
tsmouth, Chesapeake, 
Suffolk area as well as 
Northern Virginia. In the 
«id, though, Trible gar- 
nered 51 percent of the 
state's votes; Davis, 49. 

Pickett led a 
Democratic sweep of the 
three contested House of 
Delegates races by 
defeating Del. Melvin M. 
Spence, a Republican, in 
the rurd and oceanfront 
81st District. Pickett, an 






*An opUmItt to a fellow who believe what's going to be 
wM to postponwi." Kin Hubbard 



11 year House veteran, 
captured 38 percent of the 
votes, ousting Spence, a 
first-year legislator. The 
two incumbents were for- 
ced to square off against 
each other when state re- 
districting placed them in 
the same district. They 
were the only incumbents 

in the state placed in such 
a predicament. 

Smith, a former 
Republican turned 
Democrat, defeated 
Republican F. Gordon 
Harper, Sr. in the 8Sth- 
I^trict by less than 200 
votes. Smith, who had 
lost two previous bids for 
the state House, tallied 
6,231 votes to Harper's 
6,062. For Harper, it was 
the third setback in as 
many political endeavors: 
he lost two earlier City 
Council elctions. Charles 
L. Bowman of the 
Citizen's Party netted 497 
votes in the district. 

Billy O'Brien, a nine- 
year Democratic incum- 



bent, snared nearly iS 
percent of the votes in the 
83rd District, defeating 
Republican challenger 
Daniel H. Templeton. 
The campaign was noted 
for angry exchanges bet- 
ween the two candidates 
as well as for Templeton's 
feuding with his own 
Republican party. 

More than 48,000 voters 
in Virginia Beach cast 
ballots for Congressman 
Whitehurst, despite the 
fact that he was unop- 
posed in his bid to attain 
his eighth two-year term. 
State-wide, the second 
district representative to 
the U.S. House of 
Representatives recieved 
78,229 votes. Although he 
says he feels "marvelous" 
about being re-elected, 
Whitehurst says he is con- 
fused by what the election 
day results really mean. 

"What is this election a 
mandate for," Whitehurst 
asked. "Shucks, it's hard 
to say. I'm disappointed 



that the local candiates did 
not do better, but at least 
they came close." 

The most bitter pill to 
swallow, according to 
Whitehurst, was the 1ms 
of Spence to Pickett in the 
81st. "I knew it would be 
a hard to defeat Owen," 
he said. "He is popular 
and he is a good man. I 
am not so partisan that I 
would not recognize when 
somebody is doing a good 
job. It is just a shame that 
Mel, an experienced 
legislator, had to lose." 

The fact that both 
Republicans and 

Democrats were victorious 
in Virginia Beach is good 
in the long run. said 
Whitehurst. "We have 
two strong parties, and 
this forces both of them to 
be on their toes," he said. 
"Voters will benefit from 
this in the long run 
because we will produce 
better candidates." 



In Regional Playoff s 



First Colonial To Represent Baich 



By WALTER LAUGHON 

The final participant in the regional playoffs 
was decided Friday night as Kempsville, of the 
Beach District, beat Norview, of the Eastern 
District, thus enabling Lake Taylor to toke the 
Eastern District Title. 

In Saturday's game. Lake Taylor played First 
Colonial, winner of the Beach District title, ending 
in a 24-24 tie. Hampton (9-0), of the Peninsula 
District, beat Bethel Friday to win the District 
Title and they will host Lake Taylor (6-2-2) Friday 
at Todd Field in Newport News. Norcom (10-0), 
of the Southeastern District will play host to First 
jqplpnial (9-0-1) Friday at Churchland in a battle 
of two undefeated teams. 

The NOrcom-inrst colonial match-up wm pit 
^be two top offensive teams in Tidewater against 
each other in what should be a real barn-burner. 
Lake Taylor will have the toughest chore of all 
when they travel to the I^ninsula to take on the 
Hampton Crabbers, defending state champions 
and winner of their last 33 games, the longest win- 
ning streak in the state. Hampton is considered 
the favorite, and Lake Taylor will have to play 
some of their best football of the season if they are 
to win this game. Hampton, a perennial football 
powerhouse, will not relinquish their State Cham- 
pionship easily and have been gearing-up to 
defend their State Championship all season. 

Both Norcom and First Colonial clinched their 
respective District Titles early in the season and 
have been waiting for the playoffs for a couple of 
weeks. First Colonial tied Eastwn District Cham- 
pion Lake Taylor Saturday night despite leading 
early in the game. AFter leading Lake Taylor 21-6 
in the first half, the Patriots went to sleep and 
Lake Taylor came back to score three touchdowns 
to lead 24-21 . First Colonial then managed a four- 
th period field goal to tie the score and with five 
seconds remaining in the game blocked a Lake 
Taylor field goal attempt, thus preserving the 
Patriots' undefeated status. Norcom, despite its 
undefeated and untied record, did struggle m its 
final three games, but that was due primarily to 
the fact that they had clinched the District Title 
and were looking ahead to the Regional Playoffs. 
Norcom and First Colonial have dominated the 



Coaches Poll for the majority of the season as well 
as being number one and two for most of the year 
in the VHSL ratings. 

Norcom and First Colonial led in all offensive 
categories this year, and both teams put a lot of 
points on the scoreboard all year. Furst Ccrionial is 
led by outstanding running back Will Forbes, who 
led Tidewater in rushing and scoring this year. 
Norcom is led by the number one pasang quarter- 
back in Tidewater, Ron Jones. The two teams are 
equal on offense but the edge in defense has to go 
to Norcom, who led their district in most defen- 
sive catagories for much of the year. 

However, in defense of First Colonial, it must 
be noted that they played more teams that were 
offense-minded than did N orcom. and perhaps 

weren't as impressive as those cdmpiled by the 
Greyhounds. Although the game will be played in 
Norcom 's home city of Portsmouth, it will be 
played on a newtral field. 

First Colonial has experience in playoffs and 
that could prove to be the margin they are looking 
for. The Patriots lost a very close decision to state 
champion Hampton after leading for most of the 
game in last years East Regional finals. Norcom 
has not been in a playoff since joining the 
Southeastern Conference and will be a little tight 
perhaps. This reporter's prediction is that First 
Colonial will win a very close game. 

Defending state champion, Hampton, not only 
has the eiperience but will be playing on their side 
of the river. Hampton has a crushing defense , 
one of the best in the state and their offense is 
more than adequate. Lake Taylor has one of the 
most potent offenses around and this game should 
be a classic example of "the immovable object and 
the irresistable force." Hampton's defense is the 
immovable object and the Lake Taylor offense is 
the irresistable force. This reporter feels that 
Hampton's experience and their ouUtanding 
defense will propel them to victory over Lake 
Taylor in this East Regional ptoyoff game. 

Playoff Picks 

First Colonial 21 -Norcom 14 
Hampton 1 7-Lake Taylor 6 



Forbes Named Sun's Player Of The Year 

J- 1 :_ _ti 



By Walter Laughon 
In Will Forbes' outstanding achievemente in the 1982 
football season. The Virginia Beach Sun has chosen him 
the outstanding player in Virginia Beach. PUying on a 
First Colonial team that went 9-0-1, Forbes was m- 
strumental in the Patriots first place finish in the Beach 
CMstrict and iU number one ranking for most of the 

season. ^. ... 

Will Forbes led the Distrcit m rushing for the entire 



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season and was the leading rusher in aU of Tidewater for 
the year with a total of 1 .390 yards. In addiUon to being 
the leading rusher, Forbes also had the highest average 
yards per carry (9.8) and was the leading scorer in the 
Tidewater area, scoring a total of 132 points. Forbes 
also returned kicks and i^yed outstanding defense m 
the secondary for First Colonial. He was one of the bet- 
ter defensive backs in the District but was used sparingly 
l^ coach Frank Webster due to his value as a running 
bKk. 

Will Forbes is the kind of football player that comes 
once in a great while. His total dedication and unselfish 
l^y enabled his team to go umtefeated into the East 
Region Playoffs for the second strai^t y«u-. Despite his 
small stature, WiU Forbes showed that he had a big 
heart, giving more than 100% in every pune that he 
played, doing whatever was required of him in order to 
bring his twun victory. 

Congratulations, Will Forbes for your selection as 
Player-of -the- Year by TAe Virginia B&xh Sun. 




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10 Virginia Beach Sun, Ncember 10, 1982 



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CHESAPEAKE, VA. 23324 




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USED CARS; 



Game 6) Washington St. at California 



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FOOTBALL CONTEST SPONSORS • ENTER AND WIN CASH! ! ! 




Rebuilt Carburetors 

Autos - Motorcycles - Marine 

Industrial 

Domestic - Foreign 
2 Blocks Off Providence & Indian River Rd 
812 Gammon Rd 



424-2260 



f*^' 



Game 8) Duke at N.C. State 



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Auto Graphics 




Professional Installation 
•Striping -- 
. • Side Moldings 
"^""^ • Smi'Rooir'"*^ 

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Wholesale & Retail 

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Phone: 4200127 



Game 10) Georgia Tech at Wake Forest 




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Heating and Air Conditioning 

Heating 

Repairs & Replacement 



• Gas 



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% Oil & Gas Burners 

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f Electric 

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Chesapeake 

545-4709 



Game 1 1) Illinois at Indiana 



FOOTBALL CONTEST SPON^RS • ENTER & WIN CASH! ! ! 



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Game 12) Wisconsin at Iowa 




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SHOPPE 



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at ita Beat 24 Houra a Day! ^ 



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l/Jil 1105 N. GEORGE WASHINGTON HWY. 

CHESAPEAKE VA. 



Game 14) Michigan St. at Minnesota 




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10 to 9 



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Game 15) Tennessee at Mississippi 



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Virginia Beach Sun, 10. 1982 11 



Bob Harmon Forecasts Week's College Games 



The Razorbacks of Arkansas put together an 8-3 
season in 1981, finished fourth in the Southwest Con- 
ference, and lost a thriller to North Carolina in the 
Gator Bowl 31-27. Prior to last Saturday's trip to Waco 
to meet Baylor, this year's Hogs were 7-0, but S.M.U. 
and Texas will be waiting to entertain them after tWs 
week's contest with Texas A & M. Through the first 
seven wins, Arkansas had rolled up 199 points against 
opponents, except for Navy and Mississippi, that really 
didn't give them a major test. The Aggies could cause 
some trouble, though the Razorbacks are heavily 
favored, but the road to the conference championship 

will definitely have to be paved with wins over the 
Mustangs and the Longhoms. 

It's difficult not to look West this week as no less than 
three key match-uju dirwtly involve the Pac 10 Con- 
ference championship, the Rose Bowl, and national 
rankings. U.C.L.A. hosts Stanford, Washington 
travels to Arizona State, and Arizona welcomes 
Southern California. Heavy line-up! The Bruins come 
off a road trip to Seattle to finish the season at home. 

They're nip and tuck favorites over Stanford. The 
Huskies, on the contrary, close out their season with 
two road games, and are underdogs to Arizona State. 

The Trojans' final two conference games are also on 
the road before finishing at home against Notre Dame. 

Southern Cal should nip^Arizona. 
Penn State is favored to lose favor with FoUowers of 
the Irish as the Nittanies will beat Notre Dame in South 



Bend. Pittsburgh will pile more woes on the Cadets of 
Army. Tlfe Panthers are huge favorites. 

OktabOQia could have trouble trying to be a bad hcKt 
to visidi^!^is«>uri, But the Sboners arc favored. And 
Nebraska will get a challenge from Iowa State at Ames. 

The Cornhuskcrs should win it. 

Southern Methodist will continue to roll, beating 
Texas Tech, in i»^aration for its home and conference 
finale against Arkansas. 

MAJOR COLLEGES 



Alabama 21-So. Mississippi 17 
Arizona State 23-Wasliington 14 
Arliansas 30-Texas A & M 13 

Baylor 23-Itice 13 

BostoA ColNpe 24-SyniciHe 20 

Briglniii Young 24-San Mego State 10 

California 25-Washington State 20 
Central Michigan 26-Ball State 14 
Colorado 22-Kansas 20 

East Carolina 28-Williani & Mary 7 
Florida State 38-Louisville 



Florida 27-Kentucky 7 

Fresno State 31-Montana State 14 

Georgia Tech 23- Wake Forest 20 
Georgia 20-Aubum 12 

Illinois 21-Indiana 10 

Kansas State 22-Oklahonia State 13 

Long Beach State 24-Nevada-Las Vegas 23 
L.S.U. 24-Mls$issippt State 13 
Louisianna Tech 28-SW Louisianna 17 

Maryland 24-Clenison 21 
Michigan State 24-Minnespta 17 
Michigan 34-Purdtte 10 

Nebras^i 33-10W8 State 8 
New Mi«ico 20-Colorado State 10 
No. Carolina State 26-Duke 21 
North Carolina 40^Virginia 7 

Ohio State 38-Northwestern 6 
Oklahoma 24-Missouri 14 
Penn State 30-Notre Dame 14 



Pittsburgh 45-Army 7 
San Jose State 30-Pacific 10 

South Carolina 21-Navy 20 
So. California 21-Arizona 13 
S.M.U. 35-Texa»Tech 13 

Temple 35-Colgate 7 
Tenitessee 25-Missi8sippi 21 

Texas 23-T.C.U. 10 
Toledo 27-Kent State 6 
Tulsa 2S-Iiidiana State 12 

U.C.L.A. 27-Stanford 20 
Utah State 22-Boise State 10 
Utah 26-Texas-EI Paso 6 

V.P.L23-Vanderbilt21 

West Texas 21-New Mexico State 14 

West Virginia 28-Rutgers 10 

Wisconsin 20-Iowa 17 
Wyoming 24-Wichita State 22 



Win Cash 



'*«» 




Prognosticatom 

Laughon Goes To 
Front Of Class 

In last week's games. Lean and Mean Laughon 
t^dcM 10 out of the 20 games correcfly and Killer 
Barba only picked 9 gaiMS correctly to fall deeper 
into the btaement. Ktshful Brown's once insur- 
mounti^teJead has been rwluccd to one game. As 
it stands now. Big and Bad Coard who takra over 
for Bashful Brown this week, leads with an ov«^ 
record of 112 and 68 for winning percentage of 
62^. Lewi and MeM Laughon is now only one 
game back with a r«ord of 11 1 awl 69 for a win- 
ning percentage of 61 Vo and Killer Barba is still in 
the eiUar with a record of 100-80 for a winning 
p«-<«ntageof55%. . 

With oiJy three weeks left the "Championship' 
is up for grabs although Killer Barba has a long 
way to go to come out of the basement. This week 
has some significant games conference wise and a 
few games thiW m^ even have a bearing on the 
eventual "National Champion." Key conference 
games this week hichide Oemson at M»yland 
(both undefeated in the A.C.C.) and W^hington 
ani Affeim ». The mnim of tte Wadmigton/ 
Arizona St. game could be the teatt t© represent 
the PAC Win the Ro« Bowl on Nw Years Day. 
Other Key Conferewc gamra are L.S.U. at Mbs. 
a., Georgia at Auburn antl Stwiford^ U.p.L.A. 
In a key game among theams ti»t h»v#*to con- 
^^Me aflUiation, th^ » « matahmfi fcetween 
Penn St and Notre Dsnw, the htcr comtng off a 
We upset win over Pittsburg. Games of locrf i^- 
fe^l ai» AppldchttB St. at V.MJ., Bait Carina 
at^liwn and Mary, Virginia at North CardHna 
aad V«. Tech at Vanderbilt. 

♦With wfy three weeks remaimng in the seafon 
aiid Bowl bids only two w«ks away, evwy pune 
Wom^ top0fta»t In this week's c<wti^. T^ms 
that can e3ip«:t a major bowl bid if tl^ wmtiaue 
to vin are iMabMsa, Wisli^lMo. ^ftona St., 
C^rgia, Clemson, Maryland. L.S.U. , OkUtfM»a, 
IWAI^M^t P«n St. and Notre ttune. The 
Ktotional Championship is forem<»t In the nuMto 
of teamistich^asOewrgiaand Ariionaa, two of 
cmly thr« remaining major t«n& that ai« «b- 
^fcat«d. Penn St, Alabama, Clemson iml tkfn 

Mm iyto have im^pm, though dim, of |mta^ 
bat^ M outsi^<4iM tM "National CAam- 



1st Place 

Kevin Fout 
401 25Ui St. Apt 
Va. Beach 



2nd Place 

Trudy Healey 
4929 W. Norfolk Rd. 
Portsmouth 



To enter, just clwck each sponsor on the preceding 
page and find the game. A different game for each 
spoQspr plus a tie-break«. Write down the name of the 
t«un you thtok will win that game in the appropriate 
spac« and the business advertiser's name in Which that 
game is located. Failure to write both in the correct 
space win be d«-lnred n wmng gne<«! Fnter as oft;n as 
you wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision will be final. Entriw must.be post- 
marked no later than 12 noon on Saturday. 



WEEKLY PRIZES ! 



GIFT 

CERTinCATE 
1ST PRIZE 



$ 



GIFT 
iCERTinCATE 
2ND PRIZE 



FOR MOST CORRECT GUESSES 



400 



FOR ANY 
PERFECT GAME 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 



WEEK ENDING Nov. 17 



I YOUR NAME 
I 



.ADDRESS. 



.CITY. 



J»HONE. 



I 



GAME WINNER 



tUffl^SSS ADVEipi^S 



I (GmbcI) 



I (Game 2) 
I (Game 3) 



I (Gaii|c6) 



i <Gaac7> 
t 



GAMEWINNOI 



BUSINESS ADVUmSER 



(Gaaw n) 



^uwl2) 



(Gmmt 13) 



(Game 14) 



(Gum 15) 



(Ganc 16) 



(Cum 17) 



« 



« 



(^hw«) 



^m 



(Game IS) 



iCkamm 



i 



'X^mmm 



imnEAKER: Pick the 
toori mml^ of pants soxed 
l^' Pittsburgh at Army . (. 



TOTAL 



P.O. Box \W 

,VA. 23320 



\ 



J . ^JJJlliWiH 



PiVPV^P 



t^m^^mm 



^i^i^^mmm^r^^mmm 



9 i mmwwmw^w^mmwmv^^^^^vmmmmmm 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 




Gunther, Rad^ To Marry 



Pavilion Quilt Show 

The Tidewater QuUters Guild recently held its Fourth Annual Show at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion. Established in 1979, the Guild today boasts a mem- 
bership of 207 quiltmaking afficianados from all over southside Hampton 
Roads. Standing in front of "3-D Pine Tree" by Janice Streeter of Virginhi 
Beach above are: Angle Harrell (I) and Dorothy Reid (r) of Virginia Beach, 
and Helen Jordan of Norfolk. 



Crime Solv 



Mr. and Mrs. Vernon 
Bernard Markhaqi Jr. of 
Newport News, announce 
the engagement dt their 
daughtfer, Claudia 
Marlcham Ouhthen ittii : 
Barlton Blake Radej of 
Hampton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Blake H. Rader of 
Virginia Beach. 

The bride-elect is the 
granddaughter of Mr. i 
Vernon B. Markham Sr. 
of Newport Ncw|f and the 
late Mrs. Markham and 
the late Mr. and; Mrs. C. 
W. Parker of Scaford. 
She is a graduate of 
Newport News High 
School and the Riverside 
School of Practical Nur- 

Beach V 

f ;■* ■ V -- 

Chapter 

Of AMJW 

To Meet 

The Virginia Beach ^ 
Branch of the American 
Association of University 
Women (AAUW) will 
hold its Nov. meeting on 
Wednesday, NOv. 17 at 
7:30 p^m. in the Life 
Federal building at 
Hilltop. 

The guest speaker will 
be Mike Barrett, assistant 
to the city manager, who 
will speak at 8 p.m. His 
topic will be "Land Use 
Planning and Citizen In- 
volvement". ' 

All Baccala'vreate 
college gradu^ts arc 
welcome." =- *'' 



^.^,-^'' 



sing, Newport News, and 
attended Chowan College, 
Murfreesboro, North 
Carolina. She is employed 
as a librarian for the Daily 
Press Incorporated, 
Hampton bureau. 

Rader is the grandson 
of Mrs. Clara White of 
Matthews and the late Mr. 
White. He is a graduate 
of First Colonial High 
School, Virginia Beach 
and Old Dominion 
University, Norfolk. 

Rader is a certified 
, public accountant and 
^employed as the com- 
ptroller for a local cor- 
poration. 

A 1983>red4ing is plan- 
ned. 




Call 427-0000 



1^ BMck U»toctt¥>Miirtnri DMWMi- ~ «> 




Beach Detectives Nab Two 
Suspects, Charge Thenj With 
Murder, Robbery I \ .^ 



1 


,>^6^1f^^ 


1 


1 


i.N 


1 




Crime Solvers Seekers 
Burglary, Robbery 
Suspects 

As this weeks "Crime Of The Week", Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers is attempting to locate two men for 
crimes committed in Virginia Beach. Crime Solvers will 
pay up to a $1,000 cash reward to anyone who can 
provide information that leads to their apprehension. 

The first wanted person is Michael Keith Miller, a 26 
year old white male, 5'-7" tall, 140 pounds, with brown 
hair and eyes. When last seen, Miller had long hair and 
a beard. He is wanted in connection with two burglaries 
and grand larcenies which occurred on Bay Colony 
Drive in Bay Colony and Duquesne Place in College 
Park. 

The second wanted person is Willie Cleveland Fields. 
Fields is a 27 year old black male, 5'-10" tall, weighs 
165 pounds with black hair and brown eyes. He is wan- 
ted for a burglary and grand larceny from Kempsville 
Discount Furniture in the 5700 block of Princess Anne 
Road. Fields also has a capias on flle for failing to ap- 
pear in General District Court. 

Anyone who has information about these men or any 
other wanted person can call Crime Solvers at 427-0000. 
Crime Solvers will also pay cash rewards up to $1,000 
for information about any crimes or for information 
leading to the recovery of stolen property or the con- 
fiscation of drugs. You may collect these cash rewards 
without ever having to reveal your identity. 



On Nov. 1, 1982, after a 
month long investigation 
into the shooting death of 
James (Pete) Boone, 
Detectives J. TL^an- 
derHeiden and W.M. 
Canfield of the Virginia 
Beach Police Department 
arrested and charged two 
subjects. 

At approximately 1925 
hours, the Virginia Beach 
detectives responded to 
the 2800 Block of Liberia 
Drive Norfolk, Va., and 
with the assistance of the 
Norfolk Police Depar- 
tment, arrested Vincent 
Paul Hill, age 36. He has 
been charged with attem- 
pted armed robbery, use 
of a firearm while attem- 
pting to committ robbery, 
and murder. He is being 
held in the Virginia Beach 
City Jail on $50,000 bond. 

At approximately 2315 
hours, the Virginia Beach 
detectives responded to 
the Union Mission, Nor- 
folk, Va., and with the 
assistance of the Norfolk 
Police Department, 
arrested Theodore Smith 
age 36. He has been 
charged with attempted 
armed robbery, use of a 
firearm while attempting 
to committ robbery, and 
murder. He is being held 
in the Virginia Beach City 
Jail on $125,000 bondv . 

The probable cause for 



these two arrests stemmed 
from information db- 
tained during the ih- 
vestigatioji &a4: inTd'r^ 
mf|,tioa .ptQividtd.,^lm^i^ 
cittzens thf}f|g:h ;h« l,, 
Virginia BeA^ .Crim^- 
Solvers. ,' '•[Q . 

Police Detectives have 
also recovered two 
weapons believed to ^aye 
been used in the robbery 
attempt and liurder. 

Smith 

Promoted 

AtBaak 

Kennect W. Farmer, 
president and chief 
executive officer of Cen- 
tral Fidelity %nk has an- 
nounced the proniotion of 
Virginia BMch ^assistant 
Joan A. Smith to super- 
visor of the bank's cer- 
tificate of depiosit depar- 
tment. * 

Smith is a member of 
the New Hop* flaptfst 
Church in Virgima B«ach 
and secretary of the i^spel 
choir. She is an lu:tive 
participant in the 
Women's Internktional 
Bowling Congress and a 
mender of the United 
Cotincil of Citaens and 
Civic Leagues in Virginia 
Brach. 




AUCTION 

FARM EQUIPMENT 

Salurda> . Novewber 27. iW2 — 10:30 A.M. 

I Rl SIIWATLR P. W(K)Di;STAII 

( AMI>i N. N ( 

l.ihn llmr •% iNlrtnatitmitl i •|Hi|>mrHl 4> A II Km* 

vonu- \IN\ I kiilmriN I^^Mi|mH-Hl 

\\ nil h Uh imK w ilh t-iHii|rir(r iMM|t brf Mfv <«*■ Nmr . 

.iA< ki»kcipij:s 

llitiMk'tl Aialuuicci 

I 140Mcatlol Ki\ci Ktt.ul 

( licsa|>cakc, Viiginra 

lllM»42l-252Sw42l-2MI 

HX.A.L.Hm.un 



Cosmetics 
can only 
do so much. 

Unwanted facial 
hair can't be 
covered up with 
make-up. Hair 
removal is painless 
with REMOVATRON. 
So don't cover it, 
get rid of any 
unwanted hair today, 
at Tidewater'! oily 
^movatroa locatioB... 




Diane Rilxrdy Owner & Operator 

120-DTikteBAve. 

Great Brk^ aiMl CiMupeake 

kfan-Wetf . Fri »4 Tk«n*.7 t«S-f 



I Don T 1 INeecI To Go To ChuRck 



lit. '\i 




Yes, I'm one of those seventy-five millidn Aftwricans who are not members ot 
a church. 

Saturday and Sunday are the two days of the week I like to devote entirely to 
relaxation and recreation. Why should I spend an hour or so in church? 

I try to live straight — to put in a full day's work for my boss, to get along with my 
neighbor, to bring up my children in the proper way. As long as I'm trying to live 
respectably, why do I need to go to church? 

There is an answer, my friend. Since the beginning of history, you and 
millions like you have Ijeen trying to run your lives and this world of ours by your 
own knowledge and strength. You've said you didn't need help. But human 
experience declares that you have failed. The past has left us an ugly picture of 
cruelty and bloodshed, of hate and crime. The present finds us on the edge of 
fresh disaster — of devastating war on the outside and moral decay from within. 
This is the tragedy of man's proud attempt to live without God. 

You need help — help beyond the pale of human resources. You need the , 
love of God that empowers a man to live a good life. You can find this love only in 
your place of worship — in fellowship and communion with Him. He is In His 
Church — forgiving, loving, strengthening, giving men the courage and power for 
right living. 



Sciiplures selected by Tfie American Bible Sodaty 



CopyrigM 1082 KaiMfr Advwfi^ Secvioe 
P. O. Box 1024, CharkMasvWa, \A(ginl« 22906 



C^Kiapeake Savings & Loan 

"*■ 6 Convenient Loaitions 
To Serve You 



^engineering Media, Inc. 

r 1700 E. Liberty Street 
\ ChcMpeake. VA. 23324 
CtuirlesA Dorothy Hack worth 

y , A siufj 



Overton's Maricet 

1419 Poindexter Street 
Chesapeake 

^ $45-9496 

Tite OveHon 'a tutd Employees 



-To^dGlcctrkCo. 

2311 liwlesitk Road 

855-3111 

Moses Todd A Sntff 

Mffl-EMl 

pHpctSbop 

^40 Vfrginu Beach Blvd. 
ViriinHiBea^ 

497-4854 

TeyhrB. Car 
AEm^nyeta 

Prt^,iM. 

45lOPenliroteMaU 

497-4821 

^wa^NmtmA^iaiKes, 
TVs.Mm^ 



aimi^' 

VrntmMiWtmd 



44^1 

LM.BmmA»ilff 



We Care Beauty Salon 

"Hair Care for the 

Entire Family" 

9:30 to 5:00 

Thursday Evenings by 

Appointment 

Closed Monday* 

340-6977 

3870 Holland RoMl 
Virginia Beach 



Pungo Realty Conpaay 

Rural Property Specialists 

"We Service the Entire 

Tidewater Area" 

HEU CULnrrai, BM)KEft 

426-6111 

Day (k Night 

Pungo Profeimnal BIdg. 

Pungo 



Taylor Rental Crater 

• Banquet &. Party Suplies 

• Lawn ^.Garden Equipmmt 

• Contractor's Bquipomtt 

• Auto Repair Ei|ui{»B«t 

• Plumbing EquipmcM 

• Convalescaice Itons 

42(M317 

1217 S. Military Hwy. 

3 Blocks South of 

Ct^kteParkSqtmt 



iiartM'iMnn'Elte 

•HomeeMttd Meals 

■WjcuJti 

•Ddy LwM^ei» pedals 

ForCidlln: 

468-3211 

Ckiera Rna Square 



iiilHi 



Princess Anne 
Equipment Corp. 

John Dtere - Sales & Service 
•Farming 

•Lawn 

•GaricM 

•Accessories 

Daily: 8 to 5 

Sat: Vi Day in Summer 

421-2181 

4653 Battlerield Blvd. S. 
Chesapeake 



The OM General Store 

Calico Fabrics, Handicrafts, 

Handkraft Supplies and Gifts 

Sdcct Anllquct k RtfliMdag 

19 a.ii. (o I. 01 • Qos^ Tmi. 

liMrilcidmtu alSt.BridMU. 

>i Rrldca 

Pungo Power EqoipiMnt 

• Snapper Sales &. Service 

• Live Bait & Tackle 

• Lawn Mower Rqwui 

• Beur.ii^ nuts 

426-53M 

179S Mama Aaac Read 






% 






ii 



I 



CAJPIattciemft 

tt^twkifrieitMeertl 

•'F^CIaaes* 

M^f HlMOHNtoSeirior 



• 1 129 Oeo. Wtfii^m Hwy. 

»entw)Qd-^1-IIM 

•OakCkovtneaMvk^ 

<MOakOrin«lU»d 

•tlMMnd&ree 

PMri'sl-taMH^eatlMi 

HmhWomm 
t D^n^ Wed. ft Ttan. Mm 

424-lM7w^».«48 



I, 



^immmmKm 



^immtmi 



lllillHUllllllllilllillMIIMIUlllllllUlltUIIIIIWKUiam^ 



Virginia Beach Sun. November 10. 1^82 13 



Events To Come: 

t Countryside Christmis Market 427-9009 
Va. Beach Pavilitm, Nov. 27 & i8 



2. Comer Cottage Open House 
@eeMi4>)Nov. 14 



420-6S6S 



3. Marche' Craft Show 497-«l55 ' 
Pembroke MaU. Nov. 1 1. 12 &13 

4. Ontndma'i Attic Open House 468-1002 
(See Map). Nov. 14 



P^;-. . • . Ay:-.- . 

Guide To Virginia Beach 

ARTef & CRAFTef 

TIQUEgT 




Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 




Countryside Christm^ 

Countryside Shqps is sponsoring a Countryside 
Christmas Market at the Pavilion «i November 27 
and 28 featuring many of the finest craftspeople 
and artists in the area. 

Ijocal merchants will also be represented in a 
fecial hdiday section. 

SuppOTt your local artists and craftspec^le for 
Christmas giving! 




I&-' 



COUNTRY HERITAGE] 

—973 Providence Square^ 
Center, 



Everything to warm up the at- 
moshere of your home from 
Handcrtifted Country Fur- 
niture with Hand Carved 
Pan^ A Designs and Hand 
Rubbed Oil Finishes (made in 
the North Georgia Mountains). 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches, Trunks. Decoys, Folk 
Art, Mirrors, Smnces. Tins, 
Handmade Baskets, Weather- 
vanes, Wooden Toys, Country 
Kitchenware. Oak Tables and 
Chairs. 
495-0959 



/> 



r 




Bl 



y6. 



- THE WELCOME 
LATCH 

3478 Holland Ukes 
~ Shopping Center. , 




"We ha'^e everything to 'coun- 
trify' your home." &tch as 
Custom-Made Curtains. Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene Lan^, 
Calico A Lace. Baskets. Rib- 
bons. Hand Dipped Candles. 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures. Frames, 
Country Kitchen, Original Ar- 
twork by Jackie. 15 Rooms 
Fullol M 'handise. 

468-6880 



:Ji^ 



^*K\jr 




h 



TOLL. -ROAT 



:/.* 




\ 



EtANDl^SS rCTC . IN T. 
3470 HolIiMid Lakes ^ 
Shopping Center 




WOODSTOCK HOUSE 

6001 Providence Road 



"Woodstock House For 
Your Country Home. " Choose 
from a vast selection of 
Calicos, Custom made cur- 
tains. Country pine furniture 
A accessories for every room. 
Oil and Electric Lamps. 
Primitive prints and Folk Arts. 

420-3248 



^; 



V*-"-..'. 




We carry everything (£of 
"Back To Country" person. 
You can now enjoy shopping 
for your Country-Style Home 
here because we carry the Han- 
dcrqfted Furniture you desire. 
Also we have Handmade 
OfUco Wreaths, Antique Fur- 
nHure, Cross Stitching, Initial 
PIUows. Custom Made Pillova. 
Wooden Toys, Custom 
Hurricane Lamps A Hdtdersi 
Raffling by the yard. ALSO 
All Furniture made from Pine 
A Made To Order 




-±-e 



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(MOUNTAIN CRAFTS. .- 

479 S. Lynnhavm Road - 



We have a Great Selection of 
Unique Handmade Crafts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tablecloths A Napkins, Quilts 
from Lancaster. PA, Hand 
Dipped Candles. Handmade 
Dolls, Handmade Baskets, 
Wooden Toys, Stoneware, 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine Collectibles. 
463-5279 



M^ 




JCORNER COTTAGE ^ 
^6020 Indian River Court^ 



/^ 



We have the "Heirlooms of 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Friendly Atmosphere. We 
carry the Xavier Roberts Adop- 
tion Babies and have our own 
Floral Designer. Alsoweatrry 
Hand Dipped Candles, 
Williaimburg Arrangements, 
Origtital Artwork by Boggs, 
spKi^iu in Music Box&, New 
EnghndOocks. Sim Catchers, 
Unkfite Rustic Bmkets, Nor- 
man Rockwell Figurines. 
420-«565 



^'PlH>vlX>^^ 




^7S 




^Ati 



-JORDAN'S COUNTRY 
SHOP ; 

^ Comer of Salem ZZ 

[rwkI and Recreation Drive; 



Chtce there you will find a 
unique collection of FM Art, 
Granite Ware. Primitive Pla- 
tings, Sponge Ware, Old 
Fashioned Teddy Bears, 
Baskets Shore Krtb. Stoker 
Reproductions, Tab Curtains. 
Upholstered Furniture and 
Hard-To-Find Ctmntry Itmm. 

467-3085 



:<-.• 




COUNTRYSIDE SHOPSj 

198S Landstown Road . 



fTHE LADY PEDDLER 

- FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA, BEACH 



The "5piop Lady" can he^ 
you with thote ^teM toMhm 
in your cooking with a wide 
variety of ^ices, herbs, teas, 
Jgm$Mdmore. Wetdmlmne 
antSpm, handmade meaths 
(pit» cones, satin A ^e^ 
hand-^^Ved candks, ribb<Ma, 
custom bows, ffower 
arrmnttments (wedangs, pm- 
liesi and hearth swans by 
^Mtmn, 

427-H54 y ,„uimnaut 



Offering a very special collec- 
tion of Local Arts and Crafts 
as well as Collectibles and An- 
tique in a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
^ops featuring Country Fur- 
niture-Handmade, crafts. Fine 
Arts, Pottery. Carved WiUlife. 
Calicos and Quilling Sun>lies, 
ChUdren's Treasures, Herbs, 
Spices, Teas, Antiques and 
Collectives, Stencil Cntfts and 
Folk Art. 
427-9009 



1. The Welcome Latch 

2. Grandma's Attic, Inc. 



3. Countryside Shops 

4. Jordan's Country Shops 



1 Couirtry Heritage 
^ Comer C<Mti^ 



7. Woodstock House 

8. Mountain Crafts 

9. The Lady Peddler 




■^1 



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^ima 



MMAMI 



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m«PHi9iP^i«i««««iViPiP«i«i>«^;<c-, <-» '^ fM.'K>^mmmmmim^mmm^^mmm9fmKimmmmmm<mm^!m 



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14 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



nH^nC I^Mn^nf 



pHMcNMrim 



PuMk NMrtog 



PNMcNMrtag 



On Monday. November 15, 1982, at 2:00 p.m., in the 

Council Chambers of the City of Virginia Beach, the 

City Council will hold a PUBLIC HEARING: 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

OF 

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND EXTEND 

THE FRANCHISE OF 

RESORT SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS. INC. 

An amendment to and extension of the franchise of 
Resort Satellite Communications, Inc., is hereby 
proposed to be granted. Said franchise was awarded by 
the Council of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, on 
March 2, 1981. The franchise granted Resort Satellite 
Communications, Inc., under certain terms and con- 
ditions, the right and privilege to construct, operate, 
and maintain a cable television system within a certain 
portion of the Beach Borough of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 

The following amendment to the franchise of Resort 
Satellite Communications, Inc., has been proposed: 

1. The franchise shall be in accordance with the 
CATV Ordinance which was adopted by the Council of 
the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, on March 17, 1975, 
with the following exceptions. 

a. Subparagraph 6C, describing the initial service 
area, shall be limited to the Borough of Virginia Beach 
(Beach Borough) as it existed on September 1 , 1982, and 
along 19th Street, outside of said Beach Borough, to its 
intersection with Birdneck Ro»^, 

b. Subparagraph 6E shall b« ddeted. 

c. Paragraph 13 of the CATV Ordinance shall be ap- 
plicable to this franchise but subparagraphs 13A and 
13B shall be amended to read as follows: 

13. Security Fund 

A. Within thirty days after the acceptance of this 
franchise, the Grantee shall deposit with the City 
Treasurer and maintain on deposit through the term of 
its franchise the sum of $2,000 in cash and in addition 
shall post a construction performance bond in favor of 
the City of Virginia Beach in the amount of $100,000. 
The cash deposit shall serve as security for the faithful 
performance by the Grantee of all of the provisions of 
this ordinance, except those pertaining to construction 
of the system and compliance with all orders, permits, 
and directions of any agency of the City having jurisdic- 
tion over its acts and defaults under this ordinance, and 
the payment by the Grantee of any claims, liens, and 
taxes due the City which ariise by reason of the operation 
or maintenance of the system. The construction per- 
formance bond shall serve as security for the faithful 
performance by the Grantee of all provisions of this or- 
dinance pertaining to the construction of the system and 
shall be in such form and with such surety as approved 
by the City Attorney. The construction performance 
bond shall be reduced in pro rata increments based upon 
capital investment. 

The reduction and accompanying capital investments 
are as follows: . , , . 

, . . Construction Capital 

Percentage Cost (000) 
250 
500 
750 
1,000 

Upon completion of construction as required by the 
franchise, the Grantee shall maintain an operating per- 
formance bond in the amount of $20,000 for the 
duration of the franchise. Application for bond reduc- 
tion may be made to the City Manager's office. 
E>ocumentation of capital investment must accompany 
this request. Such documentation may be reviewed in 
accord with section 9, paragraph C, and section 11, 
paragraph B. 

B. Within thirty days after notice to it that any 
amount has been withdrawn from the security fund 
deposited pursuant to paragraph A of this Section, the 
Grantee shall pay to or deposit with the City Treasurer a 
sum of money sufficient to restore such security fund to 
the original amount of $2,000. 

2. Notwithstanding paragraph 9A, the Grantee shall 
compute the franchise fee on gross revenues, and with 
the understanding that any increase in the franchise fM 
would be considered as an added expense and, 
therefore, would be passed onto the consumer, either as 
an add-on to the bill or as a part of the rate base. Fur- 
thermore, the Grantee agrees that it will support an ap- 
plication to the FCC when and if City Council, after 
further study and deliberation on its issue, decides to 
request an increased franchise fee of either four or five 
percent. 

3. The fifteen-year period of duration for the fran- 
chise shall be deemed to run from date of adoption of 
this ordinance of amendment and extension. 

Bids for such franchise, as amended above, shall be 
submitted in writing to the Office of the City Manager. 
Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia, on or 
before November 15, 1982, at 2:00 p.m. In accordance 
with State statute, the City of Virginia Beach reserves 
the right to reject any and all bids for such franchise or 
the amendment thereof. 
Ruth Hodges Smith, City Clerk 
City of Virginia Beach, Virginia 
169-2 4T 1 1/10 VB 

PUBLIC HEARING 
The Citizen Advisory Committee of the City of Virginia 
Beach Office of Housing and Community Development 
will sponsor a public hearing on November 17, 1982, at 
7:30 p.m. The hearing will be held in the Library of the 
Center for Effective Learning located at 233 North Wit- 
chduck Road. 
The purposes of the hearing are: 

1. To receive comments and/or recommendations on 
*;tivities to be funded under the Community Develop- 
ment Grant Program for 1983-84. Examples of activities 
eligible for support with Community Development 
Block Grant funds include: acquisition of real property, 
provision of public works and facilities, provision of 
public services necessary to support (MhCT eommunity 
development activities, rehabilitation of public and 
private properties, and removal of architectural barriers 
which rertrict mobility of elderly or handicap^ per- 
sons, etc. 

2, To as%ss program performan^ and progress. All 
ivriJicn ciittcn comments, as well as an assessment of 
each comment and summary of any ■rttos to be taken 
in rcspoBK lo the comment, wiM be wbmitted by the 



Stepl 


25 


Step 2 


50 


Step 3 


75 


Step 4 


100 



Bond 


Net 


Reduction 


Bond 


20,000 


80,000 


20.000 


60.000 


20,000 


40,000 


20,000 


20,000 



City of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 

Development. 

All residents of Virginia Beach are invited to attend this 

public hearing to comment on the needs and progress of ■ 

the neighborhoods. 

If you cannot attend this public hearing, please submit 

your comments to Malissia Lee, Office of Housing and 

Community Development, 302 22nd Street, Virginia 

Beach, Virginia 23451, or call 422-3856. 

171-8 IT 11/10 VB 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

On The Second day of November 1982, the City 
Council of the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, adopted 
a RESOLUTION, entitled: "Resolution Authorizing 
the Issuance and Sale of $19,095,000 General 
Obligation Bonds, Series of 1982, of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. Heretofore Authorized, and Providing 
for the Form, Details and Payment Thereof". 

The purpose for which the bonds are to bt issued and 
the amount of each purpose is as follows: 



SCHOOL PROJECTS, including plan- 
ning, site acquisition and improvement, 
construction, enlargement, renovation 
and equipping of schools and related 
facilities: 



PARKS AND RECREATION PRO- 
JECTS, including planning, site acquis- 
ition and development of new parks: 

ENGINEERING AND HIGHWAY 
PROJECTS, including right-of-way 
acquisition, improvement and extension 
of streets and highways and studies, 
design and construction of drainage 
systems: 

BUILDING PROJECTS including 
planning, site improvement, construction, 
enlargement, renovation and equipping 
of various municipal buildings and 
facilities, including Pavilion, police 
precinct office, landfill expansion, bus 
garage and office, animal control 
incinerator, energy conservation pro- 
gram, health department and community 
college: 

TOTAL 



$6,401,755 



$691,216 



$8,071,320 



$3,930,709 



By order of the City Council of the City of Virginia 

Beach, Virginia. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 

City Clerk 

City of Virginia Beach 

171-10 IT 11/10 VB . . . . . ' ,,, 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ^^ 

The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, November 17, 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. Edward and Loretta Kardel requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 79, Block 5, 
Phase Ul-C, The Lakes, 3327 Boynton Court. Princess 
Anne Borough. 

2. Barry C. and Brenda J. Reade requests a variance to 
allow parking of major recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 35, Block A, 
Section 2. Lake Placid, 2552 Placid Place. Princess An- 
ne Borough. 

3. Hyrum 1 hornock requests a variance of 4. 1 feet to a 
25.9 foot front yard setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (covered porch) on Lot 192, Gardenwood 
Park, 5465 Sunnywood Drive. Bayside Borough. 

4. Theodore L. Spilman, III and Lt. Vicki M. Spilman 
requests a variance of 10 feet to a "0" side and rear yard 
setback (southeast corner) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (deck and storage shed) on Lot 622, Section 10, 
Malibu, 3617 Sea Horse Way. Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Associated Aluminum Product Company, Inc. 
requests a variance of 9 parking spaces to 29 parking 
spaces instead of 38 parking spaces as required (addition 
- office warehouse) on Paicd B. Kempsville Plaza 
South, 5250 Challedon Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

6. Beach Car Wash, Inc. requests a variance of 1 free- 
standing sign to 2 free-standing signs instead of 1 free- 
standing sign as allowed on SO feet of Lot 2, and part of 
Lot 24, eastern 50 feet to Lot 3 through 14 and all of 
Lots 25-36. Block 40. Aragona, 4981 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Bayside Borough. 

7. Henry Sargent requaU a variance of 4 feet to a 6 foot 
rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (ac- 
<»ssory building) on Lot 39, Block 17, Section 2, 
Arrowhead, 212 E. Ottawa Road. Kempsville Borough. 

8. Ernest C. Consolvo reqt^sts a variance of 10 feet to a 
25 foot setback from Garrett Drive and 4 feet to a 31 
foot setback from Columbus Loop instead of 35 feet 
each as required (office addition) on Lots 24 through lot 
29, Block 40, Sunny Brook. 4560 Columbus Loop. 
Bayside Borough. 

9: John W. and Beth M. Aldri(%e requests a variance of 
5 fwt to a 25 foot front yard Mtback instead of 30 feet 
as r«]uired (residential additkM) on Lot 7, Nock I. Sec- 
tion 3, Fox Run, 4790 R<»ecroft Street. Kempsville 
trough. 

10. Robert M. Devine requnts a variance of 20 feet to a 
30 foot front yard setback (Ruthesay Road) instead of 
50 feet as required on Lot 51, Bay Colony, 912 Bay 
Colony I^ive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

1 1 . G^H-ge H. and Cynftia^. Ritko requ^U a variance 
of 9.7 ftti to a 0.3 fod wk yard s^back (east udc) in- 
%te^ of 10 feet as r«itiin^ (cteck) on Lots 45 and 46, 
Block 10, Salt Marsh P««» 1304 Pm^ve Drive. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

12. Mr. and Mrs. Bill AinMt requaU a variaiKx of ^ 
feet to a 30 foot front ^ud tetlMack Instep of 50 fm as 
raqw^ M Lm is, Tr^ D, Return 3, 



13. Jerry L, and Deborah A. Ferren requests a variance 
of 6 feet to a 14 foot side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 20 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot Z. 
Gum Bridge. 1944 Gum Bridge Road. Pungo Borough 

14. Alan T. Gregory requests a variance of 10 feet to a 5 
foot side and rear yard setback (northeast comer) in- 
stead of 15 feet each as required (accessory building) on 
Lot 2, Sectioi^3. Bay Colony. 1324 N. Bayshone Drive. 
Lynnhaven Boirough. 

15. Scott E. and April P. Miner requests a variance of 9 
feet to a 1 foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 10 
feet as required (deck) on Lots 39 and 40. Block 10, Salt 
Marsh Point. 1316 Preserve Drive. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

16. Tom O'Brien Contractor. Inc. requests a variance of 
20 feet to a 30 foot front yard setback instead of SO feet 
as required on Lot 8. Tract D, Section 3. Sandbridge 
Beach, 3628 S. Sandfiddler Road. Pungo Borough. 

17. Dr. Harold J. Levinson requests a variance of 20 
feet to a 10 foot setback from the 15 foot alley adjoining 
the easty property line instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot) on Lot 6 and 18, Block 23. Croatan BMch, 
S. Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. ' 

18. Dockside Associates, by F. Wayne McLesk«y 
requests an appeal to waive or modify the condition that 
the two (2) open canopies approved by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on March 5. 1980 not be enclosed on a 
6 acre-Parcel, Lynnhaven Colony, 2128 N. Great Neck 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1 . Arthur A. Dy requests a variance of 9 parking spaces 
to 10 parking spaces instead of 19 parking spaces as 
required (restaurant) and to allow vehicular 
maneuvering directly incidental to entering or leaving a 
parking space into a public street or alley where pro- 
hibited on Lot 3. Block 12, Virginia Beach Develop- 
ment, 205 1 1th Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 

2. Ronald J. Novak requests a variance of 2 feet to a 3 
foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 5 feet as 
required and of 1 foot to a 9 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (accessory building) on Lot 
21, Block 51. Aragona Village, 713 DeLaura Lane. 
Bayside Borough. 

3. A. T. Leidy, III requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a front yard setback on Lot 12. Block 20, 
Chesapeake Park. Lauderdale Avenue. Bayside 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST.APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

W. L. Towers 

Secretary 

171-3 2T1 1/10 VB 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY PROJECT 

GREAT NECK ROAD 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

A Design Public Hearing will be held by 
representatives of the Virginia Department of 
Highways and Transportation on December 8, 
1982. at 7:(K) p.m., in (he Cox High School 
AiiUiinriuni loca(cil al IK4K N<»nh (heal Neck 
Road Mi Virginia Ik-acli. Tor llic piirpiisc ol con 
siik'ii.iig ilio |>nip«»Ntil ticsigii or (ileal Neck Ktiad 
IVoin »).0I iiiile iiorlh ol Slloietiaveii Drive lo llic 
inccrseclon ol Shore Drive (Roulc 60), in I lie Cily 
of Virginia Beach. 

All inlcrcsied parlies arc urged to attend and 
give ihe Department the benefit of their comments 
and suggesiions relative to the proposed highway 
iniprovcnienl. 

Maps, drawings, a final cnvironnicnial 
document, and other information are available for 
public review and copying in the Department of 
Highways and Transportation District Office 
located at 1700 North Main Street in Suffolk, in 
its Residency Office located at the intersection of 
Business Route 13 (Military Highway) and Route 
168 in Chesapeake, and in the office of the Direc- 
tor of Public Works for the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

Representatives of the Department will be 
present at the Cox High School Auditorium from 
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the afternoon of the public 
hearing, for an informal review of available in- 
formation by interested citizens. All interested 
persons are encouraged to review the proposal 
prior to the formal hearing. 

Wriiicn statemenis and other exhibits relative to 
Ihe proposed projecl may be presented in place of, 
or ill addilioii to. oral slalcmcnis al llic hearing. 
Such wriiicn slalenienis and exhihils may alstt be 
.suhiuillcU lo llic Deparlmcnl al any lime wilhiii 
Icii days alter the public hearing. 

Al this design public hearing, relocation 
assistance programs and tentative schedules for 
right of way acquisition and construction will also 
be discussed. 

State Highway and Transportation 
Commission of Virginia 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
V^ninia: 

The r^ular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach wiU be h«ard in the Council Chamb^i of the City 
Hall Building. Munidpal Center, Princess Anne 
^tion. Virginia Be»:h. Virginia on Mowli^ Novonber 

22, 1M2, at 7:00 p.m., at which time the foUowing ap- 

ftical&cs^u will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

VIRGINIA WACH BOROUGH: 

1. Aa Ot^immt upon An)li(ation of CSiartes R. 

MObon aw! John F, Malbon for a CHANGE OF 

Z0ND40 DISTRICT CLA^IFICAT1(M4 froB k-$ 

Resi^atial Dutrict to R-8 Resi4«atl«I MMriet 

0fotfffed from A-9 i^artment IMstrict) on hot 75, 

Lnk^ra Ptfk touted at the Northwest mmim^ of H«rf^ 

RMdMd WcM HoHy Kotd. SM parctl k kown m 300 

W^ H^ Road and contidn 1.03 aa». VIRGINIA 

nACHK)R(MJOH. 

otN^MncMiiAL vm PERMrra: 

VmOIMA BEACH BOROUGH; 



2. An Ordinance upon Application of OUver F. lUdd, 
Jr., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a medical 
office (Osteopathic Physidan) on property localcd m 
the North side of 22nd Street, 110 feet EaM of 
Mediterranean Avenue and known as Lot C, Btock 33, 
u shown on Map 6, Virginia Beach DevdopowDt Com* 
pany, and located at 513 22nd Street. Parcel contains 
6098 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH- 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of John C. Asirin- 
waU, III, for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
mini-wardiouses on (xrtain propoty located oo tli^ 
West side of Rosemont Road banning at a poist 1€1 .74 
feet South of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Toll Road, 
running a distance of 136.56 feet along tte West «de of 
Rosemont Road, running a distance of 136.32 feet fai a 
Westerly direction, running a distance of 175.01 feet In 
a Southerly direction, running a distance of 471M feet 
along the Southern property line, running a dIstaiKX of 
460.44 feet along the Western propoty One, numing a 
distance of 350.34 fMt along the Northern propeily Une, 
running a distance of 199.97 feet in a South«rly direc- 
tion and running a distance of 245.07 feet in an Eagerly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.81 acres. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Gate Petroleum 
Company for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for an 
automobile service station on certain pr(q;)erty located 
on the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard bq^- 
ning at a point 200 feet more or less West of Hl^way 
Lane, running a distance of 200 feet along tlw South 
side of Virginia Boulevard, running a distance of 144.74 
feet along the W»tern property line, running a distance 
of 200 feet along the Southern property line uid run^ng 
a distance of 144.74 feet along the Eastern prc^Mrty Um. 
Said parcel contains 28,948 square feet. LYNNHAVBN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Miller (Ml Cmn- 
pany. Inc.. for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
an automobile service station on property located at tlM 
Southwest corner of Poplar Point Rc«d and Nordi 
Great Neck Road, running a distance of 190.17 feet 
along the West side of North Great Neck Road, nianiBg 
a distance of 125 feet along the Southern property Kae, 
running a distance of 150 feet along the Western iMropcr- 
ty line, running a distance of 105.17 feet along the Smith 
^de of Poplar Point Road and running around a curve a 
distance of 31.25 feet. Said pared contains 1S,750 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENT: 

6. Motion of the Planning Commission of the C^ of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
6. Section 602(e) of the Comprehnisive Zonliqg Or- 
dinance pertaining to maximum density r^uiatkuis ia 
th^ A-1 Apartment District. More detailed iofoniiatkm 
is available in the1>epartment of Planning. 

PU\ts with more detailed information arc available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All\inta^ted perKms are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith .^ , 

City Clerk 

171-1 2T 11/10 VB 



Ufilllftica 



I, Robert J. Rustanbach, 
vdll no longer be req;>on- 
sible for any debts of Ger- 
trude A. RustenbKh con- 
tracted after February 12, 
1982. 

Robert J. Rusetenbach 
3904-202 Lakefront Qrde 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23432 
I7M2T11/10VB 

Take notice that on 
November 17, 1982, on 
the premises of A-1 Auto 
Repair. 204 First Colonial 
Rd., Virginia Beach, Va. 
the undersign«l will sell at 
pubUc auction, for cash, 
reserving unto himself the 
right to bid, the following 
motor vehicles: 1966 Ford 
4 Door Sedan IDI 
6H42H140294 and 1971 
Buick 2 Door Hardtop 
ID#444371H181396. 
Cindy Alberts 
A-1 AutoRqjalr 
204 First Colonial Rd. 
Virginia Beach. Va. 23454 
171-6 IT 11/10 VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
TAKE NOTICE THAT 
ON NOVEMBER 12. 
1982 at 10:00 a.m. at the 
premises of TIDE- 
WATER IMPORTS, 
INC. DBA HALL PON- 
TIAC GMC HONDA. 
INC. 3152 Virgiiua Beach 
Blvd., Virginia B«K;h, Va. 
23452. the undersign^ 
will mU at pablic auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 
Klf the right to Md. the 
foUowing motor vdifeles: 
1^2 AMC Spirit, S^ial 
#1AMBC4304CK]685»; 
1977 Chevrolet, Serial 
#1H57U7B471366; 1980 
Jeep, Serial f JCNbfgSAB- 
^3999; im CiMvrotet 

$mmnn$iumimmi. 

lUiMto^ Importt Im. 
MA Hall I^mtMG 
OMC Honda, Inc. 
W.C.Mm 

171-7 IT 11/10 VB 



NOTICE 
In re: William M. An- 
drews, Jr. «ka B^iddy An- 
drews Debtor 
To the crediton of the 
above-named (WNm^: 

NOTICE IS HEREBY 
GIVEN that it iK>w ap. 
pears there are assets fr^ 
which a dividend may be 
pttid. Claims shall be filed 
on or before January 4, 
1983. 

If you have previous^ 
filed a (dalm in ^s case, 
you nMd not file again. 

Dated at Norfolk. 
Virginia, November 3, 
19S2. 

Notice CHvaa Wy-. 
Howard K Glascock, 
Oerk 

United States 
Bankruptcy Court 
By Myriane E. Rodiguez 
de Seville, D.C. 
Mail Qaim F(Nrms to: 
Office of the Oerk 
United States 
Bankruptcy Court 
P.O.Box:^00 
Norfolk, Va. 23301 
ItU/lOVB 



Porter 

Gets 

Degree 

Hm PNcepttv^OtgiM 
oi Bett ^aa fU km 
been &mhn^ oa M«y* 
lyn Fortar. Jhe nit bea- 
oKd dwiag m» mm 
flMcting of Fitetpm M- 

^ Mu Ckmim htiii m 
the iMM oi iMm dMM, 
136COyi«jrd(^uft. 

llMctevterwtt^ai 
tN Nm« (^ MMfir Uh 
m^ ^ M Con 
Itoad on iliu^^» tm. 
23 to w&rtt ofn w^ 




486-3430 



Chesapeake Post, November 10, 1982 15 





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^Kiimmcmmwtm bios 

The School Bpvd of the Oty of 

§M^«d^ I'l^'q^r th? $ite jnj-^ 
prdvemenb fdr W^t kc^psvll^ 
Eli^tajHiy '^^th66\ tbt tie"! 
Sc#<id'^faiMM^6r<t]ie dty of 
Vii^%eiBh^ Vti«iAt8 6cach, 

BiickiN4'aQt>^bi^i4aK at the 
of £ne (^ ]^M Admim^ntioa 

Viq^uiifi.J^^h. ..y4rfiii|ij| imtU 
30:00 '9|cl5^k l^ Preypulliig 
Tinie wj i' ^Qy^bcr 1982' aod 
thrtl"a ' tttii pirifice piibficly 
op<^ibd^Mlp\ia. < . ; 

"Wie^i^iK^dufe Ibi' withiftawal 
of bidi JshaB' Be 'accG^tfing^to 
Chapter 4, Section 11-20.2(1) of 
thff£M«ef!Vtteinbi< < ,< . . 

1^ <2!0M|^lpqn<r«ct It 10 toi 



Title 54, Chapter 8. Article I, 

Code of Virginia' to show irtlden-' 

• it thai they possOJ* a! curfeht '■ 

,Hcen$e from the State Board ot^ 

Cpntractors to engage in ce^;, 

ttacting. The biddpr shaH ^c> ] 

'on the outside of the eiveiope ' 

' cdritaMing his bid ' oVer his ' 

^^Unuttre dte followitag hbkatibn ' 

"tiiem|e(| Virginia Coatractor v 

No.-n— " apd Chesapcakp Cqr-.; 

, tractors License No.— -"^ ^ . 

Eaich Proposal must bl*^ ac- 
companied by a bid bond In the " 
amount equal to notkss than ten . 



GMC - % Sierra Grande Street 
Coupe, i (0M maroon and 
orange, 60,000 niiles. Se^ to ap- 
prectittb, lomleid, 4 ilew LR60 
RemiA^en Riadiais, S4200 or 
best oiTer. 428-8013. 

' U '; 54T10-17 

FOiUk'1973 pickup, autoinatic 
transmission, wagon wheels,, air 
shocks, good running condition. 
$1700. Call 547-2338. 

5-2T-11/10 



percaaMIO%)of the profK^saJ, 
The City of Chesapeake 



ex- 



' pfissly reserves therigtii to reject 
any or all proposals, to waive 
any - informalities in thir 
proposals received, an)d t? iKoop 
that, proposal which jn Jts 
judgement best serves the fnterest 
'oftlwCity. ,''.;•. 

Thii Project is located in and 
along IHm. rights of wlay streets in 
uveral )ppatioiu,iii Gt^ Prijdge 
Area, cbnslstinE of 



wea, consisting oi ap- 
jj , . . prbxiihilelyM73f±)L-tbf8". 







apfiartencancct. 



1 IT | l- iP 



cMWii»,''Ndrtolk,'Vi#gblia, the; 
Do^gCiPiiri^Mqi, RichdiDnd, 
YafiMMi'AktMiadta Ex- 
change of Richmond, Inc., 
Ricl^n)9nd><^<VlAliv*n<> a>4h« 
ofO^olp^Mfi^Uifi^ Waiter, 

Be^n, - vMittia 23451 , 
Telii^nHwi)42^-2468. 

SiWHi -^niWriits ana 
Spe^Mlati^'hiiy t^''6t^fled 
ax-msi<iimdi''hf itli Archttea 
upddiifl^eitititt'>hcd6ihpanicd' 
byasd^mlt bl'iXhtOjpa sat:' 
UrfWrtjflrt^pt-iJf 4»w tJOmWetft a«t 
of drawings and sp^fipBtiont,. 
within 10 days after the bid 

othU ^|li^e't<^'>ett^ thi 
^ coAi>l^«^^^^l^dityi(wiU' 
♦ 'coMttittitiJi jiHett'tlt* ''ik the'' 

deposit. ■ ^~t:<-;i !'■• '■ 

BHt SdcaMyQ A Wddet'idbeiid 

or certified check will t>e required 



five percent of the Base Bid. The 
•rid bond shall be executed on 
AIA Document A3 10, or in the 
S MM^ f OT m£ <njf for apqiod of 
m Um than 30 <%)» afte^ the bid 
oLning tSUli^mbm^ check 
statt-be i»yiWe-tir the Sehort' 
Board of the.C^^-^f, Virginia 
Beach. ■ • •*' ' 

th^Ch^itier 9i«i^e("the fight 
to-'i4v^ titf^kiatees 'and to ' 
reject any or all bids.* '^^^ ' ■ ' 

flUdd^ aOMMfittatiK^inntiad to 
the reqi|i^«mt«l3 !»f <Iitle' 54( 
OWIffft-^Hot' thflCode of 
Viiii^i^ , . pierta^^ng. 19 

Tl^k^po) Boaj^d 



Shop for Cl^i^qjia^. 



i^' 



iZ> NI'MMU 



RECEIVE vA MASJUtCARO 

OR. Visa. Guaranteed, not>ody 
refused: for free brochure call 
Home of Credit; toll free 1-800- 
443«159J anytime.. ; . d 

,:;'j '■.-." : , . ; 2llFH 

RECEIVE A MA^TEKCARV 

or Visa. Cuan^tesdi , aeimdy 
refused; for free brochure $iiO i 
House of Credit toll free 1-800- 
442-x'5ai. 

2.4TH-17 



4. Avtot 



iPsll, 



lyrii/io 



RfiWNfSHWO - 26 years 
experlMUW^^ ThdrnMiKille, 
DrffUci^ iBOlan Allen. Dr«*. 
C^ «4 J^lop^/ We aJfpdo 
antiquing and all kinds - i^ 
repairs. 905 High Str«t, Vm- 
t$mouth,VAJWt9M6. ' J- 



BELL^^IIU.^XtER 
IMPROVEJteNT l>RO jtCt. 
S3u;%(bcJ<HAiEIl ,'' 
aty of Chesap*al*^^11ipiia 

The ^ty iif f^HmP**¥*> 
Virginia wUJ ijeceive sealed bids 
in accordaribe'with the law;" for 
construction of the aboVe |MrOject ' 
until 2:0» o'ctoCk #.». tocaiaiir 
on the ITHi da(pi wt Bintf m^w,' ; 
1982. at tte,«ffice^^ M*e mi/. 
Engineer, De^rim^tqf Public 
Works, EngioMri^^ OiVistoa, 
Chesapeake Ovic Center, Public 
Service Building, Albermarle 
Drive. Chesapeake, Virginia. 
Kds will be publicly opened and 

read aloud at ttM^^fMNf^ 
to be submitt^i^t|e.fttt»theil 
form on the Md Fropwal, in 
sealed envelopes beadnt^ W^ 
ders name and aig^i^tiW 
cteariy marked "Md m Mi 
Mill Wal«L JB»ro*f ^t 
Project, Ptaf^lM 

Orawints aiw Speeifit^ 
mar be exanloel withovt charge 
t^f -Ihe qity 
»t of Pjiblic 
talvttion. 

be obtttMd 

d«psjl 'fty Dollars 

U41I will bf 

j^v"rrturri Of ttH 

Pni'iiiyiti <i< ' 1tptrtif!-ii"-~"' in 

good awlM» lwWw»-<^tW 




d«|M3Mi 

»-4 



FORD GRANADA - 197S, looks 
like new, »3n/fm ctt^tt, upv 
tires, #12 wspection. Low down, 
owner fihahcing. tall 483-CI 14. 

4^T-12/1 
DATSON - i*M>, 1!>73, 
automatic, am/fm can^e. w>«t 
transQottation, Vov/ dowi, owner 
wiU fmance. (CalJ 483-01 14 

44T-12/1 

FtlRD LID - ttn. Landau, ex- 
cellent condition^ loaded. Low 
d(wm, owner will- Finance. Call 
483-0114 

4:|T-ll/^0 . 

CHEVETK - 29», Excelleat 
condition, 4 door. 4 ^M^l, air 
conditioning, take over paymen- 
U. $135. Call 483-01 14. 

4-lT-U/lO 

ai£VY-19B0 Mbnza, 2 ifoor, 
am/fm 8 track, 4 cylinder, good 
on gas. Good condition. S3,000. 
CaU 422-9039. 

4-4T»ll/24 



FOKD Cl^SrrQl^-lM. 28^ 
oq^, autoinatic transmtsstbn, 
4 doo/. All orti^nal, runi ^M, 
looks great, no nm. M<8&4ias 
ne»er been^Mie'into. iPo««r! 
tram fftat. ' Lmi Aan 88,000 
nMle«, tf <Ni«ML CoUegton; 
item. $1^ will talk trade. Catt; 
E^ve at 5474571 between 9 and 
5orafto^:SS«aU^-®9Q; , , 
4-TFN' 



CADILLAC - 'W, SevMIe, 
afl»JmmtomSM/waai am- 

25» 



4^-11/10 




i. Jiotercycltt 



HQNDvi- 1979GL-1000. 11,700 
mild, am-fm stereo and cassette 
tape'deidk. BlacHc with gold trim. 
Coplplcte tour kit. *3.500. Call 
547-8413 after 5 p.m. 

TFN 



tilMrtt 



usia&i ^D uisE • vn^i 

witlibnr (UetMgr" Reproji^raiil' 
' yow fubcdhadous:' Tt'Wbrlts:^'^ 
Snid$t2:9« toPMitlve Bdta^ior 
pevelopmoat, 1579 S. Maw, ; 
iStreet,^ Chambersburg, PA ^ 

P1AN9V MAN-PART TIME- -■ 

Cjen^al Mainjenance, sw/oepin^,.. 
c^i^ii|g. painting, aii<i miqqr' ^' 
rcpkiirs. 'Lointen' Bri^se area! ' 
CallMr.©.rtttrt.^40-«3ti. ^ 
n - . 104r-12/.l t. 

xsKdw ioint o^ innJnif. * 

'F*^copy48pg Planting Otiide^' 
), Catalogrin color. One of ithie :■ 
jOjpst complete, 4ines,qf pi Wint/t;; 
, mater^l. of f^re^ jn Virgii)|a, in- , 
' tl^ding (ruiVtr?es, hut' trees, 
' l)trry'|flahts', grape viireS, ' iSh- '' 

dscaping plant 'milt^ridli; / 
. WjtfifesbOro Nurseries, Iflc, 

AyaynesJ^oroVA 22980,. ^ 

JUNi^ CAR&iANp TRUCJ(6Tnl< 

towed free. Sotne bought. C#- 

■ 4«5-i9*foriW5-585^.' , 

■ GUN SHOW -Decembet ' 
18thJUUl..lik^ 1982..^.Uii:|^i|||aCa 

in the amount of no? !;;« g^^, «^y]K?rae,-19|h,ajjd,P§8if^!;/, 



CAftLSON' JET BOAT - 1978, 
23 foot, .cuddy cabin, Tandem 
Trailer, low hours and fast. 
Asltini '$6,98i5. Call 4*0-3573. 
AfWir5i5a»48I-0096. 

■i; ;":;■/ ' -8-TFN 

15 ', Flilifei^qL ASS BOAT- 

Eviiirude mp^or, tralifer included. 
All ill iocA sHape. Mtist sell. 
$750 or best offer. Call 463^550. 

8 



lOiH^W^antMl 



I2i^ 



UPositiM^WwiM 



GENERAL HOVSEcleaning, 
reliable and experiencxd. Call 
140-1389. 

11 TFN 



12. ItatiMts O^wlimity 




GERMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pie - AKC registered, fw pet 
or show. $150 and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARDS. CaU 488-8085. 
13-Tn«l 

miDS - EXOnC. Taking or- 
dmft layaways. Now fiiuuicing 
fOrChristmas. 421-9554 

.' >?-4T-U/l9 

SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 

Point, registered; champion 

sired, (how quality, $200. 481- 

33S8 

13TFN 

YORKSHIRE Terrier puppies - 6 

we^. AKC, 2 females. 499- 

4329. 

134T 11-17 

PETS-PIease help us by givnig' 
a loving pet a home. We are a 
non-profit organization, but 
we will gladly take donations. 
We are in need of Foster Paren- 
ts for our pets. Please call W- 
7630, 481-6654 or 399-8321 if 
you can help. Animal 
Assistance League. 

13-TFN 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

Immediate opi,eiUBg?,- overseas 
and domestic. 2Q.<So6 to 50,000 
plusayear. 'qaili:3f2-920-9675 
ext.^447X. " '-'•'■ 

- ■« yi^ 104T-11/ 

Sioi^ DAILV-earnings working 3 
hours a day at home. Your ear- 
nings fully guaranteed in writing. 
For complete details and ap- 
plication, please send a self ad- 
4rcssed eoYcloRc to; E.V„272C 
kocco Dr., Harrisonburg^ VA 

^2801. ; ; ' 

; ; i : i .10-4T-H/24. 

^NOGRAPHEli - \<A Law 

^ffice. 9 am fit 1 p'.ioJ ifasi ac- 
curate typuig required. S^d 
resume to: Outland, Grey, 
O'Keefe and Hubbard. P.O. Ekix 
i545.-ChesaiJe«ce. VA 23320 

I0-4T-11/10 

YOU SAW US ON PM 
Magazine/Today Show. Now 
see US' m yotfr home. Have a 
home lingerie party br become an 
l/NDERCOVERWARE agent. 
Call Sandy coUect at 1-245-8764. 
lfr4T-ll/10 

WANTED SALES- 

Representative Por Noirfolk and 
Virginia Beach. Also dealers for 
toys, gifts, electronics, beach imd 
camping at guaranteed sales 
pricef. Inquire at L. & L 
Distributors. 9912 Warwick 
Blvd.', Newport News, VA 
23601 Or Cair877-2939. 

ia4T-ll/24 



*a.«.lo^ii^ 



Wi»ftm% V* ^priMr 



Wln^ivt, iMor T^m Of 



R.H. BLAO^ 



POINT 

' Homt sites for sale 

for 
y ^ople Planning 
Homes A Custom 
Builders 

: SAtesorric* 

333 Pf o*ld#iicf M. 
C*tt4«^l7 



16.ArtielmFM-Salt 



WELL DRILLING RIG • Por- 
table, will go any where. 
Removable axel. 100 feet of pipe 
and tips. $1495. CaU 543-0205 or 
425-0722. 
; 16 4T 11-17 

WOOD STOVE - Gatlfng type, 
used 1 year, $350,495-3621. 
16-4T-12/t 

WEDDING DRESS - Size 12. 
Veil and chapel train, excellent 
condition. $100. Call 424-6292. 
164T 11-17 



OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS 

— Jean Sibp^ Chlldrens Shop - 
Dress Shop. $5,900 to SI 6,500. 
In store training. Ctoand 
dpening. Fixtures iasta^d. 
Call right now! Mr. Gibson at 
501-329-1360. 
, 12-2T-11/17 

THE LbVE inOP FtaiKhbe 
has storeoviner/opeiittor oppor- 
tunity in the Va. Beach area. For 
pore infonnation ptease write 
^d send resume to: The Love 
Shop. 2428 Gravel dr.. Ft. Wor- 
th.Tx.7611f:~ 

124T 11-17 



17. Furnlturt 



CHAIRS - 2 livingroom 
traditional light blue. Excellent 
conditioned; $160. Call 482- 

5353. , , , , .^, 

17 4T 11 -17 

,... i ' ;. _,..:■/ 

MUST SELL l^fOVING - 2-pc. 
bedroom set; dresser w/mirror, 4 
drawer chest, bookcase bed. AU 
' hardwood construction, light 
walnut. Excellent coitdirion 
$325. 340-7689. 
17 4T 11-17 

3 PIECE SOLID TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" long, lots of 
storage space for tapes and 
records. Has Sony reel-to-reel 
tape deck and Sony receiver 
SR605O, 30 watts per channel. 2 
Sansui speakers. SP2000. Space 
in cabinet for turntable. All for 
$800. CaU 588-5811. 

17 TFN 



IS^AntlqiiM 



29> MnNoI luliMiMiits 



GUITAR - 6 STRING, ejKellent 
condition. Must seU. $150. Call 
497-6280 after 6. 

20-lT-ll/lO 



21. T«lt«ltlMl/StMl|0 



MAGNAVOX-TV, console, very 
good condition. $300. CaU 424- 
1288. 

21-4T-11/24 



^ItMlry 



23. C«im/Ste9S/IMMM 



IVORY COLLECTION 

Statues, Netsike. Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
necklaces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
granby St., 625-91 19. Daily 10-5. 
18 TFN 



NEEDLECRAFT INSTRUC- 
TORS wanted: Work 10-12 
hours perweek, earn 70<100 
commission, ^t your own 
hours! NO DELIVERIES, NO 
INVESTMENTS, NO 

COLLECTING. Complete 
training. Car and Phone 
necessary, ART CRAFT OON- 
CETTS. CaU Majorie 340-5782. 
Sharon 427-2064, and Jane 424- 
2044. 

23-4T-I1/10 



24. Wanted Ttlqr 



JUNK CARS WrKked or nia- 
ning, cash-free towing. We alto 
buy used radiators and bmakt, 
7 days a week. CaU 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 340-1059. 

24tFN 

CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We bu^ one piece 
or entire housefulls. Abo, good 
used furniture. CaU 4;22-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 



25.60MlTliiRpT«Eat 



FRESH TURKEY'S - LocaUy 
raised and dressed. $1.30 lb. Or- 
der now for Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. Carey Poultry Fann, 
467-3078, 467-0251, or 461-1580. 
25 4T 11-17 



26. EnttrtalnnMnt 



FOR SALE-70 Balhoom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dui^ for' 
more information 480-1154. 

i6-TFN 



29. Lawn A CardM 



32.liitlMssFarltoiit 



STOKPS JVND STORAGE 
AREAS - All sizes. Prcqjerties 
unlimited. Marvin Ooldfarb. 
399-8390. 484-r275. 

'32 TFN 



33.AMrteMateForRiiit 



APARTMENT HEAIK^AB- 
TERS - Great Bridfc- 4 
lodtions, one and 2 bedroom 
apartmenu. From '260. Rental 
office, 482-3373. eveninis 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Itoad. 

33TFN 



LADIES lEWEUlY FOR SALE 

Om ladies cocktail ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 carat yellow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white gold 
23 jewel Iwlie Bulova watch. 
Ring 3MH>ra>Md at S3400 and 
watch ai^raiMd at S1900. WUl 
seU either for half the appraised 
value. Call 547-0858 aftc^ 5:00 
p.m. 22 TFN 



34.iaa(mF«rlteRt 



FRUIT TREES-Nut trees, berry 
plants, grape vines, landscaping 
plant material-offered by one of 
Virginia's largest growers. "Free 
cow-of 4& pue Planting fiiMrtir . 
Catalog in color on request. 
Waynes Boro Nurseries, Inc., 
Way?esf>oro, Va. 22980. 

29-4T-I1/24 

ACTION TREE SERVICE - A 

professional complete tree ser- 
vice. 20 years experience. 
Licensed and insured. Free 
estimate. CaU 399-7011. 
29-TFN 

MULCH4UTLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, trucklpad, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 
' ■ ■ ■ 29 TFN 

iOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 

29TFN 



M.ital Estate 



RAREOPPoimiNmr 

Bay a Home at Your Own Price. 
26 Houses & 2 Building LoU 
Selling IndividuaUy at AUC- 
TION Sat., November 20th, 
10:00 a.«i. EASTERN SHORE, 
VIRGINIA, LociUed throughout 
Accomac County and 2 in Nor- 
thampton County. These 
properties wiU be available for 
immediate possession, since title 
a held by and the sale is being 
a>nducted for Farmers Home 
Administration. DwetUng sizes 
vary from SOOto 1100 sq. ft. 
Lot lijBa vmty from 15,000 to 
20,000 iq. ft. Condition varies 
from some houses ready for oc- 
cupancy to some in need of com- 
pleU remodeling. Estimated 
Values range from $5,000 to 
$20,000. All properties include 
separate wells and septic systems 
and ar« located on paved state 
roads. ATTENTION! HOME 
OWNERS - INVESTORS - 
CONTRACTORS - HAN- 
DYMEN - HOLDERS OF 
RENTAL PROPERTIES. Sale 
Location: Eastern Shore Com- 
munity CoUege Lecture Hall, 
Mdfa, Virginia. TERMS: lOVs 
DqiXMif Sale Day in Cash or 
Certifled Funds, Balance in Cash 
at Closing within 30 days or 
Terms Available for applicants 
applying prior to sale day. All 
Sales Subject to Immediate Con- 
firmation by Farmers Home 
Administration. For Detailed 
Brochures Including Individoal 
Photographs and Exact 

Locations, CONTACT 

OWNBY AUCTION & 
REALTY CO.. INC. 1301 Her- 
mitage Rd., Richmond. Va. 
Telephone 804-358-8493 (An 
Equal Housing Opportunity) 

3iS-3T-ll/17 



37, Late Far Salt 



40. Saivicas 



HOUSE TO SHARE in 

Chtsapeake. $150 a month plus 
M utilities. Non-smoker 
prefored. 488-5895 

344T11-I7 



« SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE §J 

~ FIREPLACES ' 

CUSTOM BUILT 

'fall special, for SAFETY'S SAKE^ 

FREE ESTIMATE & INSPECTION | 



li 




340-7219 

Ocean Builders 



>^Repair E^unpa-s, Cracked Firebrfek, Cracks m 
Aiuj Chimney C^» % 

SAVE &4VI SAVE SAVE SMK lAVK tAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE UVE SAVE SAVE ^ 



40« SaFvlcas 



■CmKKEEPER - WUI do botoks* 
in my home. Experienced', in 
payrool and quarteriy returns. 
Pick-up and deHvery servfce. 
Call 545-4096 aftw 5 pm. Vor 
more information and rates. 

4EITFN 

SPECIALIZING IN TRBPS to 

airport or driving elderly to shop 
and do errands. CaU 497-4794. 
40 4T 11- 17 

TYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Selectric. 
Reasonable rates. CaU either 
4^7-7112, Kem]i>sville area, or 
463-0236, HiUtop/Pembrcrice - 
ea. 

4014. 



41. Carpantry 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING, 
ROOFING - and aU types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 420-8453. 

41 TFN 



TVPING-AU kinds, resumes, 
term papers, 10 yean experience. 
Reasonable Rates I Upon 
request, 7 days a week. CaU 545- 
0607. 

40-4T-11/24 



PLUMBING-Personalized ser- 
vice, reasonable rates. AD type 
repairs, installations, 
remodeling, addirions, win- 
tmziiig. Special rates on drain 
cteaning. Free estimates. AU 
work piaranteed, quality wwk. 
QUI 497-0574, day or night. 
Emeri^ency service. PAUL 
DAVIS PLUMBING. Licensed. 
40-4T-11/24 



42.CliiMCara 



VIRGINIA BEACH-Cape Story 
by the Sea. $29,900. By owner. 
Call 215-'?5i-1876 for more in- 
formation. 

37-4T-11/24 

I 39. Praf at^kaaal Sarvicaa I 



mCOME TAX - and Accoun- 
tiof including tax audiu). Mario 
Veiaditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virgiiiia Beach Blvd. (near 
liosemont Rd.) CaU 463-4608. 
38 13T 1-12 

BOOKKEEPlNG-MoBthly ' 

balinccshcet, PAL. detaUed 
trial balance from your checks 
aad receipts, stubs, or register 
tapes. 941's and VA-5's. Up 
to 200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; '45. Payables, 
receivable, small payroll. 
Chesapeake only. CaU 420- 
6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKING SERVICE -induding' 
quarterly payroU reports and 
bank account reconciliation. 
Specializing in smaU proprdtor- 
ships. Pick up and delivery. 
Retired professional. CaU 420- 
5^4. 

39TFN 



46. Firaplaca* 



47. Haaia lavravamant 



STOPUVINGINFEAS 

Complete Dc^ Traininc: 3 mon- 
ths to 3 yean. Liceaied from 
burgat K-9 Corp. in the nation. 
CaU 804-481-6999. 

48TTN 



CHILDCARE • My home, fen- 
ced yard, meals. Ages 3 months 
to 2 years old. CaU 420-7996. 

42-lT-ll/lO 

CHILDCARE - My Aragona 
home. WiU care for ages 3 and 
up. Monday thru Friday. CaU 
499-4988. 

42-lT-ll/lO 

CHILDCARE - My South Nor- 
folk home, Monday thru Friday. 
wiU serve snacks and meals. Lots 
of toys and playmates. 
Reasonable rates. Call 543-4020. 
' 42-4T-12/I 

CHILDCARE - My home, 
anytime, drop-in's welcome, wiU 
serve snacks and meals. 
Reasonable rates. CaU 480-4614. 
42 4T 11-17 

CHILDCARE-My Virginia 
Beach home, fenced yard, 
playmates. wiU serve snacks and 
meals. WiU sit any time. Call 
340-2225. 

42-4T- 11/24 



WE DO ALL types ceramic tile 

work and aU types of home im- 

provonents. Free estimates. 

490-9102. 

47-4T-11/10 

E. J. SIDING - Specialists in 
vinyl & aluminum siding, storm 
doors, windows & guttering. 
Experienced mechanics. I^ee 
estimates - low prices. CaU 499- 
1391 or 543-7737. 

47-4T-11/10 

ADDITIONS.,, ROOMS- 

carpentry, rooffng, siding, 
storm window, storm doon, 
plast^ng, electric, concrete 
work, plumbing, guttering, 
remodeling, kitchen and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluminum siding, Hrplaces, 
carpeting painting, specializing 
in parking areas and driveways, 
aU type of demoUtion, free 
estimate without obligM'on, 
prompt service. Serving aU of 
ndeirater. Bonded and In- 
sured, Sute Registo-ed. CaU 
625-7435. 623-6148. or 499- 
5516. 
47-Tiy 

ADDITIONS - Rooms, girages, 
.convert garages, decks, etc. 
Quality work by a licensed 
builder. Free estimates. Call 340- 
2511 anytime. 

47 TFN 



51. Paiatii^K 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAINTING-Fast and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 
51 TFN 

PAINTING • Large or small 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and Ught carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



S5. Ramadalnf/DacaraffRf 



BATHROOM REMODEUNG - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 years experience in 
Tidewater area. SmaU and large 
jobs, Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

55 ■^FN 



60. 



TIRE AND RIM - F78-14, new, 
never used. S30. Call 543-0205 or 
425-0722. 

604T 11-17 



CHESAPEAKE MEMORIAL 

Gardeiu. Four grave sites in 
Garden of the Word and 36 x 
13" bronze marker. Only $1,595. 
CaU 545-0226. 

604TU-17 



FIREPLACES - Custom bulk. 
Also repairs on dampers, 
firebricks, cracks, etc. 340-7219 
anytime. 
46 4T 11-10 

FIREPLACES - Custom buih, 
also repairs on damper fire 
bricks, cracks, etc. CaU 340- 
7219 anytime. 

4^T-11/10 




A great Mm nuMle 
evMi better. 

An excellent value for 
your heating doitar. With 
an amazkig serif ctoan- 
ing porous ceramte wick 
that bums clean, bright, 
hot. Pu^-button start- 
irig.UL listed. Plus... 
fuel efficiency ttiat 
delivers clean, oom-^ 
fortable heat for just 
pennies an hour. 
Reg. '282." 

NOW *229" 

Industrial Hardware 
And SuppI) 

(Weniz) 

4217 Bainliridgc BIsU. 
Chesapiake 543-2232 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 
^)«ria]ists 
•Buikiing Cc»trtcajr«Roof5»CarportsKjarates 
•Bath RCTK}dded«Room ^Iditioos 
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V 



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^^mmmmm^^^^^rmmmmi^n^fmmm^nmvmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, November 10, 1982 





Collector *s Edition 

First Corvette 
With Hatchback 



Corvette To Covet 



The "Collector E<fition'* is an added diligence 
of ^^pi nut additioital t|jre t«:hnoi<%y. 

UaiQue silver-brage metaBk paint, pin stripes 
and fadisg sIukIow treatment on the hood, fenders 
ai^ do<»s distinguish the 1982 Collector Edition 
Corvette Hatchback Coupe. 

From its distinctive cloisonne emblems to its 
sp^flc whMls and hubs and on through its special 
Vehkte Id«ntificattOB Numbers (to help prevent 
s^tieone Crom building a sumdm^d model into a 
OBJIectcM" Bdition), ^Sm is tl»Corvettc to covet. 

The Corvette engineering team established 
to^ standards for the P255/«)R-15 SBR tires, in 
terms of performance characteristics, and 
Goodyear responded with a set of rais^, white- 
tetteroi Eagle GT tires, standard only on the 
O^BedorEcMtion. 

As »ioth«- plus, removable glass roof panels 
with special bron» c»Ior and solar screening allow 
<Hi to take full enjoyment from a sunny driving 
dtoadon. Rear window defogg^ and ^wer aa- 
toinaareswadard. 

The CdOm^m Edition b a brilliant blemi of 
SqpiUtekiMed design and advanced engineering, a 
ctmiWmition that promises the kind of roadability 
you*ve come to expect of Corvette and m unex- 
cdted sense of style. 



This is an enthusiast's kind of Corvette, a most 
civilized one. StiU it's a 'Vette with the sassy- 
souled gusto of its predessotrs. 

This is till the roAd-wise sports car that's always 
been capable of inhaijng great chunks of 2'lane 
tarmac and leaving you n^arated even after a 
long ride. It's stiU the time and space machine en- 
thusiasts aspire to. 

There's a new civility now, 
however—predicated in large part on two 
engineering advances: Cross-Fire Injection and a 
4-speed automatic transmission vrith overdrive 
fourth gear. 

There's also a space age standard of flt and 
finish that is rigidl^ imposed and then carefuUy 
checked by inspectors at a new 1 -miUion-square- 
foot plant in Bowling Green Kentucky. 

That's Tlie Beauty of Corvettcr ownership. 

Satisfying in creature comfort, yet precision- 
built to flatten str^htaways and glue down the 
w>mers. 

You can purchase the I9S2 Collector's Edition 
Corvette for just $99 over dealer cost a( ^K 
Chevrolet. 





i . (■.'.•< I, 



^■■■i 



■■■I 



The Collector Edition 
interior— a driving en- 
vironment that offers 
practical flourishes and 
considerate touches not 
always found in a 2-seater 
that is— frankly— still a 
rather spiffy hunk of road 
machinery. 

And, now in the Collec- 
tor Edition, a Corvette is 
available for the first time 
with a newly designed, 
fully lifting, frameless 
glass hatchback with 
remote release. 

Inside? Matching 

RK 

Sales Agent 
Of The 
Months ' 



RK Chevrolet would 
like to acknowlege and 
congratulate Willie Smith 
as Sales Agent of the 
Month for October. 

Willie has . been 
associated with RK 
Chevrolet for over three 



silver-beige metallic in- 
terior with multi-tone 
leather seats and door 
trim. Standard, too, on 
the 1982 Collector Edition 
are the upgraded carpeting 
throughout and the 
theme-color, hand-sewn, 

leather-wrapped steering 
that surrounds the leather- 
covered horn button 
which is surmounted by a 
cloissonne emblem. All 
this is framed by the 
deeply muted, dark beige 

console and instrument 
cluster trim plates. 




iind'trip ticket for 2-Eafltcrn AirilMt ' 
^ * oiiMd4ri|t ticket for two aiiy whm EMtcn Aiifln« tUm hi 
ilM U.S., OMMia, Mnko, Bcraudi, Um Bulramn or Curil»> 
iNnsIifamh. 

Utc it jvmuM, or give •» ■ t>f< wlum jrott t«lce driVvrry of 
jwt MsiectMl new Ckcrrolet. 

TIM iMnrt-Ulp dk^ket for two €•■ M wed until Not. IS, IM3 
fMrtaialMMay travel rntrictioM tif^). Yon amt kmy or or* 
Ar «M ot th«e new IM3 or '12 Chcvroleli ky Nov. 15, 1M2; 
GiMnretIt, CStaSon, simdwd (wo-wlicci-4rivc S-l» rkkap. 
m-itm CIO ndwp or LUV TnKk. Pnrtidpirtlng dcnlwi eon- 
ttfitatc'lTStothkprogfUi. TUinty »f feci y««r vehicle 4 
«o Md» yow ixMI <!«•>• Of fcr eppilce to relaH Milei only. 



10.9% 




years and was Sales Agent 
of the Year in 1981. Willie 
would like to invite all his 
friends and associates to 
visit him at RK Chevrolet 
and would appreciate the 
opportunity to assist them 
with their transportation 
needs. 



-2: j;!tew low mi«mi[-nue: 
! oidy on new 1911 CicvroW can or ilgHt'darr ^ 
t> .mpsred to national •vers< 

«:-.- , - lean savings to qaaUned t_. 

(irwdif of dolkn ID flnandnt eitarges. Dealer eOntribDti< 
fiiumdog may affect consumer cost. Savings will vary '■ 
amotttt flnitKed. duration of loan and state law. Does noti 
apply to leases, fleet laies or LUV Trucics. 



HUl^Y. BUY B£FORE NOV. 15 
TO GET BOTH OFFERS. 

During Sale^ Yott Can Pnrcluse 

A 1982 Corvette For J^ 

S99 oyer dealer cmi at R] 



CHmotHMalmmm Cat 



trnntwvan Mikity. 
•« V* aMKk ««A 




4«6-2222 



Owy 0^ 




End of Season ^^ 

CLOSEOUT 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES 




We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

buying a convertible 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 



$iooo 

BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 




w HRnPiij^ 



y^^ 




3443 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 



463^100 



Get the Great Pair to stop wear. 

Motorcraft Oil and Oil Filter. 



% 




SUPER SIX 
PACK SALE: 

5 quarts of Motorcraft Supw Premium Motor Oil 



and One FL-1 A Filter For Only 



2717 Virginia Beach Blvd. 



*7.70 include $3.50 rebate 
AQfi 5717 from Motorcraft 

•♦00-Z / 1 / EXPIRES 1 1-30-82 



n. 



70 



(regularly »17.00) 




KIMNACH FORD 

TRUCK SALE 



SAVE 

*500-*2000 



1982 OR 1983 

F-SERIES 
RANGER 
BRONCO 

VANS 

KIMNACH FORD 

6401 E. Virginia Beach Blvd 

(Josl Off NcwtowB Rd. Exit) 

461-6401 



GET OUR LOW CHEVY 
PRICE AND OUR HIGH- 
FLYING OFFER NOW... 
A ROUND-TRIP TICKET 
FOR TWO ON 
EASTERN AIRLINES 



You've never seen an offer like this before! Just 
buy or order a new Chevy Chevette, Citation, or 
selected new S-10, CIO cm- LUV truck before 
November 15, 1982, and we'll give you a roun- 
dtrip ticket for two on Eastern Airlines. Choose 
one of 116 cities in the U.S.A., Canada, Mexico, 
Bermuda, the Bahamas aixi the Caribbean. Come 
in soon and get all the detatti. 

Particiimting dealers cmitribute $175 to this 
program. This may affect your vehicle cost, so 
make yoiu- best deal . 



KLINE 
CHEVROLET 

S. MILITARY HWY. 
A GREENBRIER RD. 




A NEW KIND OF CADILLAC COMES TO LIFE.. 

WITH A SMOOTH NEW 5-SPEED... 
RESPONSIVE NEW 2.0 LITER ENGINE... 

AND CADILLAC'S ROAD-HUGGING 

TOURING SUSPENSION. 

PUT ON YOUR DRIVING GLOVE FOR 

CIMARRON '83! 



THINK 



ffilnic SavlngB 
ThkA Smrvlcm 



M Bamwr BuMc 
Bannt Bvicfc 
^ Btmnt B^Mi 





wstb ^ Rffltary Cbde 

424-1811 



i 



5524 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Va.B^h,Va. 490-0531 





1900 



aKYuum 



*1632 




19U 



jtmiiw »7228 



THINK 



Banner^^^^ 



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WIU. 

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f26 916475 03/17/84 



VIRGINIA. 

SFRIAl 

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^ "ovn^^'W''" 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

5«h Year, No. 46, Vlgrfnto Bewh. V«. ^V.iii^*'^"**"*™*^***^^^??^!!^?^'^^"^^"™""*^^'^^'*™'""**^*'^^ 




fA' 




Virginia Beach fire investigator M. W. Wade, witii cup, expects tlie investigation to continue for some 
time. 



- The Hotel Was Old 



Investigation To Proceed 
On Ivanhoe's Firey Demise 



"Wi presume UX.0 »xkkmt, " uM VIrgitria 
Baudt Fire De piamm t investigator M. W. Wade, 
about last weekend's firey destruction of the 
Ivankoe Motel, located at 2 1st Street and A tlantic 
Avenue. 

Flames were first noticed at the motel last Sun- 
day night at 8:43 p.m. and roared for more than 
three hours before the efforts of 100 flr^ghters, 
and 18 pieces of firefighting equipment including 
six engine companies were e^ntually called in to 
snuff the fire. 



Hgnpots were stl^yUgn^m^bi04h0 S0n^i0 m, 
investmiorssume)^ the d<msm> searching for 
the cause of the fire. TheouUding was built 
sometime around 1920, Wade said, and did not 
have any fire proofing between floors or in the 
walls. Wade expects to determine the extxt origin 
of the fire by the end of the week but expects the 
investigation to continue for sonMime. He said a 
similar fire erupted three years ago Just a few 
doors down at the Atlantk Motfl. 




The Ivanhoe bamcd for more than three hoare 




Officers "Unnerved" 



Cop Attacks Under Attack 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 
Although the Virginia Beadi Pdice Department, 
working with the FBI, announced Monday the arrest of 
Larry Nathan Gay in connection with the recent 
shooting of 2nd Precinct Lieutenant Dennis Watson, a 
host of questions surrounding the incident remain 
unanswered. For example: 

•What is the mood of the approximately 400 
unifcM^med pdice officers fdlowing the shooting? 

•Why is it necessary that pdicemen mocmlight to 
supplement their incomes, just like Watsrai was doing 
at the Naval Air NorfWc Federal Gcdit Union ai 
Mustang Trail the day he was shot? 

•What can be done to curb the increasing trend of 
assault on police officers? 

The events leading up to the shooting, briefly, 
transpired as follows. 

At 4:20 p.m. on Tuesday, I^ov. 9, Watsai was 
working as a part-time security officer for the Londcxi 
Bridge Credit Union when he was approached by the 
assailant. According to repo-ts, a scuffle ensued and 
the man was able, apparently, to take Watsai's gun 
from him. With Watson beside him, the robber handed 



a bag to a cashier, who put moiey in it. Then, according 
to one eyewitness, the man shot Watson tlirough the 
cheek, said, "You deserve that," and fled. 

Watson, a 16-year veteran of the police department, 
is married and the fether of two sons, ages 11 and 14. 
The 38 year-old pdiceman was tal«n to Virginia Beach 
General Hospital where he underwent surgery to stop 
the bleeding immediately after the shooting. Recon- 
structive surgery on his jaw and face were performed 
later in the week. Watson's outlook "is very good" said 
Capt. E. F. Buzzy, an administrative assistant to Chief 
Charles Wall. "When I talked to him on Friday, he was 
progressing." 

"Tlie men I've talked to, the pciice out in the streets, 
are unnerved," said Sgt. Danny Kappers of the Qime 
Prevention Unit of the Virginia Beach Police Depart- 
ment. "What they are starting to realize is that we are 
not living in a tiny seap«t city where artists paint 
pictures on the weekend. They are coming to find that 
this is a dangerous place and is getting worse all the 
time." Said Detective Michael Derwent of the Crime 
Sdvers Bureau: "When a shooting like this han>ens, it 
hits home with every officer. It makes him realize, 'It 
could be me next time.'" 

See WHAT, Page 13 



1^ 



Teachers Must Demand 

ts To Write Well 




%^'-%.-^i 



tmuAm of Tte Ivanhoe Motel 



ivi tOMi-oiMK aiuu%r' 




m Bu 

veir$lties a-^ 'R place more emptor; 

exposito^r «,*u ..,^*.«.«. writir** *'"' ''«*»ft«-»«n- 
of wrrtmg $» m commonicalion 

F alJac. tso beui* rcAiii^. 

'StftdhMte^Wtt oiore career oriented no-. 
[ and have a good uoderstaiKllat <^ what c 
""'"" *'•* demand,** s«i^ (^ote Hiah 
jvaaonl pbk 

empoosui: 
irtKtobeh*'' 



H«tatm)itutot«a4 

ever wrote outside of the < 
when students were made to write they did not 
perform to their best ability and o/teatk^ tost i^ 
tere«t in writing, Lambrida. howevor, tan^ her 
a keener appreciation of the fine art of writing. 

Pages Of Student Creative Writing 

Rages 10-12. 1< 




,id Heidi JUMCI9VI, I'UMi freshmen 

Univeraity, Norfolk, were both 

:\jtKxnet« students '. note's last 

us. fecqited into u.v ...n^it^nal student 

atfittk society, "QulU and Scroll." 

to copy editor of her achool** yearbook. 

- -' -advanced placem*^* *** history, 

art, and pby»c? iS also 

7l's literary magazine "Yawp," 

, *„„„f of the yearbook. But it wa^; 

i who influenced her writing the n 

y best experience with writhig white 1 was IP. 

ua^ viLifh Mr Lambriola." BeiscK the 

iilull' -^ Beise' ' 

gave hini mote Wood and sweat tiian anyone vise. 



mriukiyj 



"Writing is an exercise," she said. "It sharpens 
the mind. Like running, it's an effort but you 
build your body and feel better afterwards. 

"Creative writing, however, should not be a 
part of everyone's life," she continued. "If you 
absolutely hate it you shouldn't do it. But the way 
the schools are set up, the students have to." 

As editor of "Yawp," Beisel, who hasn't yet 
chosen a major at ODli, said most of the student 
who contributed creative writing to the magaziiM! 
centered on the themra of "tow, ^m^,mA mm- 
shine." She said the nsaaom tta« ttenes seemed 
limited was because tte stt^loitii w«e adted til 
perform on command. 

"The writing is fon»i," she s«d. *Tte«wl«B- 
ts ask themselves, 'what simM I wlte tbmtV 
They look around ai^ adc ^mM^m ni^ ^ 
great writers wrote about. Ita^ mt lamm Uke 
Howers and joy. They figure th^'D write abo^ 
that and get an A." 

Bdsei said that while she w»editOTk lwo4hh^ 
of the material contributed to tt» wwyr f fwe Tor in- 
clusiOQ were from averi^ w r^n^M «d^. 
(My ten to fifteen pen^tt of tte ooMiflvted 
matertal gm on to the iH^es tm iM^^tiott, but 

S«WRlTIfW,P»ae3 



ByLeeCahill 



Gaston Chosen: $185 M 



Virginia Beach City 
Council has selected Lake 
Gaston as its water sou- 
rce. The estimtted cost 
will be $183 miUion. 

With unaniuMUS a''op»- 
ion of a resdution Moi- 
day afternoon, the dty 
administration ami staff 
were authoriKd "to XKCC- 
ecA immediately to proc- 
ure necessary permits 
from the U.S. Oari» <rf 
Engineers a^ to enter 
contracts for legal, engin- 
eering and consulting ser- 
vices necessary to coni|d- 
eie the pro^ct in a timely 
manner." Tl« wte was 
10-0. Councilman Dr. J. 



Henry McCoy Jr. was 
absent. 

The decision ended five 
years of searching, invest- 
igations and experiment- 
ation invdving iA alterna- 
tives to provi(te a water 
source for N^rignia Beach. 

Qty Manager Thomas 
H. Muehlenbeck said 
Monday that tlw dty on 
no Icmger ftiUy pursue all 
(rf the alttrnatives be- 
cause of fii^ncial rescMr- 
ces, stafB^ moA tisK 
restraints. Tlw dty exp- 
els to have the system in 
place by the 1990's. ks20 
^ar contract with the Qty 
<tf Norfolk expires in 1^3. 



The recommendation 
was m^le in a report 
released Monday on the 
Water Resource Dcvel- 
ofHnem n-(%ram. 



The options had been 
narrowed down to three- 
withdrawal from Lake Ga- 
ston, the construction of 
See LAKE. Fife 3 



Lynnhaven Beach 
Down On Abuse 



Resutotts m the am of 
Lynnhaven Bndi want to 
CTwk down (M the abuse 
of tlK b«ich 1^ people, 
tlMy maiittain, «Ao are 
1^ resiiteu of Virginia 
Beach. 



To aocont^A tte they 
are wUu^ to eqwnd or- 
dinances whteh will 
relict aU bm/A^gaen. As 
Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech ubmI^MxkI tte «-• 
SeeOC»Ln>CIL.P«eS 



a^^^^^^^ta 



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mam 



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2 Virginia Beach Sun, Novonbo^ 17, 1982 



Sun Comimntary 



...JL|U. iil|pilP*WP^i Jlill.M 



Editorials 



Reverse Police Brutality 



The Dennis Watson story is yet another 
chapter in a tragic novel being written in 
the streets of Virginia Beach. 

The ink for this woebegone tale is 
blood-red, shed by three Virginia Beach 
police officers, shot while wearing their 
uniforms. In the past eleven months, 
three cops have been wounded by gun- 
toting thugs. 

Officer Sandy Buttrey was grazed in the 
head last July by the bullet from a .38 
caliber handgun. She lived, and was 
recently awarded the department's Silver 
Cross and Blue Star awards. Watson, like 
Buttrey, is expected to recover following a 
lengthy reconstruction of his jaw and 
face. A third policeman, Daniel Maloney, 
was not so fortunate. He died as a result 
of injuries suffered in the line of duty. 

What all of this underscores is a basic 
lack of respect for authority. Common- 
wealth's Attorney Paul Sciortino says 
these sorts of crimes should be punished 
to the full extent of the law. "To me, 
anyone who shoots a police officer is just 
lashing out at society, saying, 'I don't 
have to conform to society's rules,'" he 
said. "My opinion is that when you take 
on a police ofHcer, and you know he is a 
police officer, it is the same thing as 



taking on the state. There should be no 
misdemeanors here. There should be 
mandatory penitentiary time." 

Assaults on police officers are in- 
creasing every year. In 1979, there were 93 
recorded cases; in 1980, 120. Last year, 
the figure jumped to 157. What can be 
done to stem this tide? Law enforcement 
officials and state legislators alike seem 
stumped. Most feel as though the laws on 
the books protected Watson and the 
others as best as could be expected. 

Still, one has to fear for himself and for 
society when a policeman is shot. If a 
recognized law enforcement agent is un- 
safe from criminal assualt, what does that 
say about the safety of law abiding 
citizens? 

So, perhaps it is as Sciortino reasons, 
that there is nothing we could have done 
to prevent the shooting of Lt. Watson. 
"Some of these people are like mad dogs 
on the loose," he says. 

At the very least, we can hope that the 
city takes one "mad dog," Larry Nathan 
Gay, the man charged with shooting Wat- 
son, locks him in the pound and throws 
away the key. While that may not restore 
Watson's face, it seems to be the closest 
thing to justice we can extract. — M.M.G. 



- *****.■ *-^*.t-^fr'* ■! iWflBBF •»*!*** 



Going on all around us is a literal ex- 
plosion of the cultural arts. 

In Hve short years, the number of arts 
groups in the Tidewater area has nearly 
doubled. Everywhere one looks there is 
drama, music and art freely flowing. Such 
events as the Neptune Festival, the annual 
Shakespeare-by-the Sea series, and the 
Boardwalk Art Show have made Virginia 
Beach a most entertaining place in which 
to reside. Additionally, one can enjoy the 
opera, symphony, or ballet in neighboring 
cities as well as here in town. 

Industries are very cognizant of the im- 
pact such cultural imenities can have on 
employe productivity. If a worker is 
happy in his surroundings, his attitude 
toward his work is bound to improve, 
they reason. City governments, constantly 
on the lookout for ways in which to in- 
crease the tax base, are aware that strong 
cultural arts can attract more industries, 
and hence, generate more tax revenues. 

Thus, the Greater Hampton Roads 
Cultural Action Plan was born. Some 120 
influential leaders from all over the Ham- 
pton Roads vicinity have joined forces to 
organize, promote, and hopefully, to im- 
prove the region's arts. The ambitious 
seven month plan calls for identification 
of improved publicity techniques, and 
implementation of the same. By in- 
creasing the public's awareness of the ar- 
ts, increased revenues for the various arts 



Arts Explosion 



organizations should ensue. 

There are those in the community with 
reservations about the plan. These critics 
say they have seen such plans come and 
go before, yielding few iangibte results. 
Understandably, they are leary of suppor- 
ting any newfangled attempts to boost the 
arts. "Generally speaking," say Ed Hurd, 
president of the Little Theater of Virginia 
Beach, "anyone who comes into town 
and says he's going to save the arts is 
really just trying to make a star of him- 
self." 

Still, we are dealing here with a very 
credible cast of characters. Heading the 
list of those involved in the project is Dr. 
Clarence Holland, the former nu^or of 
Virginia Beach. Joining him are such 
pillars of conmiunity stroigth as Council- 
woman Nancy Crocch, ODU President 
Alfred B. Rollins, Jr., Virginia Wesleyan 
President Lambuth Clarke, and Land- 
mark Communications chairman of the 
Board Frank Batten. 

It would seem that Tidewater has long 
needed a comprehensive cultural arts 
organization that would encorporate all 
the different localities. As Frederick Sch- 
mid, director of the Virginia Beiu;h Arts 
Center says, "Nobody is guaranteeing the 
final results on the plan. I don't have a 
crystal ball. But, we at Irast owe it to our- 
selves to give it a chance. — M.M.G. 



Boxing Once Again 



Virginia Beach boxing promoter 
Stanley Bennett wants to take another jab 
at it, but this time he do«n't want to hold 
the pTofmsifuai boxing matches at the 
Pavilion but at a wdl known Virginia 
BemA id^tclub. 

The dub's cmna- also wants tl» b<»cing 



but has to first negotiate with the 
AlochoUc Bevotige Control hoard m 
Richmoiul to see if he can get pomisdon 
to present bosdi^ without fear of l(^ag 
his aloclM>lk bev^a^ Ik^ise. Nightdute 
are imK siqipMed to host activities mh^e 
n^ or womm*i d^sts are exposed. More 
iKxt week. G.D.Q. 



Letters To The Editor 



Heart Lung Bill Article Draws Reaction 



Editor: 

Conc«ning your article <mii the Heart Lung Bill, 
Delegate McClanan's astute obsovation that, "There 
are many stressful jobs in Virginia Beach," is one of his 
typical pearls of wisdom. As for Mayor Jones' remark 
that, "Nobody gets everytUng he wants," I would like 
to say, how true! The citizens of Virginia Beach wound 
up with a first term undertaker as its mayor. 

Mr. Robert Jones stated, "I am for any benefit our 
firefighters and poli^men are entitled to, but right now 



we are makii^ the paymoits fot what the state thinks is 
good." Obviously he seems to think that if the state 
paid the freight on the Heart Lung Bill, it would be all 
right because our firemen and cops deserve it, but since 
the Oty is called upon to pay the bill, it is not necessary. 
Thank God for the greater majority of our state 
legislators, since Virginia Beach has historically treated 
its public servants like second dass dtizens. 

Carol M. Kappers, 
Virginia fiieach 



Gun Control 



Editor: 

For well ovo' a decade the SO million gun ownos of 
tiie United States and the National Rifle Association 
have been assailed by the advocates of gun control with 
the aocusiUion that we have been insensitive to the tragic 
loss of human Ufe. 

During that period we have seen this group with smug 
self*rightecNi4M8S assume postures within which no 
point of exanenition, calumny, defamaticm or even 
slando- was beneath than. 

However, the overwhdming defeat of California's 
handgun "freeze" initiative as reported in the 
Washington Post, Tuesday, Nov. 9, displays the gun 
prohibitionists' cynical disregard of human life for pur- 
poses of political «ipediency. In tiie final sentence of the 



article Michael Beard, Executive Director of the 
National Coalition to ten Handguns stated, "I hate to 
say it, but one wdl-{»ibUcized homicide could wipe 
that/California vote/ out. " 

Imagine an individiuil of supposed intelligence 
praying for the death of some prominent American so 
that his own selfish, misguided cause might be advan- 
ced. 

Hiis from an organization that trumpets from any 
available podium and through any available medium 
tiidr slogan, 'To save om life." What hypocrisy! 

J. Warren Ousidy, 

Executive Director, 

NRA Institute for 

Legislative Action 



Let The People Talk 



Editor: 

Why is it that whenever somebody in government 
has a good idea, it always seems to fall on deaf ears? 
Two recent examples come to mind. One is the notion of 
directly electing the city's mayor. The other (me is the 
idea of direcUy electing the school bcnrd. 

This is America, a democracy. I was taught that here 



we (grated under the one-man, one-vote philosophy. 
While the government leaders we have here seem to be 
very good, would it not be wiser to let tiie people have a 
say-so in who runs the city? 

AnaUiom Hiimasome 
Wginia Beach 








•i^t^tis *,rii iii /t'j-iUtir --f-ij *^ui 



Jewish Literature 



Library 
SUHIInef 




Worid literature would be far poorer without tiie 
work of Jewish uithors and their insights into the 
human condition. Writers like Singer, Potok, and 
Pasternak have transcended cultural torriers to toudi 
readers of all Mhs. Muiy diildren's boda about the 
en^t^mx of being Jewish also have this univenality 
and on broetkn tine reader's cultural awareness and 
develop his or her empathy for others. 

l>vo delightflil stones ai Jewish fiamily life in the 
early ^ars of this century are "The Carp m the 
Bathtub" by Barbara Cdien and Sydney Taylor's 
"AU-of-a-Kind Family." The carp is sunxwed to be 
turned into gefilte fish but Harry and Leah, the children 
in the fiunily, ve determined to save this fish. AU five 
<tf the (Mdren in Taylor's fianuly are giils. In the course 
of their adventures they celebrate Purim, Passover, 
SuMOB, and at last, the birth of a baby brother. 

Otter authors have turned to the experiences of their 
chiMho«<» during the Depression. Marilyn Sachs' 
"Peter and Venioka" have nothing in common. She's 
the biggest seventh grader and he's tiie smallest. He's 
Jewish and sbt isn't. But Verooka risls ti» wntth of 
Iwr fiusdfy to stay Peter's frieiKl and intend his Bar 
Mitz\«h. In "Stao^ing &lfy J. Freedman As Herself 
Judy Blunte tells ci l»r dukfliood v»»itions at the 
beach ami Iter imaginative unUtkxu. For a more 
^xtA story, E. L. Koo^bu^ teUs abo^ an important 
year £or Mark Set»r wlK»e mo^r numages hb Uttie 
iMgue team in "About tlte B'nu &igels." 

FoUtore provittes a dififerem afptfmA for some 
aOhon. "The Htsasure" by ^uleviu is the subject <rf 
kMc's dream. As he scarves for the promised wealth 
Mi meets soote oae wto has ignored ha own d^eam. 
tte RabM's adtnee m Zemadi's "ft QmU Ahrayi Be 
Wo^" iMM Utavfaa cooseiptenMs and teadtes a 
<MtaaUe tetson abcM eontentme^. Beverly Brodsky 



McDermott has chosen a darker legend to illustrate. 
Her brooding portrayal of "The Ooiem" created to save 
the Jews of Prague is a moving symbol of the 
temptation to fight terror with terror. 

(Met readers may wish to understand the effects of 
World War n and the Hdocaust on Jewish uithors. 
Bette Green's "Summer (tf My German Soldier" tells 
of an Amoican Jewidi girl's divided loyalities and 
conflicting emotions, ft dot$ not permit the sfanple roles 
of hero and villain bttt fivoes the reader deeper. The 
saute is true oS "Tlte Last Mission" by Harry Mazer. A 
sixteen-year-oU ynho runs dS to war finds not the glory 
of destroying Hftler as he hwl fentasized but the painful 
loss of his own innocence. Anne Frank's "Dury ot a 
Young CMrl" is fiusfliar to almost everyoite, bitt it is 
worth restating that what makes her stoiy so nuiving is 
not horror but Iter imderstaiuiing oi herself and all 
addetetmts. 

This year's Newbery Haaoi bock by Aranka Siegal 
captures a similar Tpiamt of Ufe continuing in tlte midst 
<tf the iiu»noeirabte. ft makes it possible for those of us 
bom since the war to underatand the minds of those 
who could not know vflm the ftiture Iwld. The reader 
becomes so involved in this Ivave fiamily's efforts to 
keep togetlter and maintain the traditions that assert 
their human dignity that when, at the end. the author's 
mother asks about their destination, Auschwitz, it 
seems impossible that they are going to die. Aranka 
Siegal was in Virginala Beadi for tlte Virginia library 
Convention and. while here, she autographed a copy a[ 
"Upon tiie Head (tf the Ooat." This book wiU be tiie 
prize in tl» Ubrartes' Jewish Bocrit Month Contest. 

The &mtt%t is open to all Virgniia Beach students 
between tte ages of 10 and 16. To enter, choose a book 
by a Jewbh autlMr and tell what its story is and why 
you recomntend ft. Use ooe sheet of p^ier; be sure to 
give the author and the titte d the bode, uid your 
uune, address, awl age. You may turn hi your entry at 
any Yttpmt Bea^ fuhUe Iftrary or nteil it to the 
ChiUren's Servtees Division, %12 South Plaa TVail, 
Virginia Beach, 23432. U you haw any questiou call 
340-2987. Jewish Bot* l^fkntii is November 10 to 
Oeitember 10. All entttes should be received by the 
tenth. Take this ommtui^totell otiters about a book 
you have eiyoyed. and ^m nuqf wta eae of the best . 
boda <tftte yew. 




0mmt^43» 



,Va.,»»2 



H^rialMnpMrAna 
Omltm-<9M 



All 
OmYmr-niM 



Lettors Welcome 

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<4M» Mv NvftM mam, mUmt tmi 
^^ mmtber, Mtf M^yy ^ TU 

MoMk n fgMa^Kfk VA, 23452. 



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Writing 

Standards 
Rising 

Continued from Page 1 
tnat figure also aUowed for a sizeable amount of 
student art to also be included. She would have 
liked to have been ^le to publish about thirty per- 
cent of the written material contributed. 

"The better stuff was written in private and on 
their own," Bdsel said, "not assigned. " 

Bdsel observed that more girls thwi guys wrote 
for the magazine, but whai tlw guys did write they 
wrote tons. 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 1 7, 1982 3 



»Af» 



t# 



(( 



'...writing pro- 
grams should be in- 
cluded in the schools 
...the administrators 
and teachers should 
be lauded for what 
they have now" - 
Beiset 




Befsel 

Bdsel is complimentary of the writing programs 
in the school system, but does note one area in 
which she feels there is room for improvement." 

"The only difference between teachers and 
students is age," She said. "Many teachers are 
unaware of the things going on today and they 
can't teach what they don't know. Teachers think 
there is only one way to interpret a poem. The in- 
terpretion must be carved in granite. Writing has 
to have more freedom in it; there are several levels 
of meaning . . . but despite my criticisms, 
writing programs should be included in the 
schools in the future. It's a very good program 
and the administrators and teachers should be 
lauded for what they have now. They should get 
an A for effort." , 



Blair, the daughter of Nfr. and Mrs. Alfred F. 
Blair, can't remember when she first began writing 
creatively, but recalls something her sister showed 
her that she said Blair wrote at the age of five. But 
it wasn't until she was an eighth grader at Lynn- 
haven Junior High School that she began to 
reiJize the process of writing. 

"Some things came very quickly to me," Blair, 
a finance major, said. "Other times it would take 
30 minutes to write five or six lines. I began to 
realize that writing was a process of refining. You 
don't do it all at one time. Yoii need to go back 
and read it." 

Blair always wrote very well In high school, ac- 
cording to her friends and teachers. She wrote for 
the school's literary magazine and has had a short 
story and poems published. 

Blair said the hard part of writing creatively is 
deciding what to write. Making it better, she says, 
"depends on your frame of mind." But Blair, like 
Beisel, agrees that writing teaches one how to 
think. 

"Writing is immensely important," she said. 
"It's one of the most important things you'll ever 
do in lugh school. Learning by rote is very 
useful . . . but it doesn't tmch you how to think 
or how to work." 

Blair had much more imagination, she says, 
when she was eight years old as «>mpared to now. 
Bat even today, when Blair does create picture 
with words, she gets a good feeling. 



"There ought to 
be more incentive 
for kids to write on 
their own... their 
work should be read 
by people other than 
teachers" - Blair 




BUr 

"If 1 like it I think I've done som^hing good," 
she said. "I'm a very discriminating reado- and I 
don't like much of what I r^. I like to write just 
to crttte son^ting. To slttre something with 
Knneone else uid say I created it. 

"If someone do«n't like to write," she cim- 
tinued, "I would tell than to r»d. The best 
r^son to write is to look at your i<feM. B^iUng 
with your fates te bound to be l^iefidal to you 
and to others that learn from your ideas." 

Uair 1^ 1^ i^u tot \m tsm^ve works 
Uvragh her p&tsefi&cok of life, couided with the 
abitt^ to respond to ttM which sl» (^teerves. 

"You haiw to s<»t of fonx the idns out . . . 
htse a ^ure in ywr nhul," ste said. "You have 
to fii^ out what Gua/eA it tni amla^ it. Your 
po^f^tion is tte source of your ktes. Writfng is 
intcraal but onised ^ eitemal tmem. Y(w 
lesfMMMl to i^yott see." 

Blair f^ thM many students today are 
MaMSt «U^ te says "brii^ wt a cstain 
d^rw^eretfv^.** 

Mt oftad^ ^e am tarnish tite cn^ve 
fiKulty in so^ piqpte. 




Cape Henry Woirien 
Hold Christmas 
In The Country 

The Cape Henry Women's Club of Virginia Beach 
will host its twentieth annual "Christmas in the Coun- 
try", Wed., Dec. 1 IB the home of Charles and Joyce 
Ehwkk of 1712 Hertford Way In Llnkhom Cov^c«^ 
oHht lMMBe*wdl)»e Irom tfta.^ to-S p Jiiiia^Mom ^ 
p.m. to 9 p.m. TIdtets, i^hiieh ys/b^ttbGilneD from a 
dob member, wlU be exchanged for a $1.50 donationl. 
Proceeds will go to the Cape ftenry Women 's'Club 
cdocatioul scholarship timtf. | f f 1 V 

Standby in front o|tl^^jlj|( bi^ttf are club mem- 
bers. Front roWftrom left to right: Betsy Etoxey, first 
vice president; Janice Conwli, second vice president; 
Dorothy Traub, presldeift; CarolCrouch, secretary; 
Swond row. Flora Dunham, publldty chairperson; 
Glenda Dw^htrey; Mary EUei^^qi Jessie Barnstead; 
Mami Kern; Thirti row: DoroW tmg\ Ebie Hatch; 
BobMe Blonnt; Ruth Webb; HdA Molloy; Fourth row: 
Sozanne CAi; Lanra S^^lnL^iinisident; Dora 
Tribbte; Frances Dozier;4K^#illl^^fflB; Evelyn 
WHUard. 




"We lose our ideals so esasity when we get 
older," she said. "That's a good reason to em- 
phasize creative writing.** 

For Blair, writing is "a hobby and a necessity." 

"It's an emotional release and a way to under- 
stand things,' «h^ continued. "If you read 
philosophy, for nample, you may not understand 
it until you write about it. You can't see the im- 
plication of what he's saying, but when you write 
about it, you run across different possibilities." 

Blair never titles her poems, and says she 
"doesn't make the connection between things for 
the reader," and consequently receives lower 
grades because of it, she says . 

Blair notes that people in junior high and high 
school tend to neglect poetry, and that 
"sometimes what is used is outdated." 

"If you can't see what's comii^ out of people's 
minds. now, I can't see how studying Socrates is 
going to help you." 

Blair beheves that modem d^y pMts di% neglec- 
ted in the schools, and attribdtes the absence to 
"teacters not really knowi^ how to teach it 
because it's new." 

Uair also fMls that studoitt should have m6re 
(9Portunity to display thdr miting in front of the 
public. 

"There ought to be more Incentive for kids to 
write on their own," she said, "and not just in the 
classroom. You see much art in the malls but there 
is no forum for students to be published. Their 
wrks should be read by p^ple other tlum the 
tau:h^. I've ^en people with a trraaendous 
amount of talent tiu-ned off to writing because no 
one recognize their talent in tintt.'* 



Virginia BoKh students partid^Ue in a variety 
of (?Mttve writt^ prt^imu a^ cw^ts in the 
Virginte B«Kh public wAocA syttMi throughout 
they»r. 

One of the mMt popular and successful 
IMtynflM, known as the Po« in the School 
pro^m ^rrS). aUows profosioiud po^s to visit 
IS veamkuy sdMx^ and Mtmd M ctassrooms 
ymu-ty. The prc^ram u in its A^th ^ar. At the 
end of eudi Khocri ytmc the viuti^ poeu sdect 



poem^ for inclusion in a student poetry anthology, 
of which, l.SOO copies are distributed. Plans are 
underway to include the PITS program next year 
at the elementary school level. 

Other writing programs in which the students 
partidpate indude the Virginia High School League 
Creative Writing Folder; the National Council of 
Teachers of English Achievement Awards Con- 
test; the Fleet Reserve National Essay Contest; 
and the Virginia High School League Literary 
Magazine Contest. 

Some junior high schools post student writing 
on classroom doors, a practice which has become 
very popular. 



"If we're going to teach writing well, 
all teachers in all disciplines must ask their 
students to write well" - Cox advanced 
placement English teacher Robert Lam- 
briola 

tBHHai^HHHBBBBBIil^^B^BB^IB 

Virginia Beach English t«ichers are encoura^ 
to attend the Virginia Writing Program, which 
giv» teachers an opportunity to keep abreast of 
the latest trends and technique in writing, thus 
enabling them to pas the knowledge on to the 
students. 

Even though some students have said that they 
thought more modem poetry should be taught in 
the schools, school adininistrators note that in the 
school system two different text books are used to 
balance the types of material studinl by students. 
"Thranes in Literature" deals with contemporary 
and classical literature, while "Responding," 
devotes 65 percoat of its material to works penn^ 
no earlier than \91S and up to the late 1970's. It is 
also noted that oil^^ still expect the educated 
student to have roKi a body of literature that is 
considered Clasical in nature. A third con- 
sideration on wtet is included in the En^ish 
curriculum is censorship, that meaning, parmts 
we sometime apt to be very critical of materials 
of which th^ are not familiar or that whidi may 
(»ntain ^s than the iwr«t of language. 

A com|»rison of 1981 and 1M2 national and 



Virginia Beach scores for advanced placement 
English students shows that Beach students score 
eight to ten percentile higher than the national 
average. 



The importance of writing as a communication 
skill is becoming increasingly imperative to the 
overall academic well being of Virginia Beach 
students. But students are not being pushed hard 
enough in other classes besides EngUsh for the 
student to make maximum use of the English 
language. 

Take math classes for example. 

"One of the greatest difficulties many math 
students have is with word problems, Lambriola 
said. "They may understand the formula for 
solving the problem but they do not understand 
the sentence structure which makes it more dif- 
ficult for them to identify exactly what the 
problem calls for." 

But Lambriola is confident that the academic 
community is making progress in accepting the 
importance of writing in all classes. 

"If I didn't feel that it was getting better 1 
couldn't get up and go to work every morning," 
he said. But he is also looking for more in- 
volvement from his colleagues in demanding bet- 
ter writing from the students. 

"When students take tests in many of their 
dasses they are only asked to fill in a blank or 
darken in a letter to indicate the right answer," he 
said, "This has an effect on the student's self- 
estote. If the student has a wrong answer on one 
of the computoized sheets, he gets it back without 

comuMnt." 

Luthriola asKra that the future of writing in 
Virginia Beach will be manifested by colleges ex- 
pecting more writing fompetence from its new 
students and then again when those students who 
becon^ toiK;hei^ of diffo-ent subjecu begin to 
t»Kd). 

"Tlie reqponsibiUty for the future rests in the 
coll^»." he said. "They must make more 
danan<b . . . and teachers in all disdpUnes must 
ask their students to write responibly, to wei^ 
(»n(«pts, ai^ me tlK relationship b^we«i fiMrts." 



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4 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 



Entertainment 





First Colonial Presents "Harvey 



>» 



Snuff's Chuck Larson, sitting, and Robbie 
House look at promising letter for a D.C. radio 
station. 



Nicholette Larson in Virginia Beach 



Snuff, Larson Sell Out Peabody's 

It was standing room only last weekend at Peabody's as Virginia Beach's country rock band Snuff 
opened the night for Los Angeles based performer Nicolette Larson. 

It was Larson's first visit to Virginia Beach, and Snuff is riding high following the recent release of their 
first album, entitled "Snuff," which local record stores report is selling very well. 

This weekend, Nov. 19 and 20, Snuff will perform in Charlottesville at Trax. The band will then take a 
five-day Thanksgiving holiday break but will be back at Michael's, at Hilltop, on Monday, Nov. 29. Snuff 
will also appear with the Sidp Castro Band from Charlottesville on Dec. 17 and 18 at Peabody's. 

Attendance at the recent Snuff/Larson show was approximately 700. 




Celeste Homecoming 



Beth Austin, Bill Boyer and Windy Linquist 



Cox Players Perform 



"Lo and Behold," a 
comedy by John Patrick, 
will be presented by the 
National Thespians and 
the Fine Arts Department 
of Frank W. Cox High 
School Nov. 18 and 19 at 
7:30 p.m. 

The play deals with a 
cynical nobel prize winner 
who, after twenty-five 



years as a semi-invalid, 
masterminds his own 
demise, hoping for a more 
peaceful way of life. In- 
stead of the peace he ex- 
pected, he is instead beset 
by wacky ghosts who have 
decided to haunt his 
house. 

For ticket information, 
call 481-6207. 



The Virginia Chapter of 
Young Audiences, in 
celebration of the national 
organization's 30 years of 
presenting quality live per- 
forming arts education to 
children, will hold a gala 
benefit on Thursday, Nov. 
18, at 7 p.m. at 1933 San- 
dee Crescent, Virginia 
Beach. The oscar-winning 
actress and National 
Young Audiences' ad- 
visory board member, 
Celeste Holm, will be the 
guest of honor. 

Holm will tell about her 
work with young people 
and speak about the im- 
portance of art education. 
Providing the musical en- 
tertainment will be The 



Locrian Early Music Con- 
sort, one of the Virginia 
Chapter's professional en- 
sembles. Dinner will be 
served. 

Tickets for the event are 
$15 per person. For furth« 
information contact Nam 
cy Herod at 623-5268. The 
proceeds of the event will 
go to sponsor arts 
education programs in 
Tidewater schools. 

The Virginia Chapter of 
Young Audiences is part 
of a national, non-profit 
organization that presents 
live performing artists in 
schools and other public 
locations primarily to 
children. No child is ever 
charged an admission fee. 



Colonial Dinner At Tabernacle 



Colonial dress, the 
aroma of hot cider and 
lamplight dinner will add 
to the festivities of the six- 
th annual "Colonial Din- 
ner", to be held at Taber- 
nacle United Methodist 
Church, 1265 Sandbridge 
Road, on Saturday Nov. 
20, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. 

The meal will feature 
country style ham or 
turkey, with collards, 
sweet potatoes, black eye 
peas or corn pudding, 
homebaked rolls or cor- 
nbrcad and pies 

adults. $2.50 children 10 

to i ', IMOSC UllUtI »> fiui\ 

eat free. Tickets may be 
purchased al the door and 
take out dlniieri will be 
available. Fur more in- 
formal ion call Mrs. James 



T.Morris. 426-7191. 

A Christmas Shoppe 
will be open during din- 
ner. 



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END OF SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE! 

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FAMOUS THANKSGIVING DINNER 



MICHAEL F. 
FASAN ARC, JR. 

Atlorney 
AlLaw 

^ Koger Executive Center 
bUITE2M 

Norfolk, Vt. ZXn 



It 's the same price as last year, the same 

fresh Rockingham turkey as last year, 

the same delicious baked Smithfield ham as 

last year - We felt that since you enjoyed 

it so much last year, why not do the same 

this year. Irving continuously from 

11:30a.m. -I0:30p.m. 

Choice of: 

Frait Chp Chicken Soup 

OraB«J«ice Tomato J«iM 

Choice of: 

Roast Princess Anne Turkey 

with Chippendale Dressing and Giblct Gravy 

Baked Luters Smithfield Ham 

< With Champagne Sauce 

Pickles 
Candied Yams Green Peas 

Cdery $C 50 Olives 

Cranberry Sauce '^ • Hot Rolls 

Children's Portions •2.75 

THE Circle 

«AKK>D RESTAURANT 
Mtf 1^ M. Pertomouib, Vi. 




The First Colonial 
X^eatre Association is 
performing ^'Harvey" on 
Nov. 17 and 18 at 7:30 
p.m. in the First Colonial 



High School auditorium. 

The cost is $2.50 for 
adults and $1.50 for 
students and children. 



"Love Course" At TCC 



"Love Course," a one 
act play about college lie, 
will be presented by the 
Drama Club at the 
Virginia Beach Campt^ of 
Tidewater Community 
College Tuesday. Nov. 16, 



at 12:30 p.m. in B-100. 

The play is free and 
open to the public. For 
more information, contact 
Student Activities, 427- 
3070, cxt. 139. 



Soprano To Perform At VWC 



Mezzo soprano Robyn- 
ne Redmon, a Virginia 
Wesieyan College alumna 
who spent two years as a 
biology major at VWC, 
will perform in the 
college's Monumental 



Chapel at 8 p.m. on 
Friday, Nov. 19. The con- 
cert is free and open to the 
public, but reservations 
are suggested. Call 461- 
3232. 



CLASP Bingo Night 

A bingo night for 
physically and mentally 
handicapfied people will 
be held Saturday, Dec. 4, 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
Location will be at the 
Kempsville Recreation 
Center, 800 Monmouth 
Lane, Virginia Beach. 

The Pembroke Kiwanis 
Club, the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation, and CLASP 
(Citizens Loving All 
Special People) will spon- 
sor the bingo night. 

Participation is free. 




^ 



-J 

.3 
TI 



) 



Prizes will be given for all 
games and a door prize 
will be given. Parents and 
guardians are welcome, 
however, chaperones are 
present at all times. 

Transportation is avail- 
able; however, for plan- 
ning purposes CLASP 
must know by Nov. 29. 
Call joy Stinnett at 499- 
7.619 weekdays fiom 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For further information 
call either John Ditty on 
424-6239 or Harry Baird 
on 486-31 10. 



Les Bryant, in tree, and Judith Haubrich 

** Apple Tree" in Kempsville 

Everyone loves a musical!" The Performing Arts unit 
of the Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Recreation is presenting Sheldon Harnick and Jerry 
Bock's "The Apple Tree" on Nov. 17. 18, 19 and 20 at 
8 p.m. and Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. at the VBRC/Kempsville 
Theatre. The Unit's version will feature "The Diary of 
Adam and Eve" by Mark Twain and "The Lady or the 
Tiger" by Frank R. Stockton. 

The director. Henry de Shields, is ably assisted by 
musical director Mary Jane Utley and choreographer 
Pilar Tapia. A special appearance will be made by 
a talking bird, as well as snakes and tigers, of course! 

The admission to this delightful family entertainment 
is $2 and reservations may be made by calling 495-1892. 



U i lP 





M on n§..: 



ige Crawford^ Morning Team 



il^ 



FOR a^ERYTHlNG YOO NEED TO KNOW, 

To Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 




PkMic397-llM 



Every 

morning, 

Mon.:Sat., 

WGHl 3 broadcasts a 

total of 1 1 up-to-minute 

traffic reports. One for you 

every 15 minutes, to and 

from work. Usten, and get to 

wfiere you're going, on time. 

Our 
Accu-Weather 
Keeps You 
AhesMJ of 
Mother N. 

Every momir^, 
Mon.-Sat WQH-B broad- 
casts a tcrtal of 25 exclusive 
Accu-Weather reports. Rain or 
shine; listen and you will be 
sure to know, t?efore It 
happens. 



This Week's 

Secret PerKHialtty Is: 

raniBCKMAN 





For Who, What, 
Where, When, Fast^ 

Every moming, 
Mon.-Sat, WGH-13 
broadcasts a total of 13 
news and sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

For Music 
That You Know. 

If you're driving along, you will 
be singing ak>ng. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tapping 
your toes. The 
musk: is the 
magk: of WGH-13. 






nt;^:i 











¥ 
i 



* 
i 



i 



s 

k 
-$ 

i 






ThiiW«!.'s 
S«:ret Personalily Is: 



5 






w 



•Mi 



•dSU 



i^^MM 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 5 



City Council 



Gaston Water Healthiest And Most Plentiful 



Continued from Page 1 
Lak^ Genito in connection 
with the ^jpomattcM Riv- 
er Water Authority; and 
ccmstruction of the Asso- 
mooskk Reservoir with a 
Nottoway River Pump- 
over. 



The cost of the Lake 
Genito project would have 
been the greatest, $232 
millicHi for the construct- 
ion of an additional impo- 
undment and 90 miles of 
I»peline. The construct- 



im of the Assomoosick 
Reservoir with a Nottaway 
River Pumpover, current- 
ly proposed by the South- 
eastern Public Service 
Authority (SPSA), would 



cost approximately $173 
millioi. 

GastOD was selected on 
the basis of six criteria - 
cost; environmental imp- 
act; legal, pditical and 



institutional issues; quan- 
tity; quality, and reliabil- 
ity. With Gaston ranking 
first in four of the six 
criteria used in the report, 
it "is the clear first choice 



Council Defers Ordinances On Lynnhaven Beach 



1^ 



Continued from Page 1 

dinances she concluded 
that no family going out 
on a pubfic beach would 
be permitted to carry even 
a jug of water for their 
children. "AH of our 
residents don't live on the 
beach or do not have the 
conveniences to get a 
drink of water," she said. 

The ordinance proposed 
to include in existing or- 
dinances the area on the 
Chesapeake Bay lying 
between Great Neck Road 
on the east and Kleen 
Street on the west. The 
ordinances already apply 
to the Beach Borough 
from Rudee Inlet to 42nd 
Street and in other cases to 
the area adjacent to the 
Lynnhaven Fishing Pier. 

The four ordinances 
would outlaw playing ball, 
using frisbees, etc. on the 
beach, taking food or 
drink on the beach or ad- 
jacent streets, making a 
Hre on beaches, and the 
parkkig or stopping of 
charter buses on all 
ittunicipal parking lots an 
all public streets. 

The proposed changes. 



which were deferred by 
Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday after- 
noon for three weeks, 
were an outgrowth of 
workshops in which 
residents participated. 

Dr. Daniel D. Dicken- 
son, representing the 
Westminister-Canterbury, 
a residential high-rise for 
the elderly, said that large 
extensive use is being 
made of the public beach 
in the area. He said that 
charter buses dispense 
passengers - not from 
Virginia Beach. He said 
they picnic and have loud 
music. He said crowds 
come in the hundreds. He 
said the people in the area 
are willing to abide by 
restrictions themselves in 
order to regain the use of 
the beach. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
said he was concerned 
about the fourth ordinan- 
ce which would prohibit 
parking of any charter bus 
or stopping of any charter 
bus for the purpose of 
picking up or discharging 
passengers in the area in 
the Lynnhaven Borough 



bounded on the south by 
Long Creek, on the west 
by the Lynnhaven Inlet, 
on the north by the 
Chesapeake Bay and on 
the east by Seashore State 
Park. 

Mayor Jones asked 
whether the intent was to 
prohibit alcohol or all 
drinks. 

Dickenson said that the 
only way to enforce a 
prohibition against 
alcohol was to prohibit all 
coolers from the- beach. 
All the tegulations are in 
effect on the Oceanfront, 
he said. 

Councilman Jack Jen- 
nings Jr., who requested 
submission of the amen- 
dments, said that without 
the background on the 
situation, the amendments 
appear harsh and extreme. 
He said that the problems 
began in 1981. He said 
that beach goers have 
taken portable generators 
on the beach to plug in 
electric guitars, have par- 
ties lasting all night, 
demand to use the 
restrooms at the Lyn- 
nhaven Pier Restaurant, 



the Fish house and even 
Westerminster-Canter- 
bury. He said the "ex- 
treme situation is one that 
requires definitive ac- 
tion." 

At the task force 
meetings, he said, it was 
clear that any rules should 
be applied across the 
board for residents and 
non-residents alike. He 
said that the ordinances 
will take away basic 
freedoms, but that the 
residents are willing to do 
tiiat. 

Councilman John A. 
Baum declared, 

facetiously, "I'm glad 
these were outsiders 
causing the trouble and 
nobody from Virginia 
Beach would do these 
things." 

Porter Hardy, retired 
long-time U.S. Represent- 
ative, who now lives at 
Westminister-Canterbury, 
said he couldn't sleep for 
the noise. Sometimes the 
language is vile, he said, 
and "I don't believe any 
of this comes froth 
residents of Virginia 
Beach." 



Arthur R. Brown, of 
2209 Starfish Road, said 
that he chose his home for 
the quiet, beauty and its 
proximity (three blocks) 
from the Beach. However, 
he said, the beach is being 
taken away from us. He 
said the people come from 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Suffolk, Zuni and what- 
ever, loaded down with 
food and coolers. They 
ignore parking signs and 
leave litter, urinate in 
public "and other 
things." He said he can 
hear the noise three blocks 
away. He said he was 
"willing to forgo carrying 
my cooler just so 1 can 
walk and look at the beach 
sunset,'' 

Councilman John A. 
Baum said he felt sure that 
Council would have to 
adopt the ordinances. He 
said all have to be restric- 
ted because some abuse 
the beach. 

Councilman Robert G. 
Jones said that he notices 
all kinds of ice. chests on 
the beachfront, "Is there 
some way we can write an 
ordinance which is enfor- 
ceable?" he asked. 



for a water supply for 
Virginia Beach," Mueh- 
lebeck said. 

Meuhlenbeck said that 
Govemo' Charles Robb 
has agreed that it is the 
most logical, most feasi- 
ble and least disruptive 
option. Any approach, 
Robb said, clearly must 
represent an equitable so- 
lution for the people living 
in the vicinity of Lake 
Gaston as well as the 
people of Virginia Beach. 

TTie chcMce will envious- 
ly have some affect on 
SPSA's plans to pursue 
the Assomoosick reservoir 
as a regicmal source since. 
Virginia Beach would be 
the biggest custcxner of a 
regicHial water system. 
The report maintains that 
this alternative was sele- 
cted by SPSA primarily 
because of the acceptabil- 
ity of the proposal to the 
localities in which the 
facilities would be locat- 
ed. However, the report 
also states that there are 
considerable environ- 
mental, water quality and 
institutional stumbling 
blocks associated with this 
alternative. 

Lake Gastoi has the 
capacity to meet regional 
needs. The Carps of 
Engineers which had wig- 
inally proposed Gastcm as 
a regional source, determ- 
ined that 352 mgd (million 
gall(Mis a day) is available 
for an out-of-basin with- 
drawal without signifi- 
cantiy impacting downstr- 
eam release requirements 



AD(mnifi£f GtftFimier 



Notes to my 
Friends... 



by JIM KINCAID 
Hardbound $1 1 .95/Quality Paperback $6.95 




WEDDING RECEPTIONS 

Catering Is The Way 

// Years Experience 

Call Mr. Gourmet 

He's International, 

but Local I 

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Quality Paperback »6.95 

Norfolk Tricentennial 
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by Carroll Walker »4.95 




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can only 
do SO much. 

Unwanted facial hair can't be covered 
up with make-up. Hair removal is 
painless with REMOVATRON. So 
don't cover it, get rid of any unwanted 
hair today, at Tidewater's only 
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^ 547-5289 ^''W 



EHane Ribcrdy Owner & Operator 

120-D Tildcn Ave. 

Gr«tt Bridge and Chesapeake 

Mon-Wed,Fri9-« Thurs9-7 Sat 8-5 



or lake levels. Bytt^year 
2030 Virginia Beach's 
water needs will be 50 
mgd, less than one per- 
cent of the average flow of 
the Roendce River (Gast- 
on) but it is about six 
percent (rf^ the average 
flow in the Appomattox 
and Nottoway Rivers. 

Gaston ruil»d: 

•First in environmental 
impact. Hie Assomoosick 
Reservdr would flood, th- 
ousands of acres of prime 
environmental wetlands 
and Lake Genito would 
eliminate many miles of a 
scenic river. Also, the 
Corps of Engineers has 
already completed a prel- 
iminary environmental 
impact statement for Lake 
Gaston and concluded 
that the project is sound 
fron an environmental 
perspective. 

•First in quality. The 
Assomoosick alternative 
is projected to have heavy 
natural pdlution resulting 
in tough treatment prob- 
lems. The Assomoosick 
Reseroir will contrib- 
ute to existing taste, odor 
and trihalomethane 
(THM) problems resulting 
from the swampy nature 
of reservoirs constructed 
in southeastern Virginia. 
Lake Gaston has excellent 
water and the presence of 
Lake Kerr upstream con- 
tributes to desirable raw 



water readily amendable 
to conventional treatment 
practices. 

•First in reliability. The 
Lake Gaston alternative is 
predicated on well-known, 
traditional water supply 
practices that have been 
used for decades. Lake 
Genito and Assamoosick 
were ranked equally. 

The Lake Gaston alter- 
native ranks close to 
Assamoosick in cost. 
However, it was ranked 
third in legal political and 
institutional issues 
because of substantial op- 
position expected from 
local interests around the 
lake. 

Also considered in the 
report were fresh ground 
and surface water and/or 
construction of a desalting 
plant within the city and 
the expansion of the Nor- 
folk Water Supply 
System. These alternatives 
together would furnish the 
water needed by the beach 

but none alone could meet 
future needs. Neither the 
wells, surface water or 
desalting proved to be ac- 
ceptable and Norfolk has 
indicated it does not plan 
to expand its water supply 
facilities in western Tide- 
water. 

Muehlenbeck also poin- 
ted out that Lake Gaston 
already has five major im- 
poundments. 



Famfly Week Proclaimed 



Beach Ma^^J^trisR. Jones, has 

^, , *the week d^m^^^BSfm^^ 27 , 

ftftnKsgWng week, as "^Irflf^witr." 

Jones recently signed a proclamation declaring 
the week, and presented it to Mrs. Arthur L. 
Richardson, president of the Princess Anne 
Woman's Club. 

The proclamation reads : 

WHEREAS, the Princess Anne Woman's Club 
joins the General Federation of Woman's Club in 
the desire to see a strengthening of the family unit 
in our nation; and 

WHEREAS, the membership of these clubs en- 
courages all citizens to plan holiday activities 
which include as many family members as 
possible; and 

WHEREAS, the Princess Anne Woman's Club 
members believe that spending quality time and 
showing sincere concern for family and friends are 
rewarding ways to express thankfulness. 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Louis R. Jones, 
Mayor of the City of Virginia Beach, do hereby 
prclaim the week of November 21-27, 1982, 
Thanksgiving Week, as "Family Week," in the 
City of Vkginia Beach and urge citizens to spend 
time with their family members and be joyous on 
this holiday occasion; as we give thanks for our 
nation's history and future and, also, for the 
relatives and friends that are a part of it all. 
Signed, Louis R. Jones, Mayor, Virginia Beach. 



DAR Meeting Set 



Mrs. Burton A. 
Weishet, a member of the 
Adam Thoroughgood 
Chapter DAR, will hold 
the Thursday, Nov. 18 
meeting in her home, 5184 
Shenstone Drive, at 10 
a.m. Co-hostess for the 
meeting is Mrs. WilUam F. 
Vose. 

Christmas gifts will be 
a>llected for the Veteran 
patients at the Veteran's 



Administration of Ham- 
pton. For further answers 
to questions on these gifts 
call Mrs. W. Eaton at 460- 
0512. 

Dr. E. Grant Meade, 

Professor Emeritus, Old 
Dominion University, 
Department of Political 
Science and Geography, 
will speak on "How to 
Recognize Propaganda." 



Easter Seal Run 



The Virginia Beach 
ChaptH' of the Easter Seal 
Soci^ for the crippled 
children and adults is 
sponsoring an "Exec- 
Trek"! It ta a 15 kilometer 
walk-a-thon for kids and 
adults to be held on 
Saturday. Nov. 20 at 
Mount Trashmore in 
Virginia Bnch, banning 
at 10 a.m. 

Individuals, family 
units, or q)edal trekka 



teams may enter to 
represent businesses, 
churches, clubs, 

organizations, or family. 

There will be prizes, 
trophies, and catered 
goodies for participants at 
the Jewish Mother restau- 
rant following the trek. 

For further infor- 
mation, call the Virginia 
BmA Easter tod Society 
at 468-3140. 



^^^^MM^AA^^^Mb^H^iU 



^^^M 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 




Lankford Chosen 
Teacher Of Year 



Paul G. Lankford, a 35- 
year-old English teacher at 
Green Run High School in 
Virginia Beach, has been 
named the state English 
Teacher of the Year by the 
Virginia Association of 
Teachers of English. 

To be nominated for the 
prestigious state honor, 
Lankford earlier had been 
selected Virginia Beach 
English Teacher of the 
Year by members of the 
Virginia Beach 

Association of Teachers 
of English. 

Lankford 's credentials 
for the award are many 
and varied: 

•He is chairman of the 
school's 25-person English 
department, the largest 
department of any school 
in Virginia Beach. 

•He teaches both 
superior and remedial 
English, and most of his 
students request assign- 
ment to his classes because 
of his reputation for fair- 
ness, thoroughness, and 
knowledge of subject. 

•He serves as president 
of the school's faculty in- 
structional advisory com- 



mittee and chairman of 
the steering committee 
which will involve the en- 
tire school staff in a state 
accreditation review next 
year. 

•He helps conduct in- 
service training for the 
division's English 
teachers. 

•He is an active member 
of the Virginia Beach 
Reading Council and ser- 
ves on the World 
Literature Committee of 
the National Council of 
Teachers of English. 

Lankford holds a 
bachelor's degree in 
English from the College 
of William and Mary 
(Class of '69), and a 
mastec ' » < dcgMe ^ 
education from Old 
Dominion University 
(1977). 

He was one of the 
original teachers assigned 
to Green Run High when 
it opened in 1979; he 
previously taught at 
Bayside High for ten 
years. His wife, Deborah, 
also teaches English at 
Green Run High. 



Beta Sigma Phi Meets 

Members of Preceptor 
Alpha Xi of Beta Sigma 
Phi will meet at the home 
of Judy Holland, 833 Earl 
of Chesterfield Lane, on 
Thursday, Nov. 18, at 
7:30 p.m. 



All proceeds will go 
toward the Crippled 
Chidren's Hospitals. Af- 
ter the business meeting, 
Holland will present a 
program on self-defense. 



Student Creative Corner 



Serene Life In The Country 

Life in the country wotild be lovdy, to be able 
to meander through forests and meadowes filled 
with periwinlde and forget-me-nots. 

Wouldn't it be wond^-ful to sit and listen to tlie 
birds chirping and tlw gurgling iM-ook reeling 
along. You mi^t choose to sit in the soft, 
luscious, plushly piled, green gnm for houn upon 
hours. 

I am sure any person would love to camp in the 
country and watch the wild and the tame creatures 
as they feed, run, play, and take care of their 
young. 

Occasionally you could stroll through the 
woods, watching and studying the wild and scarce 
plants, trees, and (Iowa's. Perhaps you would be 



able to look closely at a miniature orchid 
growning in the moss by a tumbling, flurishing 
waterfall. 

Yes, wouldn't it be nice to sit and let your mind 
wander or rove, while a soft breeze goitly combs 
your hair? 

It truly would be wonderful to explore dwk and 
murky caves that are on tlM side of rolling hiUs. 

Life In the country would be lively, yet very 
pcMxful and tranqufl. 

By Megan Crandall. the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. S. M. Crandall of the King's Forrest Section 
of Virginia Beach. Mcyan is a student in Jnnne 
French's sixth grade dass at Malibu Elonentary 
School. For the essay, M^an received the White 
Award through the 4-M Club at the Neptune 
Festival Country Fair I^. 



Untitled 

The sun is yellow. 
So is the hair on my head 

God is love. 
So God I have lots of. 

Jesus is obedient to God. 
So is the soul of me. 



VbXtaia 
Virginia Btadi Sun l9i 
pMe avM. Abo iKtaii 
Bnck8u,IMS. 
editkM is the Friday btforc 



By Ronald Saunders 

the sun is bright. 
Sois the body (^me. 

The grass is green. 
So are the eyes <tf me. 

Ronald is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L Hobbs. He 
is also a student in Mrs. Rosemary Skees' fifth grade 
class at Arrowhead Elementary School. 



cfcativt writiag to 7%e 



iR lavHcd umi eacoungcd to nbmit coapMad 
Eumpici mul iadad* Ike slndMM'a 
of Ifet ttadcnt'i Ea^iii teacher aid tta ichool't 

Vlfibda Beach, VA, 234S2. For more iafonnlioa caO 4IM43«. 



toThaVliiiafai 
for Mch Wcdanday's 




Wendy Darta, 14, wW dance the role 
Doll" at the PavlUoB on Friday, Nov. 19 at S p.i 

Magic World Of Ballet 
Set For The Pavilion 



McDonald Addresses 100 Businessmen At Briefs 



The relationship be- 
tween the United States 
Navy and the City of 
Virginia Beach has never 
been better according to 
Adm. Wesley L. 
McDonald, Supreme Al- 
lied Commander Atlantic, 
Commander in chief, Atl- 
antic and Atlantic Fleet. 

McDcKiald's comments 
were made recently be- 
iatt 100 members of the 
Virginia Beach Chamber 



of Commerce at its month- 
ly "Beach Briefs" sessicai 
at Valle's Steak House on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 
"My being here symb- 
dizes the coc^ration be- 
tween the Navy and this 
great resist city by the 
sea," he said. "Navy 
members are an intregal 
part <^ this city." Not 
only are Navy personnel 
involved in onnmunity ac- 
tivities such as church 



functions and little Lea- 
gue, they are active in 
municipal afGurs as well. 
"Yes, they even pay per- 
sonal property taxes," he 
mused. 

Less than one-sixth of 
all Navy families live in 
government-sponsored 
housing, McDonald point- 
ed out. Therefore, he 
said, the Navy plays a big 
role in community affairs. 
To underscore his point. 



McDonald noted that 
some 446,800 Navy famil- 
ies live in the Tidewater 
area. 

In closing, McDonald 
said he approaches his job 
"with a lot of enthusiasm 
and a little intrepidation." 
He said Americans are 
under a constant threat 
from Communism, but 
"we can face up to the 
Soviet threar." 



Virginia Beach Wins Litter Awax^^^ 2-3i« 



The Virginia Division of 
Litter Control has infor- 
med the City of Virginia 
Beach that it has been 
designated as one of the 
top twelve comprehensive 
programs of litter control 
in the Commonwealth. 

The City will receive the 
Governor's Award of Ex- 
cellence for its accom- 
plishments. Localities 
were chosen for their 
comprehensive approach 
utilizing the five elements 
of planning and organiz- 
ation, communications, 
education, cleanup, and 
law enforcement. 

The award will be 
presented at the Keep 



Virginia Beautiful Annual 
Awards Luncheon to be 
held on January 19, 1993 



at the Hotel Jxriui Mar- 
shall in Richmond. 
For further infor- 



mation, contact Donna 
Ponti, clean community 
coordinator, at 427-4104. 



The Tidewater Ballet 
Association's holiday 
presentation of the 
"Magic World of BaUet" 
win be performed at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion 
on Friday, Nov. 19, at 8 
p.m. 

The multifaceted 
program of dance will in- 
clude the enchanting 
"Fairy Doll," the pas de 
deux from "Nutcracker" 
and the famous Russian 
divertissements, "Paqu- 
iU." 

The "Fairy DoU" is the 
story of a charming doll 
who brings all the dolls in 
a toyshop to human life 
for a celebration. 

The ballet will be po*- 
formed by TBA's junior 
and senior companies and 

Michael "Barriskill, 
Amanda Beard, Wendy 
Daria, Jennifer 

Friedrichsen, Kristen 
Harris, Ladianne Haida*- 



son, Jill Johnson, B^ 
Madison, Kristin MUlw, 
Seana Murphy, Scott 
Pepper, DeShelle Perry, 
Jomifer Sax and Rebecn 
Taylor. 

Virginia Beach choreo- 
gri^jher Patricia Sorrell 
has staged this delightful 
ballet diat was flrst per- 
formed in 1888 in Vioma. 

The popular "Nut- 
cracker Pas (te Deux" will> 
be performed by two ex> 
citing young dancers: 
Michael BarriskitI and 
Yvoiwe Borree. 

Callie Caperton, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Caperton of 
Virginia Beach, wiU be 
featured as a demi^crioist 
in "Paquita." 

Tickets for the per- 
foin^uice a^ availaMe 
^daiJliePar«^yi^9^^- 
fice and the Tidewater 
Ballet Anociation. For 
additional informiMion, 
telephone 622-4822 or 
463-0022. 



Student Reading Problems Discussed 

Barbara McGronan, reading diagnostidan with the 
Virginia Beach School Board, will discuss "The 
Reading Process and Student's Problems with 
Reading" in a'lecture and discu»ion on Thursday, Nov. 
18 at 8 p.m. in the OceanfrorU Branch of the Virginia 
Bcadi Public Library. 

McGronan's lecture is in^ided for adults and 
registration in advance is required. Her fmaentatimi is 
intended for »iults and may have particiUar importance 
for parents of school-age childroi. 

Interested adults may register by contacdhg the 
Ubrary at 428-41 13. 



Schizophrenia 

Group 

To Meet 



The Relatives and 
Friends Group of the 
Schizophrenia Foundation 
of Virginia will meet at 
7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 
Nov. 23 at 7:30 p.m. at 
Beach House, 2420 
Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Representatives from 
Comprehensive Mental 
Health Services will be 
present. 

For further infor- 
mation, call 499-2041 
between 10 a.m. and 4 
p.m. weekdays. 




CHARLES 
REPAIR SERVICE 

SEWING MACHINES & 
VACUUM CLEANERS 

WESERVICE 

ALL MAKES 
AND IF IT TAKES O VER 24 HRS. TO 
REPAIR YOUR MACHINE, 
WE'LL LOAN YOU ONE! 

WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS! ! ! 

497-4641 OR 467-1913 

400 OPAL AV£.*NORFOLK, VA 
■■■■I OPENMON.^AT. 

I y I 9 a^. to 10 p.ai. 





SHORT NOTICE PUBLIC AUCTION 

General InformttaM: Compfete 17 bales of fine Orioiul carpeU and n^ marked IWimiot Home 
Decoraiors sold on stipulated date to tlw Sp«;ialta Carpet IXstributon, N.Y. la tJie bMcnm it hu 
been established and conrirmed that the Interior Home Decorators has been doacd and tlwcfcm 
the consignment has been prevent«l from departing the Transit Warehouse. 

Fine Persian A OricataJ 
Haad OntteA Carpcto A Rafi 

Ori^M a §is(s: High grades in wool silk, rilk and wo<N fron Po^ M(iMui, Af^MoMan. 

Caucasus from 3 x 2 ft. (90 x 60 cm.) to 14.0 x 10.0 ft. (427 x 305 cm.) 

Ter^ For Uqaidatioa: Cash or Cheques. 

AH pay mcrU to aMiborized recipicaia are M FWcHly Utfoa Trwt Co. 

EmNre Storap-Ageat of Atttd Vaa Ltaca- 
130 S. MHMary HIgkwiv • Nwrfolk 



Vtew at 1 P.M 
Pryi/At Hoter L^pM^MS 
Each r«g cmbcs wHfe a 
OrieNM mug wiN fee i^vea away 



^t. Nov. 27a<2p.i 



ccfWkMe «r awlfcMikHy. 



» 



Virginia 

AUTO 
RENTAL 

Incorporated 





5901 Virginia ]^h Blvd. 




WB...^^ viiur Stvlel 



^'^^ ^ Perms. Colors, < 


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r "'* 


Cuts A U Carte Fdr Mea Women & CMdrah 




No Appofritmenu, Just V/Mc M 




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Pcfiin Fof 




Sianpoo, Haircut & aow^>y 




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Monday^nday 
Weekoxis 


S8.50 


Al Permanents CompWe Including 




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Haifcut Shartpoo, Set or BtovHDiy 




Mng H* ThK RiqiAti ^v« Ttnt « Its. More) 




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(Long Hair a Ewa MMrM tS-S IOi» Mora) 




(lO&Under} 








Haincut Indudng 9iampcx) 


S4X» 


Hafr' Colofing 




No Filb Ciit^ Etc 




irKhjdlng Siampoo. Set or Btow-Oy 




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tMO 


Srigle Process (Tnij 


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tzm 


Frosting or Double Pnxess 


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Siampoo&Set 


am 


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Each Additional Extra AppNcacion 


SS40 


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I 

Sports 



Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 7 



I ■ ■ ■ 

jP.A. Cheerleaders No. 1 



\ By Jackie Matthews 
' Sun Correspondent 

: The Virginia Beach 
pheering Association 
recently held its S^ond 
Annual Cheering Contest 
bt the KempsviUe Recre- 
ation Center. 

k Before Uie girls entered 
^ e building they began 
dieering. After they were 
irouped in the gym, the 
linUcipation of the com- 
petition was felt by all as 
the chanting of their 
icheers became louder and 
|ouder. 
Mr. Richard Sauls, 
resident of the Virginia 
ich Recreation Center 
KempsviUe, began by 
introducing the judges: 
Sue McKianey, UNC 
cheerleader; Pe^y Shull, 
cheering sponsor; Jim 
Cutchins, Recreation 
Department Head of Tide- 
water Community Col- 
lege; Murph Burns, P.E. 
and Health Instructor of 



Tidewater Community 
College; Mark Palaa^uski, 
P.E. Instructor; Bonnie 
Afford, former Booker T. 
Washington cheerleader. 

Mrs. Anna Galbraith, 
President of the Virginia 
Beach Cheering 

Association, read the rules 
and then turned the 
program over to the 
master of ceremonies, 
Jerry Timm. Actor, Jerry 
Timm of "Another Life" 
on the CBN, channel 26 
kq}t the spirit moving as 
he progreued through the 
two hour program. 

There were seven 
categories of competition. 
As e^ch squad was called, 
each was allowed three 
minutes in which to per- 
form. They were judged 
on clarity of voice pro- 
jection, precision of 
movement, cheer 
execution, timing for- 
mation, and enthusiasm. 



No more than IS girls 
^ere allowed on a squad 
with mascots being op- 
tional. Any squad was 
allowed to participate as 
long as the ages remained 
from six years to 17 years. 
Thirty-five squads com- 
peted, each girl in the 
seven winning squads 
received an engraved 
wooden placque. 

The seven categories of 
competition and the win- 
ners are listed as follows: 

Six to seven years, 
Woodstock Raiders, flag. 
Eight to nine years, 
Woodstock Cowboys, 
flag. Six to 11 years, 
Thalia Malibu Falcons, 
no lb. tackle. 110 lb. 
tackle, Aragona Pem- 
broke Cowboys. 130 lb. 
tackle, Stumpy Lake Car- 
dinals. 170 lb. tackle, 
KempsviUe Blues. High 
School, Princess Anne 



High School. 

. The Virginia Beach 
Cheering Association is a 
non-profit organization, 
formed in Sept., 1981, 
with the purpose of 
recognizing the accom- 
pUshments of the cheer- 
leaders. Programs are 
being offered for cheer- 
leaders and their coaches. 
With competition and 
knowledge working 
together, better cheer- 
leaders should be the 
results. 

The first cheering com- 
petition was held last 
November. There were 
300 participants. The 
second competition sur- 
passed that number with 
400 participants and 1,200 
spectators. Next year's 
connietition is scheduled 
to be held at the Green 
Run High School in order 
to accomodate the in- 
creasing number of cheer- 
leaders and spectators. 




Worrell Race To Be Aired On CBN 



"The 1982 WorreU 
1000" wiU be aired on 
Saturday, Nov. 20 at 9 
a.m. on the CBN cable 
network. It wiU also be 
aired on WYAH, chumel 
27, on Dec. llatTpjn. 

it is projected tlut over 
the cable network the 48 
minute documentary wiU 
reach between 17 and 18 
miUion hous^olds. 

CBN filmed the Hobie 
Cat sailing race last sum- 
mer. The race began in 



Florida and terminated in 
Virginia Beach with 
numerous stops and 
checkpoints along the 
way, aU of which was 
filmed. 

"This wiU allow the 
people to see the whole 
race," said race producer 
Mike Worrell, including 
interviews with the teams. 

WorreU. the originator 
of the race and who has 
also won it a couple times. 



said the film was finished 
last September, but was 
then re-edited and the 
final proudct was released 
last week. It is estimated 
tfiat it cost CW4 about 
^SO,000 to film the race. 

Worrell is especially 
proud that the race wiU be 
covered annuaUy by CBN 
noting, "how many spor- 
ting events in this area are 
televised on an annual 
basis?" WorreU also said 
that the telecasting of the 



film win be in the best in- 
terest of the City of 
Virginia Beach. 

"Our city's name wiU 
be broadcast aU over the 
world," he said, "and it 
highUghts one of the m<»t 
popular aspects of 
Virginia Beach: its 
beach." 

The 1983 WorreU 1000 
WiU begin on Thursday, 
May 26 and should end on 
Tuesday, May 31. 



Beacli Cottimunity Services 

isiB^KnnT aril ;« 8 mil ,Jlii<>T. ,, 



The> Virginia Beach 
Community Services 
Board will conduct a 
pubUc hearing on its draft 
Comprehensive Plan or 

lader Wedding 

Carlton Blake Rader 
wOl marry Claudia Mark- 
hiam Gunther on Jan. 29, 
1983 at the Second 
Presbyterian Church in 
|«fewport News. Due to a 
typ<^raphical error in last 
week's issue, name was in- 
^rrectly speUed. 



Hiursday, Nov. 18, ai 
7:30 p.m. in the Cit> 
CouncU Chambers, Ad- 
ministration Building, 
Princess Anne Municipal 
Center. The Plan deals 
with mental hralth, men- 
tal retardation and sub- 
stance abuse services in 
the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

The Community Ser- 
vices Board is the local 
agency responsible to City 
CouncU for pubUc nioital 
health, mental retardation 
and substance abuse ser- 



vices for the residents of 
Virginia Beach. The 
Board is holding the 
Public Hearing to provide 
interested individuals in 
the community, as weU as 
public and private agen- 
des and organizaUons, an 
opportunity to express 
their views on the 
propoMdPlan. FoUowing 
the Public H«uii«. the 
CommunityNi^ervices 

Board wiU adofrt its Final 
Plan which WiU then be 
the basis for its requwt for 
future prognaB and fun- 
ding support from the 
City Council and the 
State. 



tfkdividua:is interested 
in speaking at the hearing 
Should call 499-3737 to 
have their name placed on 
the speaker's Ust. Persons 
speaking as individuals 
will be allotted ten 
miiiitt». Persons unable 
to attend the public 
hearing may submit writ- 
ten testimony to the 
community Services 
Board Administration Of- 
fice, Pembroke Six, Suite 
218, Virginia Beach, 
Vhrj^ttla 23462 by Novem- 
ber % 1982. 

"Unsung, the noblest 
dee^wUldie." 



The Princess Anne High School cheerieaders placed first in cheerleading competition held recently at the Kem- 
psviUe Recreation Outer. Cheerleaders, back row, left to right, are: KrisUna Deeds, Candl Cannon, April Winkler, 
Shanda Binder, Angel Dibbs, Cheryl Stewari, Karen CoUins, Debbie Merritt, Stacy Moore, Anne Marie Monaco, 
and Amity Pero. Center row, back to front are: Theresa Higbae, Beth Copeland, Bridgette Bell and Lana Danley. 




6,000 Scouts converged on the PaviUon 



By Jackie Matthews 



6,000 Scouts, 20,000 Spectators 



More than 20,000 spec- 
tators visited the Pavilion 
this past weekend. The at- 



"1 




traction was the Tidewater 
Council #596 Annual Boy 
Scout Show. Major 
General Thomas Darling, 
USAF was the General 
Chairman. AU 6.000 boy 
scouts attending were 
from Tidewater Virignia 
and North Carolina. The 
theme this year was 
"Footsteps of the Foun- 
ders: Pathways to the 
Future." 

Some of the special 
guests entertaining were 
Chuck Norris, The Civil 
War Reenactment Team - 
Mahone's Bridgade, 
Atlantic Fleet &md and 
Gymstrada - plass Three 
Team. 

Scouts from 200 units 
displayed projects they 
had been working on since 
August. The most unusual 
display was from troop 



467, sponsored by Tim- 
berlake Homeowners 
Association of Virginia 
Beach. The exhibit was a 
moon rock borrowed 
from the National 
Aeronautics and Space 
Administration valued at 
about SI miUion doUars. 

Scouts of post 911 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach PoUce Department 



received on the job 
training as they assisted 
the Virginia Beach Police 
with security and parking 
at the PaviUon during 
Saturday's Show. 

The Scout Council was 
very pleased with the large 
number of displays and 
spectators, they expect 
next years show to be even 
larger. 



Soft Sculpture and Quilting 

Lynne Sward, award winning fiber artist and 
designer, wUl demonstrate soft sculpture and quilting 
techniques in a lecture and display on Wednesday, Nov. 
17 at 7 p.m. in the Bayside Branch of the Virginia Beach 
Public Library. 

Sward's demonstration is free, and it offers both the 
novice and the advant^ worker in textiles an oppor- 
tunity to learn directly from a practing textile artist. 

Registration in advance for the demonstration is 
required. Interested individuals may register by contac- 
Ung the Ubrary at 464-92^. 



IC A Pound Off AH 

BIG RED 

Dried Dog And Cat Food 

Through November 27 



Southern States 

Chesapeake AssoclaUon 

1764 Somb MillUry Highway 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



GEORGIA'S 
HAIRSTYLES 



418-3440 

. UWMS: 
0«rH MiM V*£ *•« 
OnCatortW 



INimDUCTDflY mi FACIAL^ 

I Haircuts 
I Blow Ory 



SKMCMIPIIOI 



I HMXlit 



.TIT'' 



^v***" aA9w"! 

kma«30 .^^F*"n 

, WTTH THI-i COl ntN . " J 

bpiresNov. M. I^^l 

CM Akemi F« Appl. 



Mibtsry 

Cut ...... •3.00] 

Shampoo & 

Set ... ••.00 

HSH<CUl& 
S«l "OOO 

Expires Nov. 30, 1982 






■iik 



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^mm 



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8 Vimnia Beach Sun. November 17, 1982 



i 



The Woman's View 



The Chopping Block 



Cranberry Crazy 

Of course, no Thankgiving Day dinner would be 
complete without the cranberry sauce, but there are 
many other ways to use this bright berry in your hdiday 
cooking and baking. 



CRANBERRY NUT BREAD 

2 cups all-purpose flour 

I cup sugar 

11/2 teaspoons baking powder 

I teaspofm nutmeg 

1/2 teaspoon baking soda 

3/4 cup orange juice 

1 tablespoon grated orange peel 

2 tablespoons shortening , . - . 
I egg, well beaten 

I 1/2 cups ffesh or frozen cranberries, j ^fit 
coarsely cheeped 
1/2 cup chipped walnuts 




Pour On 
The Sauce 



Preheat oven to 350° F. In large bowl mix flour, sugcr, 
baking powder, nutmeg and baking soda. Stir in 
orange juice, wange peel, shortening, and egg. Mix 
ingredients well until blended. Stir cranberries and 
nuts. Spoon into 9" loaf pan greased on bcMtom only. 
Bake for 55 minutes. Cod «i rack iot 15 minutes; 
remove from pan. 



Fresh cranberry sauce is a versatile addition to your 
menu, since there are so many ways you can use it. 
Delight your family with a fresh approach to the dd 
favorite. 

BASIC CRANBERRY SAUCE 
Makes 2 1/4 cups 

/ cup water 
1 cup granulated sugar 
3 cups fresh or frozen cranberries 
'" ~ dash allspice 
In medium saucepan, combine water and sugar. Stir to 
dissolve sugar. Bring mixture to boil. Add cranberries 
and allspice and reduce heat to medium low. Cook until 
skins p>op. Pour mixture into bowl; cool completely at 
room temperature and refrigerate until Arm. 
Note: To make jellied sauce, fdlow same recipe but 
strain mixture before pouring into bowl to cool. 



10 Locations Offer 
Beauty On A Budget 

Low pricra, good service and no appointments is the 
theme of the Edie Adams Cut & Curl Beauty salons. 

Originated in the New York area in 19SS and now 
with over 500 salons nationwide, the franchise is expan- 
ding rapidly and is expected to become one of the largest 
in America. 

In July, 1970, Delbert Sexton, a newly retired naval 
officer, and his wife, Alice, owners/managers of 10 
Bdie Adams Cut & Curl Salons in the Tidewater area, 
bought their first franchise and opened their first salon 
in the Witchduck and Virginia Beach Boulevard area. 

Since then, they have aquired nine other salons in the 
Tidewater area which they both own and manage. 

Their Son, Delbert, Jr. graduated in 1973 from 
beauty school and is a manager and director of training 
for all the salons. Their daughter Linda is in the process 
of training as a manager and will assist in the opening of 
new salons already in the planning stages. . . ..^^a. 

If you're in a hurry, low on cash and need help with 
your hair needs, you may want to call or visit the Edie 
Adams salon in your area. 



All the Edie Adams salons pride themselves on beitig 
able to change with the needs of their customers. One 
of the best examples is their approach to the growing 
importance of hair care for men . 

Edie Adams now features a complete range of mens' 
lAir services, including mens' perms, the natural way to 
^td fullness to hair. 




Announcements 



CouncU III of the Blue Rklge Region of International 
Toostmistress Clubs, tlM WcM-ld Wide Educational and 
Qmununications Training C^-ganization, is holding its 
quttterly meeting Sattu-day, Dec. 4 at Casa Farello's 
Restaurant^ 1800 Bako- Roa^, Virginia BefKrh. 

The meetis^ thane B"Ke^ the Wheds Turning." Tlie 
Hostess for the meting is tlw Princess Qub, Tlie day will 
be fined with wOTkshbps fnwi vsuid aids and microph<nie 
teduoqties to sbeecli cbntett speeches and procedures. 

These workshops wiD be hi^ tv the Uboty Bdl Qub. 

The meeting will opoi at ih30 a.m. and close at 3 p.m. 

The public ffi invited. 

The meedng coordinatOT is Mvilyn Ashley of 1705 
Pladd Court, Virgink Beach 23436. She can be r»ched 
at 427-1242 (home) or 480-2660 (office). 
The repstntf is Sandi Joyner of 809 Dorset Avenue, Por- 
tsmought 23701. She can be readied at 485-9122. 
The cost is $LSO for registratk>n, $1 .50 for hospitality and 
$7.50 for lumA OndtuUng gratuity) for a total of $10.50. 
Make checks pi^able to "Princess Qub." RegisUation 
deadline is Nov. 27, 1982 and the cancellation deadline is 
Nov. 30. 



Edie Aihuns 

(wllU.HC.il4* BEAUTY S 



BEAUTY salon; 



From North Georgia Mountains To Virginia Beach 



The wood crafters of the North Georgian mountains 
know their stuff and Jack and Edith Wikle, owners of 
Country Heritage in the Providence Square Shopping 
Center in Virginia Beach know it. •■.na 

Migrating from Georgia, due to a job transfer about 
five years ago. Jack left his job after a year here to 
devote all his time bringing the fantastic wood crafted, 
hand-made and hand-carved country-style furniture to 
Virginia Beach. 

These folks saw a need and filled it. Supply and 
demand have kept them going. One only has to browse 
awhile in this country-style shop to see some of the 
finest furniture, accessories and decor ever to come out 
of mountainous north Georgia. 




A qpck look at the hand rubbed oil finish tells you 
"they care". It is warm. It is natural. Special stains are 
used to highlight the wood grains before they are oiled. 
One i^ticul^.item that i^'ih much cfl^and is the 
various Qak' Pedestal Tables and Chairs (finished to 
customer spedfications). 

Using a direct shop approach to selling their wares 
has been very successful. Most suppliers are realty 2 to 4 
man operations and many of the craftsmen have over 30 
or 40 years experience making country furniture. The 
detail in the carvings points to the obvious pride these 
artisfS take in their work. This furniture is different - it's 

J totally personal, it's genuinely made with'pride (by han-^ 

^ ds, not computerized assembly lines). 

XtJluairy, fiiairjr'orthe'handinaire craft items are ainix, 
of mountain craft and local tfrafti/neii (ah)^ women). 

You will be amazed at the beautiful array of caiico , 
accessories, folk-art, frames, split oak baskets,, 
ceramics, cross stitch and hand painted items, such as 
trunks, hutches, mirrors and sconces. 

Decoys and decoy kits for the hunter, stained glass, 
tins and pottery (handmade of course) for the home. 
Braided rugs and stencils; candles, wooden toys that will 
last the kids a lifetime and on and on. You've just got to 
go because we're simply not going to tell it all here. 
You're going to love this one - what a treasure - house of 
Christmas gifts. Maybe even one for yourself! 









Country Heriti^te offers a wide variety of home ac- 
cessories iind dwor that are functionid and attractive. 



Bring Your Family 

ToMeet 

Our Family.,, 

Holidays are 

a family affair 

atEdie Adam$. 

We have styling 

choices for everyone 

aiid for all ages! 



PredsioB Profcftrioiial 
Haircnts Pcmu 

»5.45 '12.95 Bp 



I'^E.UHlcOrMtRd. 
5W-9093 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9-9Tli«iBday 



173 S. Lfrnttmiftm Pkwy. 
46t-<3M 



bfu bnx:d.*:.: = 



leaocisq a fans j:,>. 



Have A Decorating Idea? 

Send it to: Th* WomM't Vl«w 

P.O. Box 1327 
Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



S39IilBtopPlnn 
42S-M97 



tSVTAabwaDr. 
OMMt 



4«tl-ESlMraJ)r. 
4M4333 



AlwSSaloulB 
Newport News wad Hamptoa 

NO APPOINTMENTS 
COME IN AT YOUR CONVENIENCE 



Custom bedroom furniture that b hand made and hand 
rubbed with an oil flnish that says, "They Care." 

Christmas Shopping 

The Most Unlikely Place. . . 

it is inconceivable to me that anyone would think of 
going to Polynesian Pools on Virginia Beach Blvd. in 
Virginia Beach for... Christmas gifts and decorations, 
but, my know-it-all neighbor did just that last week. She 
can sniff out a bargain and And a "real-deal" in the 
most unlikely places one can imagine. 

If you're in the dark On whwe to go for those special 
gifts and ornaments and holiday decor... just join a lot 
of your friends there and you'll see what I mean. 

Owners Jack Slawson and Thomas Sharpe decided 
they'd try something really different in the slow winter 
months (when folks aren't exactly knocking down the 
doors to buy a swimming pool, Polynesian, or any other 
style for that matter). A little Christmas Wonderland, 
chock full of artificial trees by Mister Christmas, impor- 
ted gifts, ornaments, nutcrackers, candles and lots more 
offers a nice variety... (from some very nice people you 
ordinarily visit in spring and summer)... Now, you have 
an excuse to stop and shop in winter too (not that you 
need one). 




10 DISCOUNT WITH AD 



627-6238 



ANTIQUES 



UMuTD. 



,Y> S 






2 LocatfoBs To Serve Yo« 
Hilhop Square 
(NexttoK-Man) 



660eVa.BeKhBlv4. 

(East of Newtown Road.) 
4Cl-tlll 




A Renaissance Center in Norfolk 

FKATliRINC;: 

IIIMIUlll-:. IIANIM-RAI''l1>3t(l|l|tlVI1IV nVMtH 
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iMMn Imparl BonM^m • Vtmm tMNcli 

Bashcia • Vlalaie OoIMhii • GqwwI ft'M* 

Cafe • CoIIccHMm • All A PaMcfy 

Km* Much. MMch Mimll 

HOURS: 

Mun., Tucit., Wed. and Sal. - lOa.ai. -tp.*. 
IhiirNday and I'rlda) - 10 a.a. - 9 p.n. 

A l.initeriHK Sfutft/HHK Ijc/ieriemv 
Thai TranMvmla Time. 

2ted ami Onokandro Ave., Norftrfk 

(IktockonCmibySl.) 

CiNirtety Parkh« - Chesapeake Auto Sup^ 



T&L Casuals 




495^275 



1029 PrpTMen^ StUMA Stopping Center 
IKniptVme^idScctfoii 



•Gifts 
•Furniture 
•Crystal 
•Wicker 
•Antiques 
And Collectibles 




THIS & THAT 




525 North Birdneck Rd. 
(Birdn^k Shopinng Center) 

422-3225 



/e've Got Your Stylel 

Perms, Cotors, Cuts & So Much Moref 



NOWOPENI 

CWmney HIMs Shopf^ng Center 

86 » Chimney Hills Snopptng Center 
340^516 






LINGERIE mUTIQUE, ltd 



■ii# ranwy IMbtiif iti *" 



V '0nl« s Larfest Hi*- Care Oimpar^ 



BALLO(»®»GIFTS»PLANTS 
'^omem^SixdalForSonwoneSpedal" 

CALL US: 4(i3-2(S38 

HEtaiM HT^ 333.1 Ptmxm Ane P^ 
Store m Virginia Beach, Va. 2M52 




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ioaassy, 

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^5.3041 
Hn. 10: •.n.-MOp.n. Mon.-SM. 



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-¥i^^^^m m m m M m <» • 9 1 m n «»■ m jn ■^- 



^^s^gi^^^mjm^'i im 11 viivmmmm^immi 



•ippip^^ 



Virginia B«tth Sun. November 17. 1982 9 



/V' 



<fc' 



The Woman's View 



Notes To My Friends ... 




. . . and all these dogs have 
problems, too. 

May 7, 1981 

In the mail today were 
several inquiries about 
by Irish setter Murphy 
and how he's faring on 
the farm at Elam. 

One writer complained 
of not being broughtup to 
date on Murphy lately; 
and another sent hii& Im 
aerial map of Elam, in 
my care, which I ap- 
preciate since it does 
confirm the existence of 
Elam. 

So, in the face of 
another attack of 
jealousy on the part of 
Joe's dog Ahab, here's a 
Murphy report. 

Murphy is prospering. 

He's given up chasing 
ducks, cars and chickens 
completely; he still 
chases an occasional cat, 
but he hasn't caught one 



yet and they like to climb 
trees anyway.. 

He loves to chase rab- 
bits and» considering 
their appetite for garden 
peas, we have not tried 
to discourage this habit. 

I'm sorry to rqport 
that Murphy was feeling 
poorly last week. 

Our vet. Doc Taylor, 
said he had tonsillitis, 
gave us some pills and 
told us to give Murphy 
chicken soup. Murphy 
wasn't too thrilled about 
the (Mils, but he took 

them, and he liked the 
idea of the chicken soup 
just fine. 

He liked it so well, in 
fact, that he snuck into 
the kitchen and ap- 
propriated a chicken that 
had been programmed as 
a family dinner. 

We didn't dis(»)v«- the 
theft until too late. But 
it was nke to know that 
Murphy had his ai^tite 
back. 

May 21, 1981 

I was made to feel a 
little better about the 
herd of dogs we have at 
Elam today. We Iiave 
four, all sort of rescued 
in one way or anotho*. 

Fifi was found aban- 
doned at a service station 
by a friend who realized 

immediately that we 
needed such a dog. 

Spanky was adopted 
when another friend 



promised one of her 
friends to find Spanky a 
home. Stranger just 
showed up one day 
several yfars ago and 
never got around to 
leaving. 

And Murphy, our 
Irish setter, was adopted 
after another friend took 
pictures of him at the 
shelter. 

We buy dog food in 
fifty-pound bags. 

Anyway, Chet Rid- 
dick, one of our 
engineers, was driving 
me out to Suffolk today 
to speak to the Rotary 
Club. But first we had 
to drop by his house to 
sec Benjy. 

Seems Chet got Benjy 
sort of the same way I 
got my bunch. 

This friend had a 
friend who was about to 
move away and couldn't 
take Benjy, and would 
Chet uke him. And 
Chet, being a nice guy. 
and an animal lover, and 
having several acres 
around his house for 
Benjy to share with his 
other dogs... well, sure, 
after all we all know that 
Benjies are fuzzy little 
dogs about so high, seen 
'em on television. 

Well sir, this par- 
ticular Benjy is fuzzy all 
right, and lovable, all 
one hundred eighty-five 
pounds of him. 

Who'd ever guess that 
anybody would name a 
St. Bernard Benjy? 



This series of excerpts from "Notes To My Friends" is brought to you through 
the courtesy of The DonidBg CoBpaay, a local publishing firm, and Jim Kin- 
caid. The book is available in njost book stores. 



The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 




In preparing for an enjoyable full course meal for 
someone special you always say, "I don't know for sure 
what kind of bread would go best with all this." Weil it 
doesn't have to be that way and I hope you will keep 
these recipes below to use in your home. 
Cheesy Cranbcrty Bread 

Flour 2 cups 

Sugar 1 cap 

Baking powder Vz tbsp. 

Salt Vi ttep. 

Baking soda Va tap. 

Egg, beaten 1 each 

Orange, Jaice Va cup 

Lemon rind, grated ; ... 1)6 tbsp. 

Vegetable oil 3Vi cup 

Cranberries 2 cups 

Cheese, cheddar, shredded Vi cap 



In a mixing bowl, sift to^tho^ all the dry ingredients. 
In another smaller bowl, carabine beaten egg, orgsse 
juice, lemon rind, and v^etable oil; mix thoroughly. 
Make a well in the center of dry ingredimts. Pour in egg 
mixture and mix until dampened, then fold in cran- 
berries, nuts, and cheese. Pour into a well greased 
baking pan. Bake 45 minutes to 1 hour, at 350*. 



Bacony Cora Bread 

Conuneal 1 Va cups 

Flour, ail purpose V2 cup 

Bukiag Powdor 2 tap. 

Sugar 2 Up. 

SiUt lUp. 

B^dDg Soda V2 tsp. 

&uH>n fat ^4 cup 

Bacon, crisply cooked, crunriried 6 slices 

Buttermilk 1 Vz cups 

E^, beaten 2 each 

Preheat oven to 425*. In a medium size bowl, inix 
together all ingredients, beating quite well until mixed 
thoroughly. Pour into a greased baking pan and bake 
for 24 to 29 minutes. Serves up to 12. 

I hope you enjoy this week's recipes as much as I do 
and don't forget to submit your redpes, for our contest 
for the best recipe on a holiday desert or holiday gateau 
(cake). 

I bid you a good day from The Uprooted Gourmet. 




Home RemecUes Add 
To Sodium Content 

The American Medical 
AMociation and the Food 
and Drug Administration 
(FDA) are encouraging food 
processors to include sodi- 
um content information on 
food p^kaging labels. 

In a recent issue of 
the Journal of the AMA, 
the FDA's Commissioner, 
Arthur H. Hayes, Jr., MD, 
states that "many patients 
with mild high blood pres- 
sure diow a significant re- 
duction in their blood pres- 
sure with a reduced sodium 
intake." 

Watching your salt in- 
take often presents a prob- 
lem because of the "hidden 
salt" in processed foods, 
fast foods, canned and fro- 
zen foods, bakery products 
and a number of non- pre- 
scription medications pur- 
chased in drug stores or 
supermarkets. 



Corner Cottage 

Life-Long Ambition Realized 




Happy Marriage: True Or False? 



husband andiwife islKnVKi^to weaken. 

I TRUE...... FALSE...... 

6. A man or woman of forty cannot be 
as attractive is a boy or girl of twenty. 



Both from a scientific and a personal 
^dpoint. the chief, x#Jfi,S|.^f,tt8t is 
this: It enables a person to compare his 
relevant attitudes with those of others, 
and to find what his level would be in the 
group from which the score is standar- 
dized. It is interesting— although, not 
necessarily significant — to note that of 
the married persons achieving a score 
above the mean of the tested group, 69 
per cent stated that their marriages were 
"happy." 

Directions-lf on the whole you agree 
with a statement, check TRUE. IF you 
disagree with a statement or feel that it is 
doubtful, check FALSE. 

1 . There is no use worrying toa much 
about whether or not your marriage will 
work out, because if worse comes to 
worst you can always get a divorce. 

TRUE...... FALSE 

2. A happy mvria^ requires husband 
and wife to have similar intvests. 

TRUE FALSE../... 

3. A happy marriage requires 
economic s«:urity. 

TRUE FALSE course more than once a week. 

4. A woman is incapable of as intense TRUE FALSE 

a physical love as a man. 13. Children do more to hurt a 

TRUE. FALSE marrii^e than to hdp it. 

5. After a number of years of TRUE FALSE...... 

marriage, the attraction between 14. An erring wife is more at fault 



TRUE FALSE to love two men at the same time. 

7. A man and woman cannot be close TRUE FALSE 

friends in the true sense cf the word. 16. Marriages are generally happi^t 

TRUE FALSE when husband and wife entertain as few 

8. Unless strong sexual attraction per- friends and relatives a possible. 
sists between husband and wife, their 

marriage will generaUy go on the rocks TRUE FALSE 

sooner or later. 17. The more a couple stays at home 

TRUE FALSE instead of going around to parties and 



than an erring husband,.^ 23. Marriage is noble in a senw, 

TRLIE FALSE. because (check one): 

15. It is possible for a man to love two 
women at the san^e time, or for a woman 



9. To be really considerate, and in or- 
der not to make a mockery of love, 
husband and wife should set apart cer- 
tain definite times for sex. 

TRUE FALSE 

10. It is all right for a person to 
b^me sexually involved with someone 
else, as long as his or ha affection and 
interest do not become involved. 

TRUE FALSE 

11. Marriages are happiest when one 
partner is always willing to acquiesce in 
the wishes of the otho-. 

TRUE FALSE 

12. A couple should not have inter- 



affairs, the more chance they have to be 
happy. 



18. 



TRU^ FALSE becomes unhappy 



a. It is sanctified by God 

b. It insures continuation of the race. , . 

c. It can provide ideal companionsliip 
between a man and woman 

24. In most really happy marriages, the 
husband keeps business affairs out of the 
hofne and does not discuss them with his 
wife. , 

TRUE FALSE 

25. If a wife achieves greater social, 
professional or economic success than 
the husband, the marriage eventually 



Love is a game. 

TRUE...... FALSE 

1 9. Love is a deadly serious matter. 

TRUE FALSE 

2Q.^ For a truly happy marriage, the 
man' should be able to make himself 
helpful around the hous^m such matters 
as fixing shelves or leaky faucets— and 
the woman should be able to cook good, 
wholesome meals. 

TRUE...... FALSE 

21. Husband and wife should always 
spend their vacations together. 

TRUE FALSE 

22. If husband and wife want to spend 
an evening or two away from each other 
occasionally, it's perfectly all right. 

TRUE FALSE 



TRUE FALSE. 





asiva CI 


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asivaii 


(3) iZ 


anni oi 


HflHl TZ 


asivj -6 


3S1VJIZ 


asivj 8 


aSTVH Qfl 


asivj -L 


asivj -61 


asivj 9 


3S1VJ 81 


asivj 5 


asivj 'L\ 


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asivj 91 


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asivjsi 


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asivdi 



vJENN-AIR 



• 



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According to Mrs. Kathy Offield, owner of the Cor 
ner Cottage in Virginia Beach, "My lifelong ambition! 
was realized when we opened this fascinating little 
shop." Kathy, who comes from a large family (one of j 
eleven children), opened the business on the sixth of! 
January, 1982. Mrs. Offield was born in Kempsville and^ 
attended Kempsville High School, but lives in the Den- 
bigh area at present. She stated, "we are looking for a 
home here in Virginia Beach to be near our business and 
many friends in the area." 

"This is truly a family and friend business Mrs. Of- 
field stated. "My husband comes in after work and 
maintains the books and ray mother, who is 84, loves to 
come by just to talk with our friends." 

Having distinct colonial flare inside, this fascinating 
shop truly offers something for everyone. Baldwin 
Brass, to light your Thanksgiving table, table settings 
and place mats for that special holiday touch, florals in 
silk for every decor, and the Corner Cottage specializes 
in weddings. "My most proud possession is our wed- 
ding florals, church floral arrangements and special 
touch gifts, but, I have to say the kitchen is the warmest 
room of all," said Mrs. Offield. 

Everything from linen towels to cookie cutters of 
every imaginable shape, and even a chopping block for 
yotttChrijitmaK bu:d.Muskj)pJt£S. ^iQ]:si£ Rockwell or 
a Roman nativity scene filithe table rqps ,* artd, a most 
unique touch, a babies for adoption section (the dolls), 
the Babyland General. They have the prized Xavier 
Roberts signature and adoption papers, folks ! 

You can make your holidays warm and special with 
Clare Burke fragrance or one of a large selection of 
scented candles. 

Drop by and visit Kathy and tier mom, her friend, Carol 
Lee Foster, niece, Patsy Kidd and sister Marie Tuttle. 
You'll probably meet some of your own friends there too. 





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•Program Recall feature reminds you 
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*.- u t^ «.ii^>w9VViiV^VHi!Vi^^ni^i««v^^i^i^i«p9«iv^iw^iwv^i^i^^^p^ 



is' 



I 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 



St, 



Student Creative Writing, Art 



i ■» 



The following material has been selected from 
i^ous sources to present a partial picture of the 



typa of writing, and expressions which have been 
written by Virginia Beach students: 



The Oreai Jtmerieein Past time 





Bernard Conda 



Much has been written about the psychological 
traumas that are an inherent part of first dates. 
Having been on several myself, I can claim to be 
somewhat of an expert on vyhat is, for your 
average guy, the most strenuous part of high 
school life. 

Possibly the most excruciating period for the 
neophyte suitor is finding a suitable girl to aslc 
out. Suitable usually implies three things: looks, 
reputation, and availability. It must be said that 
she doesn't have to be a raving beauty, but she 
does have to look enough like a female to preserve 
the guy's reputation a^ a lady killer, not an animal 
assassin. Reputation transcends personality; the 
young lady must be kind, considerate, amiable, 
and not dating every other guy in the school. 
Finally, the girl must be available, not dating the 
middle linebacker on the football team. This is 
estremely important to basic cowards like myself 
who intend to live through their senior year. 

One would think that after asking a girl out, the 
difficult part was over. In actuality, the agony 
continues if the girl accepts. After deciding upon a 
time to pick her up, the youngster pulls up in front 
of her house in his muddy Pinto, hops out of his 
car and proceeds, knees shaking, to enter the 
lion's den and meet her father. The first basic type 
of father is the tall ex-Marine drill sargeant with 
vice grip fingers who promises a slow and painful 
death if his little girl is as much as breathed upon. 
Father-type two is the short, hunchbacked, 
depraved fellow who is constantly rubbing his ,, 
l^ds and,entr^eatiM.yqi^ tQ,^aye a^pr. tijjje^n*- / 
hurry Back soon, heli, heh, heh. Moih told me that 
all girls' fathers were the benign type found in 
"Father Know's Best," but I have never met such 
a man. _:,,.,^^ 

When the football gamie is over, the merry 
couple returns, signalling the start of yet another 
crisis. Debating whether to say goodnight, shake 



T'j 




All Alone Again 

Here I am, 

all alone again, 
separated from 

the world. 



an outcast 

detM;hed from life, 
left to become 

a hermit, 
made to b«:ome 

independent. 

They rebuke me, 

saying I'm diffo'ent. 
But what is 

bdng different? 
To DM, it is just 
bdng myself. 

Helen HoUoway, 1981 
ftrandon JunicH' Hi^ School 



Haiku 

faito « eooi, rtiQ^ ■«, 
tte ran disippinn. 

Mike Regal, 
ftmiMton Junior H^ School 



hands, or actually kiss the girl, the lad remembers 
the considerable sum of money he has spent and 
becomes bound and determined to steal a good- 
night kiss. After deliberating whether or not to 
close his eyes, the debonair chap leans over and 
gives out the most passionate kiss of his life. This 
really boosts his pride until he realizes that he has 
slobbered all over the girl's nose— maybe he'll 
keep his eyes open next time. Fearing the 
inevitable the lad prqjares to leave, but it is too 
late; she immediately asks him to come into the 
house for a minute. He tries to avoid it — my God 
it's 10:15 and he's exhausted— but it's all in vain. 
One look in those big brown eyes and out of the 
car he steps, making that oh-so long, trip up the 
driveway. The house has invisible eyes; any 
minute the feared searchlights and machine guns 
could light him up and cut him down. The 
family's pack of Dobermans begins to howl. 
When he walks in Mom is reading her Bible by the 
fire and Dad is loading his shotgun. He talks 
about the fine night he had (but not too fine there 
Dad, and uh, could you point that shotgun 
f somewhere else, please, sir). At last he l^ves, but 
^.unfortunately the Dobermans have chewed 
« through^eir leashes and are chasing him back to 
the car. 

Escaping the Dobermans with only a few scrat- 
ches and bites, our typical male finally heads 
home. Upon arrival he takes a cold shower, 
because the disappointing goodnight kiss was the 
highlight of his evening. Despite aU the trauma he 
has experienced, om ,tjppSiC9S n)a|e .(eeniisai.it, 
resolves to continue his adventures «s a novice ' 
John Travolta in the weeks to come, for he can't 
forsake the thrills, of the Great American Past- 
time, j , 

John Skif fington. 

Montage '82 

Kempsviile High School 

Haiku 

Frigid Arctic night, 
moonlight glimmering on iee^ 
Shaggy huskies sleep. 

Debbie Breed, 
Brandon Junior High School 



Touching 

When you touch 

someone's heart, 

it is not 

with fingers or hands, 

but with love, 

peace, 

happiness, 

joy, 

caring, 

sharing, 

giving - 

all the things 

which fill 

the human spirit 

with rejoicii^. 



Grandfather 

I have oftoi wondered 
how Ik can be so 

contented 

sitting in the same 

time-worn chair 

day by day. 

In 

his antique hands 

are onion-skin 

monwiM 

whkh . 

have faded to a shade 

of jaundice color 

found somewhere ovct a 

cobwebbed rainbow. 

Here Im sits 
reading back issues of 
TIME- 
the only thne grandfather 
knows of now. 
He 
offers me a T. V. dinner; 
I accept. 
We enjoy 
a simple meal together 
as he tells me 
Ufe 
didn't always taste 
so good, 
and yet, 
through aU his eighty years, 
grandfather 
c«n still offer this world 
a smile. 
With it, 
all generation ptps melt. 
Thank ytm, grandfather, 
foroihancing 
the flavor of 
TV. dinners... 
and life. 

Brenda Burke, 1981 
Brandon Junior High School 



tJntitled 






Mi 



A lighthouse on a lonely cape 
that shfaies a constant beaoa into the emptiness, 
The northwest wind that walks barefoot 
throui^ my hair. 

Cones back again... agi|hi.,.andagito„ , ,. r , 
/ Chip Flynn, 

v^ I Kellam High School 



'i ''Jtt'^ 



'1-4 



Broken Heart 

1 walk slowly along the bMch. 
I button my coat 
to shield my aching heart 
from the cold winds. 

1 look ov« the choppy waves. 
I wondo* if 1 can waUc 
on U» shimmering path that 
the moon makn on the water. 
I ^t dowm on a lonely rock. 

I dnw In^ken h«uts 
in the cold, yeUow sand. 
I brush my tears away. 
I wondo' why 
love has to hurt 
somudi. 



Brenda Burke, \990 
Brandon Juniin- High School 




Rkky Tompkins, 1981 
Brandon Junior High School 



Frustrated 



I am so Frustrated. I 
can't think of-a thing 
to write. 

I hate to do things whoi 
I can't do them. I always 
feel like just putting my 
h«ul on the desk and 
having myself a good, loi^ 
cry. 

Why is it that 1 can't 
1^ my brain just go free and 
think about things it never 
tlK>ught before? 

I pMtt I'm jiut afraid to 
think. 

Oftm I think of tMn^ Uw 
«^ere did God cMne fr^? «■ 
«Hm« will I go whffl I dhr? 
TM^p that aren't rally 
uece^uy. but I'm mly htmaii. 

Aude kfcOonald, 1910 
fcawkw Ju^m- High S^o<ri 



Waves 

ftunnlns along an 
endlnsbMch, 

Wnva cnidi upon 
therocks-^hatare 
w^edintbesalt 
ofqrfrit. 

1%e son risa, like 
a dimdbnnt of lu^ tea. 

And s^ <m tte otho- 
side, oeMling dmni In 

a MHIfBI QMOt. 

lt't<IUikKNr;Irit 
an^ii^ 

Porte tf^^y^w 
of Ae moMi to wppami. 

flowlyitrtoMand 
ciMs bidf <» tlw n|» 
ofttewn^, 

Va^Of for the Mi&ana 
oftt«oe«w. 



Kim l&rald. 1981 
ftnidon Jttdor H^ StAocrt 



Fishoman's Dream 

I can see my gruidfather and me on an un- 
touehed lake with tlM sun rising peacefully in the 
b^kgrouhd. I can almost he$x my grandfather 
npfring his eolYee. 

Ronnie Sears, 
Brandon Junior High School 



Bassin' 

On brisk mornings, when the tog is just lifting 
fr(mi the WK^, my siu-face lure plo|M in by the 
submerged tt«M. I^e i^ug settled, I feel the blast 
of excitement, the fio'ce fish btusting through the 
sitfCace, tlmisting its head back uid forth. Hien, 
with all its energy, it cuts tlu-ough the branches, 
trying to oitangle itself. Using au my strength, 1 
rip him out and tire him, fecdii the triumph as I 
Uft him out <rf^the glassy water fato my bass bcMit. 
Afto- the waghing and the pictures, I feel proud 
to let him go. Because the monster gave me 
ideasure, I let him go to thrive onw more. 

Peter Marino, 
Brandon Junior High School 

Untitled 

My feelings are like 

a soft, soaring dove, 

floating and fluttaing 

into the blue. 

My mind Is like 

a powerful shark, 

biting down on its prey, 

locking it in to swallow 

whatever gets caught. 

MyheartisUke 

the graceful gliding 

of a swan 

swimming nlently towards 

the end of time. 

But what am I? 

I am God's own, 

His most beautiful 

creation. 



CharissaMitcheU, 
Brandon Junior High School, 



Longings 



Long pieces 

of yarn 

for my kitten, 

long horse rides 

on a trail 

through the woods, 

long spiral curls and 

long velvet ribbons, 

long periods of 

time for dreaming, 

long gowns and 

flat ballerina shoes, , 

long walks 

with a friend 

on tlw seashore, 

long,^RMaaiiticbo(du: -i h >' : 

for raiilydiQ'ki''''^'' "'nfii«'inf ir tn ■;. 

long-ladling memories 

of good times, 

long talks 

with someone 

who loves 

and cares. 



''yrj rptO'Tf'^ 



Mich^eM«-cer, 
Brandon Junior High School, 1982 



Epitaph 



I, a windblown seed, come now finally to rest 

My roots have grown deq> in days past 

Ctoly to be rinied violently 

From the security they had found. 

Butltfnokto-jww 

And my roots grow hard and thi^ 

In the comp(»t of dead drett&s 

And the asj^aticms of (tod m«i. 

DirkDeRolf, 
Kemi»ville High Sdux>l 



Like Wind 

He moves like the wind 
Chasii^, turning, spuming 
He comes closer but then- 
He moves away 
His feelings are cokl Mid brisk 
He shares nothing 

He takes~as the wind takes the leava 
Quickly without thou^ 
He cares not, protect noone 
Heis- 
Akine. 

Marilyn Samla-lin, 
Cox High School 




A Wave 



h&aHmotm brada tte so^ty 

as a flo«^ i^irfe emeiiei. 

It grdwv. beeei^ pOT^M. 

the anm, M kpiirtti be iiea, 

N» ben MMMtfir the WMr's b<Mmty. 

The ««v»'t Jw^ne Hp ^Kb « dM ^b 

Hien, n If to Mbt a new Hfot k fla^ need^ 

»ta«ie^pMMs. 



■ft 



iM 



■WplV^piMM 



^KW! 



m 




Paralyzed 



Fish 

Swimming around, 
never knowing feet on ground, 
up ind d<mn Uie 0»u, 
wondering what's tx^ond, 
wet all the time, 
feeling no wannth, just cold, 
' feeding on dry food 
flaked in hard pieces, 
always watching, 
curiously, fearfully. 



-^iOW4W" 



swimming through rising bubbles 
and hollow castles, 
swimming ever on, 
never shutting an eye, 
always watching the outside, 
fearful of shadows 
and flickering lights, 
fleeing all new things, 
endlessly watching. 

Bailey Teague, 
Brandon 3\xmor High School, 1982 



From neck to toe he cuuot feel 
The needle which penetntfes hitskin. 
Nor the Ught caress of my hand 
As it movM along the strech of his arm. 
Forever, they say, it wiU be this way. 

Still, streched flat on the bed, 

He Iks like a mummy wrapped in medkind slwets, 

Or like an insect petrified by amber 

As hel{dess to claw, to fight.. .to move. 

Forever, they say, it will be this way. 

Hii tears, as well as mine, have long been dried 
By a frosty wind that rendnds me of the season. 
But it would be just as well if I did not know. 
For thwe will be no frolicking in snow with red 

glowing cheeks. 



Dream 

Air weaves and rises from the tiles 
Of a baked-clay jdaza; 
I walk without movement. See, 
There she sits, aloM, by a fountain. 
I know her, but don't know how. 

I draw nearer, she sees me. 
She does not know me; I am not 
The one she has met, bitf another. 
And still the same. She leans forward. 
She will say something. I will not wait. 



Her eyes shoot a question 1 ignore. 
With no volition, no will, 
I pull from my suit-jacket pocket a gun. 
And without sound, she dies. 

I restore the giin to his place 

And walk back , slowly. 

Against an empty plaza full of people 

Feeling nothing but awareness that 

I have killed 

And felt nothing. 

Frances Blair, 
Cox High School 



TTioughts Of Slim Whitman 

Slim 

we love you 

yodel 

for us 

Just for us 

Wooooo 

Just for you 

Listen, slim 

in the yard 

a flower / 

talks to me 

It knows life 

It only lives 

Wooooo 

Just for you 

Oh,andVlcki 

but she was 18 

she doesn't have your record 

she doesn't have a stereo 

they burned 

along with her house 

Wooooo 

Just for you 

David Williams 
Green Run High School 



Vi^ia Beach Sun, November 17, 1!^ 1 1 

Fomvff . th^ My, it Witt be this way. 

No, there will be no loof walks in the »ow In irinter. 
He win aeva feel the tiiu^ of the to as it s^» 

in thrmigh his booa, 
(^ hi fiunmer the frt^ green oonm as it swe^ 

thesand 
C3ean fnMn the b^to of Us toes. 
Forev0, they f^. It will be ttds way. 

I h«tf a Aunt ^ fiKMn the bed nouty. 
I look M Uffl mt lee «^ I win alwaj^ see- 
the broken Uy of his back want to turn ova-. 
I muA to and fOO Mm to the other side of lus worid, 
Wh^ forever wiU be miM. 

AUzaKatz, 

Montage '82, 

Kraipsville High School 

Untitled 

Years ago. when my father was 

overseas, he had two portraits made 

of his wife's parmts. When my 

grandfather died, his wife ronoved , 

Chie of tlM portraits from the waU 

and carefully utored it, shrouded 

ia tissue, in her sewing room. 

Now. every year on their anniversary, 

she skmrly unwn^M the jncture and cries. 

KatrinaEike, 
Bayside High Sdiool 

A Shoe 

I lie in the prison of my room shrowded in 

darkness 

released from my torture of the day before 

untfl the rays of impending doom break the 

window pane 

again I wUI be strained 

my arms wiU be laced and puUed through the 

pores of my face tin my tongue lies flat 

the sHmey cruel masseur of my soul 

forces his way into my body only to beat 

me against whatever Ues in his path 

until I am thrown into my prison of 

darkness awaiting the next session with pain. 

Steve Long, 
First Colonial High School 



I 



i;iJ/fmi>us''il 



Mirrors AJid Knights 



That's this fact about mirrors. If you look in , 
one, you see someone else. I have never figured 
out how to avoid this. Here l:4Ba»i4iriciMit,^M ! 
pattidan, pottcuor of an mfectious smilet^fttfor^ ^ >^ 
life dancing in my eya - and there^looldng back at 
me, is this - nobody. 

I'm the kind of po-son teachers p^ at quiz- 
zically week after week. Ymi would think they 
were trying to get used to bifocals, but actually 
they can't remember who I am. SonMtimes I think 
the only thing between me and fading away is my 
mascara. 

If you don't recaU my face, you'll never forget 
my name: SaUy Wirth. your cmnmon, or garden 
variety, high school fonale. 

Normally my days are as Ufeless as my hair. But 
on Fridays I share a litoury tahk with Caroline 
and Doug. You know Ctac^ac. She's beautiful 
and $raart and head cheerleader. There's a 
Caroline in evoy school for the rest of us to envy. 
But Doug is H)eciai. I am sue he wiU be a private 
(tetective, unkss he has senates, in which case 
he'U get a st«;k of Nobd prias fw nncer cures. 
Doug and OvoUne are two diamonds. Think of 
measariiineitone. 

I Uke Friday. I sit aaross fr«n Doug and ad- 
mire. Last FHday we woe working on our EngUsh 
t»m jmper. I ^n» (bring mhw on early American 
po^. a ta^ i^ildi 1^ your mu^ wander. My 
mind had wanderad ovo' to ]>oug and the Ring 
Dance that wu omnhig up. The Doup of this 
workl do not ask &Uys to Ring l^mces. but «4iat 
is the Ubrary for if not for daydreaming? 

Cu-oline's miiul had stnyed. too. "Wwldn't 
you Uke to know your IQ?" she asked. 

Of course C^rdiM wanted to know her IQ, Uke 
a diammd iKM^»ing how many carats it is. 

"No, I wottldn*t«" I saM firmly. 

"You could fhid out for us," QvoUne per- 
sisted. 

Doug looked me over cardulfy, as if he were 
^ii^ wmi^Ung at a garage sale. I hop^ my 
chari ffn a wm shining out of my featweless face. 
"Yeah," he said. •'SlMoould." 

On Mondijv I wwk hi tlw guidance office. 
Dead End Du^?. the m^on odl it. My task 
requKS c<msidenri^ eqietise. I type labels and 
oento' th«n on t<Men, Cmteiim Is vey impor- 
tant in tim ^iMaiMe t^tee. Much uMwe imswrtant 
ttiaa. My, eoUem plae^Mnt. Amfl)o^ can fill out 
oott^ ai^eatieni < laMlook at Mr. Tl^tw - but 
how nniiy petite ^ reaUy emtst a labd? 

"Do^ OhVtftiUyT" OvoHne asked. 

CarottM ahnqn^iW &m^ i^B$teton mtm. 
"DoiAat?**luked. 

"Look V9 om IQ'i," the repeated carefiily, 
n^wiiMi a ^^^1 ^lAmi^ tees ome, 

"Ttat's mi^ibg," I huMed. 

"Not if m ftve yon pmmi^on to ^ in iwr 
recOTito, it im't." OuoHne said. "R^t, Doug?" 

"Sun. Come m, ^ilb^. Look *em up for us. 
Ptease?" 

Mm ScM^ak wm poimi to mmA mtm mi- 
om^^ taUdi^ 1^^ am i^mm of itavfes 
i^n vee^ k ^sMy^ CMCMraged, Imt Mto 
§a^<tale, I an sure, sps^ 1^ lurch homt 
maUttg onm-^bAeA S*I«L*B*N*C*B* sign. 

"No." I n^te«d» I tocric M^ quickly. 

"Why «<?" Cte^Mne asked peevisMy. 

"Mr^ Taylor m^ lee me." 

"l^nn. te's a gaWMwe ccwMdor," Doug 






broke in. "You could spend att day dismembeHhg ^^f' 
corpses, and he wouldn't notice."' ' " ' ^^^^ 

"Doug is right." CaroUne said decisivel)l^'^<>^rtj 
"Next Monday !pdk'ii>bWIQ^.»»''"*'^'^ ^^^^ "«'°^ 

"Libt^^iie'nat where you got to plot mur- 
ders," Miss Scarsdak admonished. 

I cringed. Doug looked remote and CaroUne 
looked thoughtful. After a minute of silence, we 
began writing notes. CaroUne started with, "Do 
it, SaUy Wirth. It's a requirement." Doug added, 
"Please?" 

My reply was, "Forget it." For Dou^ I would 
become Wonder Woman. For dairblhie and Doug, 
I would only get in the way. I got up, and Doug 
foUowed me. "Come on, SUly;^' he whispered. 
"Please? Look in our files." 

"Well...." 

"Please?" Those warm brown eyes of his 
bUhked at me. 

"Maybe." 

"Thanks a mUUonl" Doug ex^Udmed just after 
we had rnssed through the d6i(Mf.''^bvious^ when 
Doug's mom says "Maybe" s^i ifteans "yes." He 
kissed me on the cheek and strode back to 
CaroUne before I had time to tell him that when 
my mom says "maybe" she means "no." 

On down the h^ and into the foyer my mind 
drifted to spring dances, spring kiiiei, and Doug. 
All weekend I saw CaroUne and not me in my 
mirror. 

On Monday whUe working with Bob York in 
the office, I told him about their request. 

"TTiey know what's in their files," he snorted. 
' 'They just want it verified . " 

"I know. But Doug is going to take me to the 
Cremi DeUte." 

"Without CaroUne? Do you have that in 
writing?" 

"Oh.Bob.HonesUy!" 

"They're using you, SaUy." 

"I know. But I Uke Doug." 

"Doug comes in a pair." 

Mr. Taylor busUed by. "SaUy, Bob."' he said. 
"There's work to be done. " 

I had been busy about ten minutes when Mr. 
Taylor hurumped. "Got to run om: to tlw 
technical school. New approitice prograitis. Be 
back shortly." 

"We'U hold the fort." Bob said. 

The door draed, a«l Bob ami I were kft al<Hie 
with 6,000 fil«. TlMre an only 1,863 stiktenu, but 
guidance is into cr<^-i%fa'aidi^. You never 
know what may be useful . 

"You shouldn't, you know," Bob warmd. 

"J know." I gravitated tommed tte fite cabins. 
WhoK should I do first? Doug's? CaraUiw's? Or 
nw^^mtne? 

"I have a jmvcsal for 3«w," ]&4> sakl. 

"Two in OM week," I marv^d. 

"I'U take you to the Cmni Ddite. Ymi stay mit 
of tte files." 

"You yring to teU if I te it?" 

"Nope. But jNMi'iT gerii^ to be w»Ty." 

"Wlqr?" 

"Because ymi're too h<mest. %^l^ would be 
branded into your consciemx foreve." 

"Good pief." I sMNted. 1 i^rtod with my 
drawer: "W-Wo." "Wirth. Sa^ lue. Ferade." 

I fA a ti^^. Here in tUs i^^|A»oiit fol(kr 
wae all ray ^voi uid a talf years hi t^o^. 
Right on t(9 was a ral«l ste^ fhMU my favwte 



ninth-grade teacher. 1 scooped it up and read 
aloud: "Sally is a nice, average girl: the 
dverachiever who maintians her grades by deter- 
minatiM^rMherihtlh byeSiUty.'* 
I pttf th« foidtir IMck without reading any more. 
"YOU kh^w what an overachiever is. Bob?" l) 
snapped.' "SCMtieohe who is too dumb to know she 
is dumb." 

"Aw, Sally. It'is just guidance stuff. Means 
nothfag." ' 

"Overiachiaver,'' I thought. "Average." I couU 
see some dreary creature sitting in a Ubrary trying 
to soak up a few more drops of knowledge into 
her little brain, and it was me. 

"WeU," Bob said, "at least it says you're 
nice." 

"Nice!" I huffed. "What kind of adjective is 
nice? Where are the really good adjectives, Uke 
vivacious??? 

Bob nodded. "I always wanted to be 
charismatic." 

"Right, or voluptuous. Just once in my Ufe, at 
just <Hie thing, I'd Uke to be right at the top of the 
sdUe." 
Bob didn't say anything. 
"I'm back," Mr. Taylor caUed cheerfuUy. 
"Three o'clock. Workday's over." He swept us 
out the rear exit. 

"So where are Doug and Cartrfine?" Bob 
asked. "I thought they'd be saUvating hoe at the 
door waiting for the news." 

"They're waiting for me at the Cremi DeUte. " 

"You're putting me on. You mean that you're 
going through all this, and they can't even {uck 
you up?" 

"Bob, for Pete's sake." 

"I've always wondCTed who Pete is." 

"A jerk," I said. "Anoverachieving j«k." 

"Hey, SaUy, don't get carried away. It's only a 
dumb word." 

"Ri^t^ For a dummy." 

"Hie dumb thing Is you're going to tlw Cremi 
DeUte with CaroUne ami Doug." 

I shn^ed, and we went our sq^Muate wajn. 
What was I goii^ to tdl Doug and CaroUne? That 
1 couldn't bou to go into their files and see aU 
those A-number-<^ adjectives? (^ the other 
hand, Doug hadn't shown much intcrat in me un- 
tU now. It was tote when I arrived, Md (wfy 
CaroUne and Doug were in the shcq>. Qrinniiig, 
they were sitting on one side of the booth so I'd 
have to sit alone. 

"Twerps," 1 thought. "Using me." 

As I g(M to the t^de, Doug asked, "You got 
•em, huh?" 

Tlw waitress atme up, and I ordered a coke and 
a blueb^ry-filted cfcwi^ut. 

"What are tlwy?" Ctfdine asked ei^^. 

"They're dmt^nuto with blud>CTries in tlmn," 
I told Iwr. 

CutiUM glared at me. "Come <», S^. Ikm*t 
be a pain." 

"Bong a pain u what I do best." 

"SaUy, are ymi OB son^^t" 

"No, I'm juM bring a dummy.*' 

No one dis^reed. "Wd, ndiat i^Krat our 
IQ's?" CaroUne asked. "Did you find them?" 

"Idkln'tlook." 

"&aiy! Why not?" Cart^ne hiotoi auMyed. 

"I jost dkln't fed Uke looki^." 

"Why <Hdn*t you?" Doug asked pw^ed. 



"ActuaUy," I admitted, "I looked up my own 
first, and it was so depressing I ttocided to totmA 
tiie whole thing." - » r.., 

"Ydu poor tiling," Caroline intoned? '^*Aow 
badwasit?" 

If looks could only kill, she would have been 
gone in a minute. 

"I'm a mental defect," I told her. 

Doug laughted, "That's funny. But Usten, we 
rcaUy hoped you'd find out for us. " 

"Next Monday you can," said CaroUne. 

"Idon'ttiUnkso." 

"No, reaUy, SaUy," Doug insisted. "Are you 
going to look up our IQ's or not?" 

"No, reaUy, Doug. I'm not." 

He stared at my eyes to see if I was serious or 
not. "Yeah, weU, CaroUne and I have to be 
g<ring."hesaid. 

I sat in the big, onpty booth and stared at my 
doughnut. I didn't want a doughnut. I wanted to 
be Uke CaroUne. Tlie waitre» brought me the 
check for six coffees and sevm doughnuts. 

"Those two fed tbdr fa^s aU afternoon," she 
announced b^vwra chcHnps on ha* gum. 

Thrae doUars a«l ftnir wnts. I didn't even have 
a dime to caU my mom to come and pay the bUl. It 
wasn't as if I could have washed the dishes in the 
doughnut kitchen tiU I paid it off, either. Hi^ 
used Styrofoam. I toyed n^ the idea of gmng in- 
to Dtnig's files after aU. The first word in his fUe if 
I had been writing it would have been cheap. The 
waitress stared at me. 

"Bdiodd! Your knight in shining armor!" Bob 
came ban^ng and whackii^ hito the booths. 
"Sorry, " he apolc^ized. 

"It's okay. Look at tius check." 

Bob laughed, "I am about to deUver my 
favorite Une." He paused. "I told you so." 

"Hm point is, Bob, have ycHi got three doUars 
and four ^ts?" 

"Kni^ts m shming armor are always loaded." 
He paid and evai left a tip. 

"Doug was disappointed," I told him. 

"Don't worry. He'U find someone dse to do it 
for him." 

We walked to the bus stop, and he gave me fare. 
"I'Upay y«i back," I promised. 

"Knights in shming armor are insulted wtoi 
tbey*TejmdhKk." 

We sat down ami ««ited fw the bus. 

"Bob?" 

"Yeah?" 

"Yw're nice. Rescuing nw and mM rubbing it 
hi. Jint bang funny. Thanks." 

Ife smiled. AU of a stMkkn I Uked the wcntl mce. 
Why, h was OM of tiie best. Bob was nice. 

"^leaking of nice," B<^ saki, diecking out the 
cnifdn to tte adewattc, "it would be nke to go 
iriA yew to the Rfa« Dance. " 

"Owadiievers are crazy about knights in 
AidiV vm»" I tepXM. 

"DoMtitetmettiyes?" 

"Yes. It does." 

1^ tan psikd up, and B(A> UsMd my Imd. 
"Goodisw. 1^ fau- hKly," Iwei^mMd M I boar- 
ds the bn. The bus driver griuMd. the 
pKa^§K9 vimed, mi I grinned. I took a seirt 
b^Mttedri^. and when I looked into Ids Wg 
mumH- 1 Mw aM CtetriiM but nc. 

ICr^tiaFro^^^ 
Prinoen ^ne Hu|h S^o(rf 
U.tt 






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12 Virginia Beach Sun. November 17, 1982 



A Blink Of The Mind's Eye 



y 



On a blealc Tuesday^a^tetnoon, a famished ar- 
tist sat in his Greenwich Village apartment. He 
had a frozen pizza in the oven, and by the time its 
forty-five minutes were up, he had begun to won- 
der whether acrylic paints were edible. He snat- 
ched the pizza out of the oven, unaware that the 
hot pan was singeing his fingertips, and flung it 
onto the counter. After a few haphazard passes 
with the cutter, he lifted a drooping piece to his 
gaping maw. 



Suddenly he stopped short, staring at a point a 
few inches above the hot pizza segment. Holding it 
in proper relationship to the flourescent lamp over 
the counter, he gazed intently at the rising steam. 
His loudly protesting stomach would have to wait. 
He watched the twisting vapors, noting the man- 
ner in which they writhed sinuously about each 
other, as if mating. For several moments he took 
great pains to be sure that their swirling patterns 
were firmly etched in the retina of his mind's eye. 



Then he blinked. 

In his fingers was a blackened, dried lump 
which crumbled to dust when he twitch^i his 
flnger. The remains on the counter had been 
carried off by rats whose ancestors had long since 
become extinct. 

Perplexed, the artist stood, ambled over to the 
window, and stepped onto the fire escape plat- 
form, which was now fused into a ridge of slag 
that shifted alarmingly in response to his weight. 



All about him. for miles around, sprawled the 
ruins of earth's great population center. Every 
buikttof, ever statue, every edifice, was in a state 
similar to his— molten, curmbling. in ill repair. 

His jaw hung slack. 

He scratched his head. 

He just couldn't understand it. 

And he was hungry. Samlnabinet, 

Mortage '82, 
Kempsville High School 



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Vir^nia Beach &u, Novonber 17, 1982 13 



Community Hews 



** What He Did Was An Act Of Pure Meanness ' ' - Sciortino 



Continued from Pa$t i 

"For my own part, recent Incidents ^h through my 
mind, maldng me wonder aboot my o«^ safeQr/' said 
Buzzy. "I think, though, this sort of thing makes all the 
ofBcetis 8 little more cautipus, wtuch is gbdd." 

Indeed, Buz;^ is the third ^qinia Bcadi pdice 
officer to be shot in the p«it 1 1 months. Officer Sandy 
Buttrey was shot in the head last July. She survived the 
.38 caUber bullet, and was recently bestowed two 
medals by WaU. Officer Daniel Maloney was not graced 
with the same Iwk as Watson uid Buttrey. and he dkd 
c^ wounds suffered during an assault while on the job. 

Watson's ceae is somewhat diffierent. however, in 
that he was not working for the Oty (tf Virginia Beadi at 
the time of the shootii^. lit was engi^ed in a fNut*Ume 
pursuit very po^ilar with Virginia Bew^ poitce 
officers: working ia a security-related ^it^. Many <rf 
the city uniformed officers iffe mti^^ ft malls, 
shopping center md batda in sboitfty-retated c^mc- 
ities. Most, however, v^ir.^JT'WgMa Beadi 
uniforms whfle working the^ other jobs. 



WaU, who for the last few moiuhs has been reviewing 
tlw department's reguhukms that permit officers to 
pursue c^-duty empk^ment, said the recent shootfaig 
would not prompt an imnwdiate change in tbe polides. 
"At this point," he said, "the officers need the exttm 
employment rm just not ready to htt tlwm in tbe 
podcetbook." 

The average starting salary for Virginia Beadi 
poUcemcn is $14,280 per year. For many, that sum is 
not sufficient to pay ibr &mily expenses. "Ihere is no 
doubt about it." siud Kippers. "Police officers need to 
have two incomes. Tliey must have that second job to 
live." 

Said Detective J.S. M<£fauey of thw Qme Solvers 
Bureau: "My wife doesn't work beouue a bat^sitter 
would cost me more than iHiat she would make. I have 
to have a seoood job to iqahe ends meet." McKinney 
moQBlights at Flipper McOay's, an ooeanfrom amuse- 
ment arcade. 

"Ihis wlide business of second jobs is a very 



legitimate concent of the chiefs," said Buz^. "As you 
know, he is not in Savor of it. He realizes, though, that 
the men are only <k)ing it to sunilement their 
incomes." 

Is it possiUe to prevent future s^i assautts through 
tougher legislation? 

"If you are asking it it possible to stop crime in this 
world, there docs not seem to be an answer," said Del. 
Qenn B. McClanan of The House of Delegates' 84th 
EMstrict. "If there was anything on earth I could 
possibly do to stop these sorts of tragedies, I'd do it. 
But, what else can we possibly do?" McClanan said 
he did ndt favor makihg tlw assaoh of a pdioe officer an 
automatioe felony with mandatary ^ time. "The lives 
of people are equally i»edous," he said. "We can't 
elevate the status of policemen over that oi regular 
citizens." 

W.R. "Buster" O'Brien of the 82nd District said he 
was at a loss over how to react to the shooting of his 
friend, Watson. "1 31st don't kmw how we can stop 



something like that," he saio. "We have got to do 
everyting we can to help the officers. M this pomt, 
however, I don't know how anything we could have 
done oxUd have helped Dennis." 

Commonwealth's Attonwy Paul A. Sdortino agreed. 
"That guy had the drop on the police officer," he said. 
"What he did was an act (^ pure meanness, and no law 
on the books would have stopped him. 

"To me. the guy was lashing out at society aiul 
authority." Sdortino explained. "The guy wasn't 
shooting the officer, but the power and the authority 
the badge represents. I don't know that you can do 
anything in that situation." 

"This is something we'll never be able to stop." 
concluded Buzzy. "Hopefully, if punishment is swift 
and certain, it may help a little. 

Gay is being held in Virginia Beach Qty Jail in iieu of 
$150,000 bond on charges of armed robbery, malicious 
assault, and the use of a firearm in the oxmnission of a 
felony. 



Beach Resiieins Invited To Grime Conference 



Crime Solv 



Virgima Beach resid^ts 
and businessmen will have 
an opportunity to learn 
what steps they can take ta** 
protect themselves frran/ 
rising trends in cnitae 
when the Mid-AtUmtic 
Crime Prevention Con- 
ference takes plaot Nov. 
21 through 24 at the 
Williamsburg Hilton Con- 



oma. 



wM Convention 



^ ftjohn Gibson, senior 
'*dce presidoit of Dicto- 
graph Corporation, will 
keynote the inference. In 
addtion, he will lend his 
eiq^ertise to some of the 
workshops. Bigson is 
associated with a cor- 
poratioift thatlf^onsido-ed 



a leader in the security 
field. 

A luMne and burglary 
workshop will be presen- 
te(| by Arthur fii^ton. 
Brifliton, a crime {XreVen- 
tion specialist, has lec- 
tured OEtensivdy on home 
and buainess security; he 
has also produced a num= 
ber of crime prevention 
I»t>gnuns, and hu been 



Vandalized, Burglarized 



ft- 



Sevegi Cars Hit ImPfrking Lot 



At least sevm i;ars wo-e 
burglarized and van- 
'dalized early last Sunday 
morning at the Ukewood 
Square Apartitnents, 
located at 12th Sfreet and 
Cypress Avenue. 

Obscenities weile spray 
painted and lei^ed in 
"Lkiuid Pap«*^ cotrec- 
tion fluid inside at least 
two of the cars. Instru- 
mrat guages and windows 



were also spny, fgkHed, 
Stolen items idcmdod « 
thermos, a box t>f books, 
a leatho- sacM and a 128 
ounce novdty bottle of 
Ruffino wine. An ex- 
posed, unconnected ti4>e 
dedL, however, ww not 




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epntrilnitkig to the crime 
was a iadt of security at 
the 112 unit complex and 
dimly lit parking lots. 

"I have bettCT lighting 
than any other complex in 
the dty," said the resident 
mamger. The owner of 
the cmniriex wps o^t of 
town aiul ^ukl not be 
reached for comoMsit. 

The -|>olice are in- 
yestigtfiii. . 



published in several 
national police and 
security ma^uines. 

C. O. Heal of Ports-; 
mouth will conduct a 
workshop entitkd "Crime 
Prevention and Self 
Protection for the Handi'- 
cap." Neal, an expert In 
the martial arts, has 
recdved statewide aclaim 
for lus efforts with the 
handicapped. Mr. Neal 
will be assisted by Mrs. 
Adell Campbell of 
Virginia Beach, a pioneer 
in the field of special con- 
cern for the handicapped. 

Archer Simmons, chief 
fraud investigator for 
American Express, will 
moderate a workshop 
wkich examines credit 
card fraud from the 
prospective of the con- 
sun^ and the merchant. 

Ray Johnson, author 
and senior security con- 
sultant for Southland and' 
Rand corporations of 
Didhtf .-toias will con&iuict 
an armed rc^bery work- 
top. Johnson frequen 
iMJippeared on nati< 
te^viaioQ, includinj^the 
JolsiH^ Cirson sh|^ and^ 
the Will Donahue^ 



program. Johnson's ex- 
periences inspired a movie 
which has been broadcast 
on the CBS and ABC 
television networks. 

A special workshop on 
crimes against women wiA 
be conducted by Fay 
Warren, a nationally 
known lectiurer. "Crimes 
Against the Elderly" will 
receive special attention in 
a workshop panelled by 
Ron Handy with the 
Virginia Offioe of Aging 
and George Sutherland of 
the National Association 
of Retired Persons, Wash- 
ington, D.C. Mt^^BiH 
Peterson of the NiUional 
Sheriffs Assodation. the 
founders of the Neighbor- 
hood Watch Pribram will 
conduct a workslrap tm 
the program's effec- 
tiveness. 

Gov. Charla Rdbb, and 
Gerald Baliles, attorney 
general of Virginia, has 
also been invited to ad- 
dress the conference. 

Chief WilUam L. Hart 
Etrq^i i^ichigan will 
l|f^ dosing lun- 
Chief Hart ^known 
Detroit arcA ht the 




long and distinguished 
career in law enforcement. 
His record of 2,000 felony 
arrests in one month has 
gone unchanged. Chief of 
Police since 1976, Hart 
has a doctorate in 
Educational Sociology 
from Wayne State Univer- 
sity. Dr. Hart has served 
on the United States At- 
torney General's Task 
Force on Violent Crime 
since March 1981. 

A spedal program for 
law enforcement officers 
and their families has been 
ihduded in the four day 
-seftiOii,*«cxplained B. J. 
Miduud. President of tiie 
Tidewater Peninsula 
P(^ce Crime P^ention 
Association. This 
program, fadlitated by 
Dr. Norbot Newfield, a 
noted Virgibia Clinical 
Psychologist, will explore 
ways of dealii^ with the 
enormous levd of stress in 
police fasulies. jMUchaud 
noted the pr^pKUB i|.^ 
de^psed to aUeviatc 
officer'Mensioa aod striff 
by preforix^ than and 
tl^ families to cope with 
tiie daily pressures of law 
enfor^ment duties. 




Qdi427-«Me 



BylwODrtectfwMMwdPenwt 




GR££NLEAFAUTO 

WE FINANCE 

NO CREDIT CHECK 

EASY TERMS 

545-1265 

1944 N. Btttlefield Blvi., Chesapeake 



mvlsit))e man." ^ 

DR. ROBERT THOMAS 

^AND 

DR. WILLIAM HOLCOMB 

OPTOMETRISTS 

^)edalizing in Family Vision Analysb 

Contact Lens, Extended Wear Soft Lens 

& Children's Vision 

1194 S. I^mihaveii Parkway 

468- 



■ v*_.. 







$1, 000 For Linlier Info 

Already this year over two million dollars in property 
has been reported stden from burglaries to Virginia 
Beach homes and businesses. Also, an average of 260 
burglaries are being commited here monthly. As our 
"Grime Of TTic Week", Virginia Beach Crime Sdvers 
is offering up to a $1,000 cash reward for information 
about burglaries in the linlier subdivision. 

On No«rember S, 1982, between 3:00 p.m. and 8:13 
p.m., two separate burglaries occurred, one in the 1400 
block of Cardyn Drive and the other in the 1400 block cX 
Laurel Vxcw Drive. In each inddent entry was gained 
through a window. Both of the homes were also 
ransacked during the burglary. 

The items taken include a Repouse silver place 
setting for 12 and other assented silverware, assorted 
jewlry, a beige waist-length mink coat, and a Cdt 32 
caliber automatic pistd. These items were valued tt 
over $30,000. 

Virginia Beach Crime Solvers will pay up to $1,000 to 
who calls 427-0000 and provides information 
It these OT any other burglaries. Grime Sdvers will 
also pay cash rewards for information about any crime, 
the apprehension or wanted persons, or for the 
recovery of drugs or stden property. You will never 
have to give your name to be eligible for the cash 
rewards. 

De Bellis Elected 
President of SIDC 

A. James De Bellis, 
Director of the Depar- 
tment of Economic 
Development, City of 
Virginia Beach, has been 
dected President of the 
Southern Industrial 
Development Council 



Virginia Beach's 

Hohietown 

Newspaper 

For Over 56 Years 



Mail your check or money order to: 

THE VIROINIA BiACH SUN 

138 M)SEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach, Va., 23452 



NAME. 



{address. 

iriT Y 






Your Community Service 
Paper is.... 

About you 
About your neighbors 

About Virgima Beach 



STATE. 



I 
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I 
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■ 

I 



PHONE. 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

DOMyear^.OO 
OTwo years $13.00 

ALL OTHER AREA 

aCHie^ $11.00 
DTwo^ars $17.00 



To sabraibe to Tli# Vhflnto iMdi Sun 

just flU out the form on the right. . . 
We'll do the rest... 



I 



1 
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PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 

a new subsmption. D 
I PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
- m now receiving THE VIIMIINiAJ 

BEACH SUN and are renewing I 

^ur subscription. D ■ 



during its annual con- 
ference held recently in 
Virginia Beadi. 

The Southern Industrial 
Development Council is 
an association of more 
than l.SOO professional 
industrial developers, 
dedicated to the economic 
advancement of 17 
southern states. Memben 
maintain high standardsof 
ethics and efficiency, 
share ideas and infor- 
mation, and contribute to 
the industrial development 
profession through study, 
research, and shared 
counsel. 

Some four hundred and 
fifty conferees attended 
the two-day session. 
Featured conference 
speakers included 
representatives of in- 
dustry, finance, 
professional devdopers, 
and govemmoit. 

Outstanding examples 
of industrid dtvfk^maA 
literature were exhibited 
during the conference. 
The Virginia Beach 
DqMrtment of Eamomk 
Devdo^miart ^kUo visual 
presentation, "City 
Lights" received the 
Judges ^ngmI awud fox 
Most Visually Cr^tive 
Presentation and in the 
Literature and 

Promotions Program 
category, tlw "Virginia 
Beach 101" was ji^tged 
"Superior." 

Aragona Club 

Hk Aragona Chutto 
Club win meet <» T^n- 
diqr. Nov. II. at 10:30 
a.m., at Christ 
Pr^i^^teB OntfA. The 
pso^fUEk wtt be a wwl^- 
shop on Christmas 
am^^i^ts. Remits 
we Im^M to tneeA. OiU 
497-a« 9m mtm tefor- 



^■>w*j jgp J J J J 3 f gLj # ji n pui i J J #if J .1 J -^ * 1 1 1 n »^ y I, t y # ' 



>-»* 9 4 9i^9*'^ ■' ■!■ J 1 -g^p < w 1 wij^i^ wmmmmmJikMSi 4.» 4' . 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 





'V^frnt^'''^-: 



t.v: 






Guide To Virginia Beach 

ARTgT & eRAFTcT 
AMTIQUEef 



Countryside Christmas 

Countryside Shops is sponsoring a Countryside 
Christmas Market at the PavOioti on November 27 
and 28 featuring many of the finest craftspeople 
and artists in the area. 

Local merchants will also be represented in a 
special holiday section. 

Supp<^ your local artists and craftspeqsle for 
Christmas giving! 



Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorrows' Heirlooms 




gap 



I 



-COUNTRY HERITAGE] 

-"973 Providence Square 
_ Center, 




Everything to warm up the at- 
moshere of your home from 
Handcrafted Country Fur- 
niture with Hand Carved 
Panels A Designs and Hand 
Rubbed Oil Finishes (made in 
the North Georgia Mountains). 
We also have Hand Painted 
Hutches. Trunks. Decoys. Folk 
Art. Mirrors. Sconces, Tins, 
Handmade Baskets. Weather- 
vanes, Wooden Toys, Country 
Kitchenware, Oak Tables and 
Chairs. 
495-0959 




fOLL ^OJST 



3470 Hoi^nd La* 
Shopping Center 



i 



"Woodstock House For 
Your Country Home." Choose 
from a vast selection of 
Calicos, Custom made cur- 
tains. Country pine furniture 
A accessories for every room. 
Oil and Electric Lamps. 
Primitive prints and Folk Arts. 

420-3248 




THE WEtCOME 
LATCH 

3478 Hollaml Ukes 
Shopping Center^ 




"We have everything to 'coun- 
tfify' your home. " Such as 
Custom-Made' Curta^. Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene , Lamps, 
calico A Lace, Baskets. Rib- 
bons. Hand Di/^xd Candles, 
Floral Arrangements, 
Bathroom Fixtures. Frames. 
Country Kitchen. OrigiHal Ar- , 
twork by Jackk. 15 Rooms 
Full of Menhaadlse. 
46»-6S80 



-iJ^J 









•■*r-.- 



We have the "Heirlooms of 
Tommorrow" and such a 
Friendly Atmosphere. We 
carry the Xavier Roberts Adop- 
tion Babies and have our own 
Floral Designer. Abo we carry 
Hand Dipped Candles, 
WiUwmsburg Arrangimunts. 
Origmal Artvmrk by Bog^, 
specialize in Music Boxes, New 
England Clocks, Sun Catchers, 
Unique Rustic Baskets. Nor- 
man Rockwell Figurines. 
420-656S 




JORDAN'S COUNTRY- 
SHOP 

Comer of Salem 'zz 
and RecreiUioo Drive; 



*^^^l^^- 



Sys 




^0^6 



Once there you will find a 
unkpte collection of Folk Art, 
Granite Wmre, Primitive Pain- 
tings, Sponge Ware, Old 
Fashioned Teddy Bears, 
Bakets Shore Binb. Shaker 
RgproduOions, ra6 OuUim. 
Upholstered Furniture and 
Hath^To-FInd Omnlry ttvnt. 
4tl-MK 




FCOUNTRYSIDE SHOPS 

li^S Landstown Road' 



r THE LADY Pia>DLi» 

FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA. BEACH 



i^^ 



THe "J|pfc» Lady" can h^ 
yon with Ihoae ^feckd tot^hts 
in yotv cooking with a vride 
v0tt^ ^ ^as, herb^ utB. 
Jmmamdmmre. We also have, 
ai^^es, handmmde wraths 
(ptm cones, satin A U^eh 
hm t d^yed eamUes, ribbons, 
caMm bows, flower 
anrnttHfteni s (wtikUi^f, ptr- 
t^ tmd hearth swans by 
.Nkmv. 



■RoaT) 



Cffmbig a very ^fecial coUec- 
HoH of Local Arts and Crtffts 
m well as Colkctibks aiul An- 
tiques in a Wmm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
dwps featuring Country Fur- 
niture-Handmade, critfts. Fine 
Arts, Pottery, Carved WUdlife, 
Calicos and idling Si^i&i 
OiUdren's Tr^^urm, Hpbs, 
^ka. Teas, Antiques and 
ColUetlblei. Slendl Cntfts and 
FoUcArt. 
4X1-9919 



ii^^i 



I I 



1. The Wcteomc Latch 

2. Grandma's Attic, Iik;. 



3. Countryside Shc^ 

4. Jordan's Country Shops 



5. Country Heritage 

6. CcMTicr Cottage 



7. Woodcock House 

8. Mountain Crafts 
9.'n»L«lyPeAtor 



iMHyiii II 111111(11 1 



lUIIIIIMIIIIi 



IHMMII 



immWHHMI 



I'lni'i 



'^iifpft»*» 



ifeH 



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^sw^s'^w^'wwm^mm 



Vu^inia BwA Sun, Nov«nber 17, 1982 IS 



Dr.CliaifesM.Ewfaig 

Podiatrist - Foot SpecinUst 
ANNOUNCES 

The opening of the KempsviUe office. 

Specializing in Sports Medldiie, 

Sm^ery and General Cart of the Foot 

For Children and Adults. 





WE'RE MOVmGT 



Fair f ield 

PTICP1L 

Center 

STOP BY AND SEE 
HOW WE'VE GROWN 

5246 FAIRFIELD 
SHOPPING CENTER g 
VIRGINU BEACH, VA. 
495-1974 




Hampton Roads Cultural Action Plan 



Arts Patrons Need To Know 



What do our hands tell us? 

A child's hands— smooth, pliable, soft and beautiful— 
speak of innocence. 

Tlw hands of youth — ^restless, finger-snapping, rhythm- 
beating — are searching for answers. 

A mother's hands are firm, capable, yet gentle. Dad's 
hands are big, strong — they represent authority. Grand- 
mothnr's hands are wrinkled and veined — they tell us ab- 
out kneading bread . . . and praying. An old man's hands are 
gnarled and crippled, crossed on a cane, waiting. 

Fraying hands, working hands, little hands, old hands 
all grapple with the problems of life. 

Soma problems are too great to solve alone. It takes a 
halping hand . . . outstretched to your hand. 

., With outstretched hands the Church welcomes you, 
seeks you, extends a joyous invitation to worship God. 




By Mike Gooding 

SunSuffWrito- 
"I'm not violently op- 
posed to it," says Ed 
Hurd, prudent of Little 
Theater of Virginia Beach. 
"But, I need to know a 
great deal more about it 
before I can support it. ' ' 

Hurd's comments were 
maik repu-ding the Greater 
Himapton Roads Cultural 
Action Plan, a $72,000 
project designed to 
strengthen existing 

cultural arts programs in 
Tidewater and to en- 
courage arts groups and 
individual artists to sup- 
port the cultural aims of 
local governments. The 
Virginia Beach City 
Council was slated Mon- 
day to vote on donating 
$7,000 to the cause, 
joining Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth and Suffolk in 
pledging financial sup- 
port. 

"My general gut reac- 
tion is, that unless they 
can show me some reason 
for existing, I would say 
they have no business star- 
ting up anotber cultural 
organization." noted 
Hurd. 

Fending off such skep- 
ticism is the job of B. Mat- 
thew Nabur^er, executive 
director of the metropoli- 
taii Arts Ccmgress, a Nor- 
folk-based outfit acting 
as the "pass-through" for 
project. "The people who 
criticize the Cultural Afia . 
tion Plan are the same 
ones who are constantly 
yelling, 'what can we do 
about the beach?'" said 
Neiburger. "If you want 
to attract adults to the 
beach, you have got to 
have something to offer 
them other than video 
gaJDhes," 

.-Nieborger calls the 

^$7,^00 donation from 

. ^ 'Vrndpia fiei^h "an inyest- 

^"''•"ftW^n tffi qljalft> of 

'^Mt.l' Saia Nicburger: 

'The arts are so impor- 



ToMOKlrtcCe. 

ail lagiiilil* Road 

S5S4in 

TV%Smrto$ 



TaSvwYam 



i.*Ltd: 



aaW -C!>wi iMsfifi 



Priocif Imc* 
4SaOPniilirokcMall 

497-4121 

Bniid Nmtie Appttmtcts 
TVt. S^not 



Orcrtoa's Market 

1419P«iid«ttrarcct 



Ei^M«taf Medto, tac. 

* iTDOE. Libmytowt 
' CVMprakf. VA. 23324 
I ■ CkMles d Dorothy Hackwonk 



ThmirleHl P n i ptmidlS i vitHm 
Man. -M. 10106 

ntaMMAaMRoad 

riMiTlflfctiiiiil Miisil 



545-9«« 

Thf Overton's mdEmph^ms 



Mlll^kd 



4740Virtf^ 
^lUa 



Hvd. 



^7-4t54 

T0}4af§. Out 
ASKipteiimi 



■lUlop 

1712] 



tant. Our culture is what 
defines ua as human 
beii^." 

In 1982, some 90 local 
organizations will spend 
more than $8 million on 
cultural arts, drawing 
more than 3 million spec- 
tators to their events, 
which include the symp- 
hony, opera, drama, 
sculpture, painting, and 
ballet. Because of this ex- 
plosion of the arts, an ad 
hw conunittee of some 
120 influential citizens 
from the region recom- 
mended the development 
of the plan. Virginia 
Beach residents involved 
include Councilwoman 
Nancy A. Creech. Virginia 
Wesleyan College Presi- 
dent Lambutb Clarke, and 
Dr. Clarence Holland, 
the former mayor and 
chairman of the Greater 
Hampton Roads Cultural 
Action Plan. In addition, 
several of the largest cor- 
porations and banks in the 
state are underwriting the 
project, as are the Norfolk 
Foundation and the 
Virginia Commission for 
the Arts. 

The Cultural Action 
Plan, due for completion 
next Spring, is deigned 
to: 

•Strengthen cultural 
organizations by helping 
them to make their 
programs more accessible 
to the public, as well as to 
broaden their base of 
financial support. 

•Explore new uses of 
cuhural resources. 

•Help local govern- 
ments, area schools and 
the private sector to better 
attain their, goals by way 
of the cultural arts. 

The project is still essen- 
tially in the planning 
stages, and no one in- 
volved is very specific in 
fpcec|isting the resists 
pl^ Will yield. hoWev 
similar cultural action 
plans are already in 



operation in such diverse 
utBS as Santa Crut, CtH- 
fOTnia, OiarkHte, North 
Carolina, Westchester 
County, New York, and 
Winston-Saton and For- 
syth County. North 
Carolina, and by all re- 
ports, they are successful. 

Implementation of tlw 
plan in April will be ex- 
cellent for all pvties in- 
volved, according to 
Neiburser. "You can 
build parks and bufldings, 
but the thing that really at- 
tracts people is people," 
he said. "If we can get the 
people from all the 
localities to communicate 
with one another we will 
really have accomplished 
something. The parochial- 
ism in the area is an old 
story. Hopefully, this pro- 
ject will help bridge the 
gap. 

Clarke, for one, apees. 
"We need that plan to en- 
hance the strides we've 
made in the last 1 3 years." 
he said. "People tend to 
think of the bMch as a 
tourist town and Norfolk 
as a Navy town. The fact 
is, as we all know, that 
there Is far more to both 
cities. We have gone past 
Richmond by far in terms 
of cultural development." 

"We need to be part of 
an overall cultural pic- 
ture," said Creech. 
"That's a very difflcult 
thing when we are stan- 
ding outside of the group. 
Cultural endeavors are 
very expensive, and we 
can't do it by ourselves. 

"We need to support 
any regiond thrust that 
brings the cities together." 
Creech continued. "The 
Cultural Action Plan is 
-very necessary, if for 
nothing else, than for 
financial reasons. I know 
of no lar^ metropolitan 
area without ji^ regional 
cultural organizatitiii such 
as this one." 

Frederick Schmid, 



director of the Virginia 
Beach Arts Center, is sup- 
portive of the project. "It 
is one thing to say, 'we 
want arts,' but quite 
another to go about it and 
do it." he said. "We are 
constantly asking our- 
sdves how we can make 
the arts better. Maybe this 
could be one way. 

"Everybody is looking 
for some magical for- 
mula," he continued. 
"Maybe there is a better 
way. I'm all ears. At this 
point, though, I'd say this 
plan is our only alter- 
native. As a result of this 
project. I see for the 1.2 
million people in Tide- 
water, ar^ther dimension 
of lite added to the 
already many good things 
th^ can find here. 

"I don't know what the 
final result of the plan will 
be." Schmid concluded. 
"But at least this plan 
seems to have a chance if 
we all get involved and we 
all work hard to make it 
succeed." 

Still, some such as Hurd 
question the project's 
goals. "I'm not siue they 
are going to have any ef- 
fect on the arts at all," he 
said. "Maybe this area 
does not need a central 
organization publicizing 
all the cultural organiz- 
ations. Every one of them 
is not worthy of doing 
well: some of them may, 
in fact, be producing rub- 
bish. 

"I wonder sometimes 
about this community." 
Hurd continued. "I lived 
in Cinncinatti for a while, 
and there, the community 
sells out season tickets to 
professional football, 
baseball and basketball, as 
well as their cultural ex- 
periences-the opera, the 
ballet, and the symphony. 
Here, we can't get a great 
deal of community sup- 
port for anything. I am 
baffled." 



At Arts Center 



*'Watercolor U.S.A." To Open 



"Watercolor U.S.A.." 
a touring art exhibition, 
will open at the Virginia 
Beach Arts Center, Wed- 
nesdayi' Nov. 17, and 
remain on view through 
Dec: 14. The exhibition is 
on a two-year tour of 
museums and universities 
throughout the United 
States undor the auspices 
of TTie Art Museum Asso- 
ciation, San Francisco, 
California. 

Hie exhibit features 40 
puf pring s selected from a 
national competition 
qK>nsored annually by the 
Sprii^eld Ast Museum, 
Springfield. Missouri. 
Each year the museum 
sdects from over 1500 en- 



tries submitted from ar- 
tists across the country in 
an effort to recognize and 
promote aquamedia pain- 
ting (acrylic, casein, 
gouache and watercolor). 

Artists from 22 states 
are represented in the 
exhibition. Their works 
reflect current trends in 
aquamedia painting, 
ranging from traditional 
to more experimental 
t«:hniques. 

"Watercolor U.S.A." 
was exhibited at the 
Springfield Art Museum 
in May and June, 1981. 
Works were selected by 
three central jurors- 
William C. Landwehr, 
Director of the Springfield 



Museum; Suzanne Foley, 
former Curator with the 
San Francisco Museum of 
Modern Art; ami Don 
Nice, a painter from 
Garrison, New York. 

The annual national 
competition was 
originated by the Spring- 
Add Art Museum in 1962. 
Their affiliation with The 
^t Museum Association 
extended the exhibition's 
audience through its 
touring exhibition 
program. 

"We are looking for- 
ward to pladng Water- 
color U.S.A. on view in 
our gallery," said 
Frederick Schmid, Arts 
Center Director. "It will 



be an opportunity for all 
of Tidewater to view some 
of the finest modern 
American art. We are very 
happy that the exhibition 
was able to make us part 
of their tour." 

The exUbition is made 
possibk by a grant from 
the Virginia Beach Arts 
and Humanities Com- 
mission. 

"Watercolor U.S.A." 
will be exhibited in the Arts 
Crater gallery Monday 
through Saturday, 10 a.m. 
to S p.m., b^inning Nov. 
17. The ndiibition wiU be 
free and open to the 
public. Additional infor- 
mation is available at the 
Arts Center, 425-0000. 






428-^51 



417-7^ 

iit.i?aidMM(iittai 



't:^Mrtwlfe>sgifl>n^pr 
• ftta Cms* llittaa Profccti 



MaE*f 



1 



MeB..M.iete» 

4a44tf 



//. 



.N*«J 



,14 




TlelUrpM^ 

Tbci. Md T^ii. ijirf II liiii 
FairfkMS«Mn 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



Exclusive franchise in America's most 
profiuble and dynamic industry is being 
offered for the first time in this area. 
International company wiU place qualifkd 
individual in "Turn Key" business, train 
key people, provide inventory, finance 
your customers, and iMty you thousands 
of dollars "up front" on orders where 
your customers pay only on future energy 
savings. Existing customers of our 
franchisees reads like "Who's Who" of 
Fortune 500. 

If you qualify, you wUl be flown to Um 
Angeles for a tour of installations and 
pe^onal interview. Minimum investn^t 
of 'IS.OOO cash required. Call President at 
14MM23-^56, Ext. R-37. 



THK IS NOT AN OFFERING TO SELL 




TONY 
GRIFFIN 



AND SONS 



U-CALL. WE HAUL FOR YA'LL 

TOP SOIL 

GRAVEL-FILL SAND 

CLAM SHELLS-ROCK 

WASHSAND-HARD FILL 

AND FILL DIRT 

547-5569 

CALL 24 HRS.*7 DAYS A WEEK 



*•• 



^^H 



■■■I 



■■■■■■ 



-'- -^ -^ /^ *r -'r "^ "^ "* "* *■ 't r- -:'^^- -"I- "^ 4fe >. % ^_ "-- ". ""- "; ''" T ^? "T= ^^ "^ "^ ''■- - '^, "' "'t '-" ^. "■- s ■■- -- * "-^ ^- ^ T^- - - -+ -■* -' ^^ --^ -.-.-. . ^ = 



i If I j-^4 J Mmmmmmmmmmmm 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 



Mason's Antiques 



Funuture 
Pamtings 
kweby 





Glassware 

Clocks 

Rugs 



We Pay Cash 

For 

Antiques 

One Piece or Entire Estates 
3353 S. Military Hwy. • 

Chesapeake, VA 
» Phone: 487-2332 

^ — 

Game 1) Arkansas at S.M.U 




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Game 5) Dartmouth at Princeton 



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Game 9) Indiana at Purdue 



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Game 13) Miss St. at Mississippi 



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Game 3) Brigham Young at Utah 



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Game 4) Holy Cross at Boston College 



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Game 6) Florida St. at L.S.U. 



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Game 7) Yale at Harvard 



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Game 10) Louisville at Memphis St 




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Game 1 1) N.C. State at Miami (Fla) 



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Game 14) Wm. & Mary at Richmond 



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Game 15) U.S.C. at U.C.L.A. 



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Game 8) Houston at Texas Tedh 



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Virginia Beach Sun, November 17, 1^2 17 



Bob Harmon Forecasts Week's College Gamesn 



Although some of the glitter has gone out of the 
game, the Razorbacks mMt the Mustangs in what is not 
only the biggest contest of the year in the Southwest 
Conference, but has to be one of the finest match-ups of 
the season in college football. The S.M.U. offense has 
been the most potent offraise in the conference, but the 
Mustangs will be meeting an Arkansas defense that is 
the stingiest among all major college football teams. 
The Hop gave up just 65 poinu in their first eight 
games, and 24 of tbsm were given up in thdr loss to 
Baylor. The Mustangs jnay have to rely on their "tip- 
ped-pass" offense that broke open thdr contest with 
Texas. S.M.U. will be at home, but it's still a "pick- 
em" ball game. And our pick-em: Southern Methodist. 

The Harmon system's average for nine weeks through 
Saturday, October 30th: 1.1^ right 383 wrong for a 
picking perc^tageof .747. There were Thirty ties. 

In Columbus, Ohio State hosts Michigan in what has 
come to be known as "Big Ten Decision Day'^^usually 
(Qt both title and Rose Bowl. Iowa upset the format last 
year. For the first time in fdttrteen years, a team other 
than Ohio State and Michigan r^resented the Big Ten 
in the Rose Bowl. Both Buckeyes and Wolverines come 
into this game with more blemishes than usual on their 
records, but it still remains the conference game of the 
year. The edge... Michigan. 

And Oien there's the U.C.L.A. -Southern California 
clash in the Pac-10 Conference. The Uclans, along with 
Nebraska and Penn State, have the most prolific offense 
in the country. The Bruin total through nine games, 317 
points. Monories of last year's contest should be very 
vivid, espedally in the minds of the losing Uclans... 22- 
21. This year it just might follow the same pattern as 
the favorite is Southern Cal. 



MAJOR COLLEGES, DIV. 1-A 
Arizona 28-Or^oii 7 
Boston College 24-Holy Cross 8 
Bowling Green 28-Long Beach State 13 
Brigham Young 20-Utali 10 
Central Michigan 27-Northern lUinois 14 
Ctemson 26-South Carolina 7 
florida State 27-L.S.U. 23 
Florida 26-Tulane 13 
Fresno State 28-Nevada/Las Vegas 14 
FuUerton27-Pacific21 
Hoiiiton 23-Tex8s Tech 17 
Indiana 24-Purdue 23 
lomi State 24-Oklahoma State 20 
Iowa 23-MicUgaB State 20 
Kansas State 28-Colorado 12 
Maryhuid38-¥i^nki7 
Memphis State 23-Louisville 21 
Miami, Fla 24-No. Carolina State 10 
Michigan 26-Ohio State 20 
Mississippi State 22-Mississippi 20 
Mbsonri 23-Kan8a8 10 
New Mexico 25-HawaU 20 
North Carolina 28-Dnke 10 
Notre Dame 27- Air Force 13 
Oregon State 27-Montana 24 
Pittsburgh 34-Rutgers 10 _^^ 



San Diego State 21-Colorado State 14 

San Jose State 20-Utah State 14 

Southern CaUfonUa 24-U.C.L.A 17 

S.M.U.24-Arkansas21 

So. Mississippi 26-Louisianna Tech 14 

SW Louisianna 26-McNeese Stae 24 

Stanford 28-California 15 

Temple 27-East Carolina 8 

Tennessee 26-Kentucky 12 

TexasA&M21-T.C.U.17 

Texas 24-Baylor 13 

Tulsa 29-North Texas 10 

Vanderbilt 27-Tenn./Chattanooga 15 

V.PJ. 4^V.M.L 6 

Washington 24-Washington State 6 

West Virginia 21-Syracuse 7 

Wisconsin 21-MinnesotalO 

Wyoming 23-Texas/EI Paso 7 

MAJOR COLLEGES, DIV. 1-AA 
Akron 22-An8tiB Peay 10 
Ball State 24-Illinois State 13 
Bethune-Cookman 24-Central Florida 7 
Boise State 24-ldaho State 21 
Brown 27-Colttmbia 14 
Cincinnati 21-Miami/Ohio 10 
Colgate 22-Boston University 21 



Dartmouth 23'Princeton 20 
Delaware 35-Bucknell 7 
East Tennessee 20-Marshall 17 
Eastern Kentucky 30-Morehead 14 
Furman 23-The Citadel 10 
Harvard 24-Yale 14 
Jackson State 27-Alcom 17 
James Madison 29-Towson 17 
Lafayette 24-Lehigh 20 
Middle Tennessee 28-Tennessee Tech 13 
Morgan State 21-Howard 20 
Nevada-Reno 23-Idaho 21 
Nicholls State 24-SE Louisianna 17 
NE Louisianna 28-NW Louisianna 17 
Ohio 21-Kent State 14 
Pennsylvania 28-Comell 20 
Rhode Island 34-Springfield 
Richmond 23-WUIiam & Mary 17 
Southern Illinois 27-West Texas 24 
Tennessee State 45-No. Carolina A & T 6 
Texas/ Arlington 26-Lamar 21 
Texas Southern 31-Prairie View 6 
Weber State 21-Northem Arizona 17 
Western Carolina 27-Appalachian State 13 
Western Kentucky 22-Murray State 20 
Western Michigan 31-Eastem Michigan 7 
Youngstown 24-Northern Iowa 19 



Win Cash 



"'«'»/■ 



*^''''fmm '^1 » t.j^b,ik%i 



»a. '■ 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



^ V 






ItA S«>K* 



iSJU. 






the Winning Teams! 






/ 



f\ 



-%i 



A 



\ 



^ 



Progiibsticators 

Laughon Takes 
Over Lead 

la ittt weeks games "Lean and Mean 
taughon" went 14 and 6 to take over the lead with 
only two weeks left to go. "Kra^Kat^" was 12 
and 8 but still remains in the basement as "Big 
and Bad Coard" went 10 and 10. The totals for 
die ye»r have "Lean and Meui Laughtoo" in the 
lead wtth an ovenlll ie(»rd ei 12S and 7S for a 
I>ercentage ctf 62.5%, In second fAaix, three 
»giunes bebhid the leader is "1^ and Bad Coard" 
with a reoocd at 122 and 78 for arpercettage erf 36 

Last week saw soriie ot the major teams upset, 
§moe^ them wen Alabama and LS.U. Wash- 
nigtoa ^rtuiUy assured to durd straight Rose 
BcnA a|ii)eniiicf and 4he ^C rhamplonship with 
its ^ctory ovtr ^bivn. Mkhigan k the ot^ 
other team assured of playli^ in a major bowl. 
One to their victoo^ over Purdue, wtaf^nng up the 
Big 10 Oonferencx, they wlU be appearing in the 
Bote Bowl New Years Day. Fenn Sti beat NoM 
Dame and wiU surely be appe«ing ik ooe of the 
n^jOf bowU Hew Yeui Dqr, posstt^Iy tadag 
Georgia in tte Si^ar Bowl ta vAat ^xiM be the 
bowl fiir the Natiomd ClHiini^]ttfci|K demsoo. 
<tesplte havuB^ the possibility <rf NCAA prctot^aa 
haasi^ over thek beads, defeated ftwylaiui to 
^MlNtt^lniC a tie for tte AiQQ^Ml. Hie 
(te^n^of l^ttanal OiampiODi wffl i^Iy get a 
m0ff ^hH Ud if they conttmw to wta and the 
HC^ ^oun't put them oo ^slM^ii ftl^ year. 

jh Um ^C Oonfertnee ttien vejims nyyor 
games this week, the ^kmsas vs KM.U. game 
ntiM yeiy weU (tetermiw who goes to ^ Cotton 
&Nvl ^tengh Texas wiU have sometl^ to say 
^obI wto will represent the SWC l^ ytu. 
Texas wiU N at Baylor aiKl needs to win this game 
to ^ff M tlM^m^. to same other raalereiMe 
pUMt ttot nay Mt ^temuie a bowl Wd but are 
MM the lefta^^^ttattt di» to the intense rivatatfy 
Ntween the two Mms inchKfe I%rtte ft. tt 
LS.U. in the mc, K^Mgan at Ohtoft. ta te ^ 
10. MtettssiKrf ^- at Mississippi in the SEC ami 
U.S.C M U.C.L A. in tte fM: 10. Ckmet et load 
interait Ms meek indnte Va. Tech at V.M.L and 
WlDlam ai^ Mwy at Rk^raond. 



Last W^Ks Winners 

IstPlacje 

Robert Ptuming 
1005 I^e^ttir Road 
Chesap^ke, Va. 



2nd Place 

Tom Healey 

429 W.Norfolk Road 
Portsmouth, Va. 



To enter, jusf Check each sponsor on the preceding 
page and flii^ the game. A different game for each 
sp<Hisor fius a tie-breaker. Write down the name of the 
team you think will win that game in the appropriate 
space and the business advertiser's name in which that 
game is located. Failure to write both in the correct 
sf^ce yciii be d«'Ji»r4»H t* wremg ^tiw^ Fnter as often as 
you wish but only on the official entry fOrm below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision will be final. Entries must be post- 
mark^ no later than 12 noon on Saturday. 



WEEKLY PRIZES ! 



GIFT 

CERTIFICATE 
1ST PRIZE 



$ 



CHFT 

ICHRIMCATE 

2ND PRIZE 

FOR MOST CORRECT GUESSES 



FOR ANY 
PERFECT GAME 



I 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 



ENDING 



I YOUR NAME 

I 
1 



ADDRESS. 



CITY. 



.PHONE. 



GAME WINNER 



mSINESS ADVEKTKER 



j (Gaiael) 
I (GaiBe2) 



pGaowS) 



S (Gum 4) 



(Gum 5) 



(GuwC) 



I <Guw7) 
! (GumS) 



GAMEWINNQt 



BUSINESS ADVERTISER 



(Gam 11) 



(Game 12) 



(Game 13) 



(Game 14) 



(Game 15) 



(Game 16) 



(CtaMlT) 



I 



(Cte^9) 



I (GWM !•) 



(Gaaielt) 



« 



If) 



;gmm»)) 



I 



of J^ 



im MEAXilb Pick the 
Mai nunl«9 of pomix scored 
1^' Arka^MS.M'.U. 



TOTAL 



MAIL DORY TO: 



P.O. Box 1327 



<3ies^xake,VA. 23320 



i^^i^irita 



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18 Virginia Beach Sun, November 17. 1982 



Virginia Beach Public Notices 



PiAHc Ntaring 



^^KQmlm V^^BvIR^ 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, December 1, 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA 

1. James C. Ewing requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a pubhc street on Lot 43, Block 1, Section 
Number 1, Baylake Pines, 4216 Ben Gunn Road. 
Bayside Borough. 

2. Claude R. Reynolds, Jr. requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 64, Block D, 
Section 4, Charlestown Lakes, 2009 Sun Valley Drive. 
Kemps ville Borough. 

3. Martin J. Duffy requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 2, Block M-M, Section 3, 
Northridge, 5215 Condor Street. Bayside Borough. 

4. McDonald's Corporation requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a "0" setback from the east property line (boar- 
dwalk) instead of 5 feet as required (patio room) on Lot 
1, 2, and southern half of 3, Block 69, Plat Number 3, 
Virginia Beach Development Company, 2803 Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

5. Norman E. Pavey requests a variance of 5 feet to a 3 
foot side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feet as 
required and of 7 feet to a 3 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (accessory building - garage) 
on Lot 24, Block 10, Section 1, Chesapeake Shores, 4517 
Lee Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

6. Frederick T. Stant, Jr. and Stephen Swain requests a 
variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 30 feet as required (residential addition) on 
Lots 2 & 5, Parcel A-1, Subdivision of Parcel A of F. S. 
Royster Jr., Parcel of Plat A, Linkhorn Bay Cor- 
poration, Cavalier Park, Section 1, 1105 Cedar Point 
Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Gospel Assembly Church requests a variance of 22.2 
feet to a 7.8 foot setback from Bradford Road instead 
of 30 feet as required (canopy) on Lot 72, Bradford 
Acres, 1540 Bradford Road. Bayside Borough. 

8. Ronald Keith Brown requests a variance of 10 feet to 
a 20 foot front yard setback and of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from the 15 foot alley adjoining the west 
property line instead of 30 feet each as required and of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 
10 feet as required and of 10 feet in building height to 45 
feet in height instead of a 35 foot building height as 
allowed (through lot) on Lot B, Block 22, Croatan 
Beach, 641 South Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven 
Borough. I ; 

9. Robert L. James requests a variance of 9.5 feet to ai .5 
foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (deck) on Lot 4, Section 1, Haven Estates, 1013 
Dool Court. Kempsville Borough. 

10. Jayne M. and William C. Lawless requests a varian- 
ce of 4 feet to a 16 foot rear yard setback instead of 20 
feet as required (deck) on Lot 7, Block A, Kempsville 
Lakes, 4813 Aspon Court. Kempsville Borough. 

1 1 . John W. Kellam requests a variance of 13 feet to a 5 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Fentress Avenue) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and of 4 feet to a 4 foot side 
yard setback (east side) instead of 8 feet as require! (ac- 
cessory building - storage shed) on Lot 21, Block 8, 
Chesapeake Shores, 4101 Lookout Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

12. John M. and Elizabeth E. Steiner requests a varian- 
ce of 12 feet to an 18 foot front yard setback instead of 
30 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot 1 and 
Western 15 feet of Lot 3, Block K, Hilltop Manor, 756 
Hilltop Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

13. S & S Enterprises by Jack Slawson requests a varian- 
ce of 27 feet to a 3 foot setback from the 15 foot alley 
adjoining the east property line instead of a 30 foot set- 
back as required (deck and swimming pool) on Lot 8, 
Block 13, Croatan Beach, Wi Surfside Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

. 14. S & S Enterprises by Jack Slawson requests a varian- 
ce of 27 feet to a 3 foot setback from the 15 foot alley 
adjoining the east property Une instead of a 30 foot set- 
back as required and of 7 feet in building height to 42 
feet in height instead of a 35 foot building height as 
allowed (new house, deck, and swimming pool) on Lot 
9, Block 13, Croatan Beach, 804 Surfside Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

15. Karpet Kingdom requests a variance of 10 parking 
spaces to 7 parking spaces instead of 17 parking spaces 
as required (commercial addition-retail establishment) 
on Lot "J", Recorded Plan of Davis Property, »64 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. William O'Prandy requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
5 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (residential addition - attached garage) on Lot 
189, Section 3, Wolfsnare Plantation, 833 Simpkins 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Webster Building Corporation requests a ^^ance 
of 10 feet to a "0" setback from both Great Neck Road 
and Ocean Shore Avenue instead of 10 feet each as 
required (d^ks, storage sheds, and fireplaces) on Lots 
4, 5, and 6, Block G, Lynnhaven Shorn, 0(^n Shore 
Avenue. Lynnhaven Borough. 

18. Lee A. Gifford T/A Haygood Executive Park 
requests a varianx of 1 free-standing sign to 2 free- 
standing signs instead of 1 free-standing sign as allowed 
(park directory), Haygood ExKutive Park, Haygood 
Road. Bayside Borough. 

19. Ronald E. Ruffatto requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
5 foot side and rear yard setback (southwest comer) in- 
stead of 10 feet each as require (swimming pool) on 
Lot 19, Block C, Section 2. Kenstock, 4213 Jenan Road. 
Lynnhaven BorcNigh. 

20. PAPCO OU Ompaay reqae^ a variance of 25 feet 
to a 10 fo<H setback from Princess Anne Road instead 
of 35 feet as requiral ^imp isUumI canopy) on Parcel 
A-2. .55 acres. Larkspur Square. 4720 Priiuxss Anae 
RcMul. Konpsville Borou^. 

2! . Jame A. and Mary E. Kinzel requ«ts a variaux of 
9 feet to an 1 1 fo<M fuim ynd adjaorat to a stre^ ^.aai- 
^i^ U^) tat^ $iX^mu ttq^md Mtf ei 9.6 
fg^ to a .4 f o«C ttm jwtf t^&ck iutead <rf 10 fe« m 



required (accessory building - storage shed) on Lot 28, 
Block 7, Section 10, Princess Anne Plaza. Princess An- 
ne Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Virginia Beach Bank of Commerce requests a varian- 
ce to allow parking in the required setback along both 
35th Street and the 20 foot alley adjoining the south 
property line where prohibited and to allow parking in 
the required setback where prohibited when a commer- 
cial district (B-4) adjoins a residential or apartment 
district (west side) on Lots A & B, Block 108. Linkhorn 
Park, 306 35th Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
W. L. Towers 
Secretary 
2T11/24VB 



UgalNttic* 



LEGAL NOTICE 
TAKE NOTICE that on 
November 26, 1982 at 
10:00 a.m. at the premises 
of Tidewater Imports, 
Inc., 3152 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 23452, 
the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash. 



reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following 
motor vehicles: 
1980 Mazda RX-7, Serial 
ilSA22C572527; 1981 
Honda Accord Serial 
#JHMSM5328BC011108; 
1978 Pontiac G.P., Serial 
I2K37Y8A174248. 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
ltll/17VB 



The Student's Guide 
To The Virginia Beach 
High School Curriqulum 



The ultimate goal of any school system should 
be to prepare its students for success. Studies have 
shown, however, that many students are not effec- 
tively educated, and that inflexible school systems 
are becoming even more ineffective in the face of 
the rapid advance of technology. Yet, as a 
student, I believe that the obsolescoice of modern 
school systems could be alleviated with only a few 
minor changes in the general curriculum . 

With the increasing number of ill(^ aliens en- 
tering the country from Mexico, Spanish is an ab-, 
solute necessity for daily communication. French, • 
I German, and Latin»,have no such uses, however, 
+ ^antf sliOtnin)ti"«I^ffiialed. Anyone speaking Ger- 
man sounds as if he should receive the Heimlick , 
manuever, Latin has been dead fdr hundreds of * 
years, and anyone speaking French sounds as if he 
has a severe nasal disorder. In place of these 
useless classes, new classes should be created to 
teach people speaking the foreign languages of 
Boston, Massachusetts; New York, New York; 
and Montgomery, Alabama. 

Like language programs, physical education 
programs require much revisiojn. Instead of 
teaching outdated sports like basketball, gym 
classes should help students learn to conquer the 
athletics of itfOdem America— video games. Any 
moron can bounce a ball, but (Hily the most adept 
person can drive his minature space ship through a 
host of enemy invaders without being blown to 
smlthoines in the process. 

Math classes, too, should be designed to tackle 
the modern problons of today's students. Why 
teach students to solve complex mathematical 
problems when a simple calculator or personal 
computer could do them faster without any 
margin for error? Math classes must forego aU 
traditional mathematical concepts and teach stu- 
dents in the computer field. A sample course 
might be "Advanced Button Manipulation 11". 

Like math classes, science classes are practically 
worthless in modem society. Any student can 
learn all he needs to know about science from the 
formidable television set. With shows like "Bat- 
tlestar Gallactica" and "Grizzly Adams," who 
needs ridiculous and confusing courses like 
astronomy and biology? One notable exception is, 
of course, chemistry, for every student should un- 
derstand just which drug he is injesting, inhaling, 
or injecting. 

Finally, the greatest change should be in the 
area of English. Hiese clasMS metcly present 
students with confusing questions like "To be or 
not to be," and can only be (tetrimental to the 
student's education. What good is a subject that 
pments conflicting ideas and causes students to 
oKilessly ponds' and question their miserable 
existoice? &u-dy studoits could be happier, more 
sucGosful pec^le if they could f(»r^o this wor- 
thless iMjnsmse and turn to the all-encompassing, 
uuiuestionabte gospel of Jerry Falwell and the 
Moral Majority. Not only are FalweU' ideas one- 
sided and easy to undmtand, but they are the 
ideas of m(»t otho^ people and they are the ideas 
of God (Jerry even sa^ so himsdO- For this 
reason. Eni^h class shcmld be a rational aff«r 
with e^^iy dass ntting around a bonfire of useless 
books by Shakespoue, Eliot, and other h^ithens, 
wUle watdnsf jory Falwdl preach his straight- 
fonrard, uncoan^cated (toctrine. 

If Khod sj^raw owld be so boki as to instigiUe 
the Mtfed ten^om, ttiMteits, as weU as sodety in 
feneral, wouM be betts off. Not only wouU 
stttctats be bett«- abte to survive in today's c^m- 
pte tedbm^kipai wmU, but govemmats wcvM 
be bma iri>te to fSfvtm, {veactos betto' abte to 
pgme^, and even tea^^s b^^ able to totch in 
tUs w(xM duK iwmU iMve bean» so devoid of 
•porthlets queitlonittg and revolt against 
jomtMCTfav SBtlKKity. 

Kmptvi^ra^Sckod 



A Struggle F6r Dominance 



The impotent sun of Indian summer had barely 
tqpped its arc over Wetlad Flats. Noctumd 
animals, which usually hid from the midday rays, 
lay languidly in the weak half-light. Activity on 

"The Flats," as the infamous marsh was called by 
neighbc»ing farmers, was always slowest at nootti 
the hottest part of the day. But even so late in the 
season, theie was very little movement, from 
force of habit. The thousands ai desolate, 
bog-ridden acres stood silent. , 

Any inhabitant or neighbor of Wetland Flat! 
inevitably ccMnplained of two things: the 
mosquitoes and the dampness. The dampness of 
the oversaturated, spongy land was inescapable. 
Putrid, sulphuric water bubbled up from the 
lightest footstep, even an the chdcest farmland, 
and most of the nuush was covered with anywhere; 
from three inches to twelve feet of stagnant water, t 
No dweller of Wetland Flats, man (x animal knew 
what it was to be absolutely dry. 

Waif reflected upcm these thoughts of wetness 
as he sloughed through another bog, breaking the 
peace of midday with his struggles. The 
treacherous mud suclwd at his hooves, and 
bracing his frcmt legs and bowing his muscular 
neck with the effort, he pulled his hindquarters 
free. The horse stood, drained, at the edge for a 
mc»nent, then shook his coat, trying in vain to 
dislodge the gray, slimy mud. 

NtHing the futility of his efforts. Waif lodced up 
at the noon sun, thankful it wasn't hot enough to 
bake the remaining mud on his back and legs into 
a painful shell. The stallion turned and continued 
to pick his way over the Flats, slowly and wiUi 
reserve. He knew he would need aU the strength 
he could save for the confrcmtation facing him. 

Waif paused, lifting his sculptured Arabian 
head high, nostrils flaring, ears pricked. The 
herd was just ahead, and when he found it, he 
would wait. The moment would come, and Waif 
had waited too Icmg to ruin it by rushing his move. 
Any of the Flats' farmers could have identified 
the enormous mud-covered stallicm by sight, for 
he was their pride. They had raised him. The 
band of inbred, wild hcx-ses of Arabian ancestry 
that roamed the marsh at will had inexplicably 
cast out the cdt soon after his birth four years 
ago. The farmers were stunned, for no one* had 
ever seen a live marsh Arab colt. Tiny, pitiful 
corpses were occasionally found with split skulls, 
evidently the work of the ruler of the heard, a 
monstrous black stallioi the fanners named 
Angus because of his unusual short-legged, 
A^ihick-cbested physique. From AdbUUUUx^ Angus 
'resembled a large Hdstein bull, not an Arabian 
^, horse. The stallion and his band were truly an 
enigma-nrver seen except at a distance or at 
death, and yet the same colt, by some twist of 
fate, had lived. And the locals, a curious lot, lock 
it upon themselves to raise the lone surviving 
male foal. 

The rich feed and constant exercise running 
from farm to farm worked wonders on the foal 
they had named Waif because of his emadiUed 
conditicm. In his fourth year now. Waif had the 
height, build and physical maturity of a stallion, 
twice his age, and had noat of the misproportion 
or poorness of coat that plaughed most dthe wUd 
marsh horses. He possessed a fineness of line, 
despite his awescnne size, that spde ai Arabian 
fludity and grace. His satiny white coat was 
lightly spotted with the dapple of good health and 
was thickened to a mini-like texture by Uie 
ccmstant groaning of the salty marsh winds. 

At the monent, however. Waifs coat was 
covered with gray mud, lending him an invisibility 
that gave him confidence as he sttod in a clump of 
cypress near the herd. The dirty white mares 
grazing just a few feet away were unaware of him, 
as was their stalli(m, Angus, who stood on a ridge 
across the pasture. 

Waif watdied the big black, sizing him up: Ms 
sire, who had tried to kill him so long ago, but had 
in reality only stunned him and left him for dead. 
Only a shadow of a memory in Waifs mind, tlw 
faint recdlectioi had fostered in him hate and 
revenge. 

Waife noted with satisfifu:tion that Angus was 
aging; his brute strength was diminishing. Waif 
could tell by the slight sag in Angus' heavy, 
bunched muscles, the prominence d tlM knotted 
veins, the bowing of the shot, piston-like legs, 
and the deep hdtows above his eyes. The bulUsh 
horse was still a formidable opponent, however, 
and a smart one, for his habitual sluighter of male 
foals had kept him in his position for fiu longer 
than nature had intended. No colts readied 
maturity, leaving Angus with nq rivals, maUng 
him soft. Now, all that would change. Waif would 



destroy the dd stallion and take his herd. 

Waif stepped out of the trees, Spanish moss 
clinging to his flaxen, matted mane, giving him a 
surreal appearance. Angus saw him instantly and 
stood for a moment transfixed. His deep 
breathing quickened, his eyes widened, and his 
ears flicked forward and then plastered back in 
the classic position of equine rage as he perceived 
the intruder's challenge. 

The dd stallion suddenly moved fwward as if to 
attack, then turned and began to round up his 
band of mares and fillies, fury dissipating into 
uncertainty with every move. At a swift, twisting 
gallop, he drcled the far-flung group, gathering 
them into a comer of the muddy pasture, his 
actions strained and nervous. 

The two stallions faced each other across the 
marsh plain, hooves covered by water, motiailess 
as statues. Angus moved forward a little, then 
stopped, lowering his head and pawing a trench in 
the soft mud. Waif stood without a quiver, his 
head high, weight forward, hind legs stretched 
back. 

Suddenly, in a splash of water and mud, the dd 
black rushed forward. One will seemed to animate 
them both, f« Waif charged too, his fluid stride in 
stark contrast to his sire's choppy, bovine gallop. 

Angus drew first blood, A red stain sprang out 
of Waif s whithers and spread down his shoulder, 
mingling with dried mud and water. 

They whirled and reared to strike each other, 
flinging mud, water and blood through the air. 
Angus reached imder and seized Waifs throat 
with blunted yellow teeth, tearing at the jugular 
vein. Waif locked his long fiorelegs around the 
grinding jaws, his superior weight and sb«n$th 
forcing his sire b«:kwards. 

The horses staggered like wrestlers, and Wjdf 
began flailing his hooves on the back of his 
adversary, striving to land a crippling blow to the 
kidneys. The dd stallion tore loose and slipped, 
Galling to the ground in a mighty splash wfaidi 
momentarily blimled Waif. He regtuncd his feet 
'before the younger horse could press the 
advantage. - ; ^. j 

There was a jagged, bteeding cut in Waifs 
throat, but he showed no signs of tirmg. Angus' 
body was laced with bloody, open wounds. The 
unnatural expansion of his nostrils showed the 
beginnings of exhaustion. 

Again the stallions charged each other with 
heads high and stiff, lifted tails. They met, r<^e, 
lashed^ swerved and sank with coiling equme 
-grl^.'11i^%ei% fllMtig not only each other but 
also iJie bog and the watei'r Their hHUSimd mHH' 
becoming more treacherous is they destroyed the 
spaise marsh grass and revealed the slimy levels 
of sulphitf and mud beneath the water. 

The stallions reared, and Waif quickly thrust 
his muzzle in and caught the lower foreleg of the 
black stallion before he could withdraw it and 
fractured the bone in a single, twisting crunch of 
the jaws. 

, The dder horse showed no reaction. The 
moment Waif loosened his hdd, Angus rose to his 
full height. One foreleg dangled uselessly, but he 
still had that mighty right hoctf with which he had 
nearly killed the <xit four years ^o. The same 
ilow would do it now. 

Waif, too, was on his hind legs, feinting as if to 
strilK. He saw the blow coming, and in mid-air 
whirled, dropped his head, and lashed out with 
|us heeb in a sfway of water. 

As Angus came (k>wn, his ftwe received the full 
impact of Waif s terrible hooves, and both cheeks 
were ripped open so that the skeleton (rf his head 
was bared. 

The dying horse feU to the ground. Before he 
coukl attempt to rise. Waifs right hoof shot out 
and rose and feU with shirttering farce, deaving 
the skxdl. Blood spouted from thje fatal wound, 
turning tto surrounding water murky red. Angus 
shuddered and was still, dying as he had killed so 
many others. 

Waif lifted his bloody crest and noade the marsh 
echo with his deep, unnatural soeech (tf triumph. 
The Iwrd milled nervoi^ly as the enormous 
gore-covered stallion reared and stamped the 
de^ horse's head into the ground with his front 
hooves. 

The Iward's movemeiUs »ught Waifs attent- 
i^ mi he charged victoriously towards them, his 
masterftd gait skimming the scarred ground. His 
n^ements carried a mess^e . He was the leader; 
i^ was his birthright as a survivor ctenied to so 
naany deiul. The her and the Wetland Flius were 
his domain. , 

' Grey Sweeney 

Cox High School 



Untitled 

I Mt in the attic, 
ledi^ the oM I^ht 
cooM through 
the anient ^per 
wi^owduute 
y^nvedUkethe 
pa^s of okl hooks, 
i lat and wond^ed 
itt the dust nuHes 
MMkamlgdd 
^dnst the ambo- Me. 



Kempsv^H^Sd^irf 




^ 



■Nai^kMM*!! 



■«■ Wl 



"'w^^sm^mmm 



Virgiiiia Beach Sun, November 17, 1982 19 



486-3430 





1. 



«• IrotttrayciM 



3 



QUAUrV UPHOLSmRY 

REFINISHING - 26 years 
experience on Thomisville, 
Drexel, Ethan Allen, Drew, 
ding and Kincaid. We also do 
antiquing and all kinds of 
rqjairs. 905 High Street, Por- 
tsmouth, V A 399-90S6. 
MT-12/I 



HONDA • 1979 OL-1000. 11.700 
miles, am-fm stereo and cassette 
Upe deck. Black with gold trim. 
Complete tour kit. »3.500. Call 
547-8413 after 5 p.m. 

TFN 



i-tMb 



GROW YOUR OWN FRUIT. 

ftee copy 48 pg Planting Guide- 
Catalog in color. One of the 
most complete line* of planting 
material ottatd m Virginia in- 
cluding fruit trees, nut trees, 
berry planu, grape vines, lan- 
dscaping plant material. 
Waynesboro Nurseries. Inc.. 
Waynesboro VA 22980. 
14T«-> 



JUNK CARS AND TRw.CKS — 

towed free. S<Mne bought. Call 
485-1961 or 485-3859. 

1-8T-12/29 

GUN SHO^ -December 
18th and 19th 1982. ^iginU 
BEach Dome, 19th and Pacific, 
^op for Oiristmas. 

1-6T-12/15 



CARLSON JET BOAT - 1978. 
23 foot, cuddy cabin, Tandem 
Traiter, low hours and fast. 
Asking $6,985. CaU 460-3573. 
Afia 5 caU 481-0096. 
8-TFN 

IS' FIBERGLASS BOAT- 

Evuvude motor, trmler included. 
All in good shape. Must ttU. 
$750 or best offer. Call 463^550. 



9. CBijun 



~2 



2.NriMiali 



MARAUDER • 1983, 35', never 
occupied, patio door, lArge 
refHgerator, air, 8 x 12 awning. 
Must wU. Will saeraflce for 
$7900 C^ 4884)023 or 485-5598. 
94TI2-8 



RECEIVE A MASTERCARD 

OR Visa. Ouannteed, nobody 
refined; for ftec broduire call 
House of Qedit. tid] free 1-800- 
442-1531 anytime. 
2TFN 



10.IM|iWaiitoil 



RBCDVE A MASTERCAU> 

(X Visa. Guaranteed, nobody 
refuted: for free iMwhure call 
House of Oedit toll free l-tOO- 
442rr531. 

24T 11-17 



4.Mm 



_] 



FORD GRANADA • 197S, looks 
like new, am/fm cassette, new 
tires, #12 inspeoitm. Low down, 
owner flnandas. CaU 483-01 14. 

MBm 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

Immediate openings overseas 
aqd domestic. 20,000 to 50,000 
plus a year. CaU 1-312-920-9675 
ext. 1447A. 

l'0-4T^ll/ 

$186 DAILY<eaEnings workijftg 3 
hours a day >t huine. Your ear- 
nings fuUy gu^anteed in writing. 
For complete details and ap- 
pliaUion, please send a sdF ad- 
dressed envelope to: E.V., 272 C 
Rooco Dr.. Harrisonburg, VA 
22801. 

104T-11/24 



DATSON • IIM, 1973, 
aut(miatic, am/fm cassette, good 
traa^wrtation, low down, owner 
wiU fioMice, 'Call 483-01 14 

. 4-4T-12/1 



_uid. 



■ i ^ iii i ii. i 



FOlUk ^V«iT<llf-19««,'489 , 
engine, automatic iransmission, 

4 doOT. AU original, nms great, 
looks great, no rust. Motor has 
never been gone into. Power 
train great. Less than 88,000 
miles, all original. CoUcctMi 
item. $1200 wUl talk toadc. GaU 
Dave at 547-4571 between 9 and 

5 or after 5:30 call 495-0990. 

4-TFN 

CHEVROLET - 1974. Irapala 
Wagon, automatic, power 
steeiaig and brakes, air, new 
eiVJne with about 10,000 miles, 
brand new alternator, taRery 
ud tires. ExceOeat running con- 
(Stioo.$950.adlM3-1423. 
44T12-8 

CfNIVETTE • 1978, showroom 
cendidon, 4 speed, AM/FM 
stoeo, dlt steering wheel, T-top, 
maroon with white interior, low 
nrikage, $10,500. CaU 420-31«. 
41Tli-17 

DCNIGE - 1973, Chalknger, 318 
ataooiatfe, ^, A-1 nmctttioii. 
$2,230. Can 467-S80S. 

' 4IT1M7 

CADILLAC '1961. Gray Lhao, 

runs good, interior excdieat 
condition, loaded with many ex- 
tras, air. CaU 583-3594. 
4 IT 11-17 

CHEVY - Chadon, 1980, air, 
low mUeage, automatic, exccUcnt 
conditio. $3,990. C^ anytime 
481-7924. 

4<ri2-8 



^ 



HANDY MAN-PART TlR^ - 

Oenoral Maiittefaanc«, sweeping 
deanfaig, painttaig, and minor 
rqMin. LmkIod Bridge, area. 

SALES BY lEUEPIKWE > In 

home or at the office. Miiiimum 
vnge plus bonus payments. Need 
ifflmediately. 56 year old com- 
pany. Cafl Robin at 5474571 . 

" IQTFN 

PART OR FULL TIME - 

C^tmings for the worlds lar^st 
Aloe Vera Corporation. No in- 
vestmeiit. For information write 
P. O. Box 152. Virginia Beach. 
VA 23454. 

lOITH-17 

WANTED SAI^S- 

RqiresatMive for Norfolk and 
Virginia Be«:h. Also dealers for 
toys, gifts, electronics, beach and 
camping at guaranteed sales 
prices. Inquire at ' L ^ L 
Distributors, 9912 Warwick 
Blvd., Newport News, VA 
23602. OrCaBI77-»39; • 

KMT-ll/24 



11> PtriliMn Wmtitf 



GENERAL HOUSEdeaWng, 
reUahle and eiQMriaioid. CaU 
340-13I9. 

U-TFN 



ta. 



CHEVY-19n Mooa, 2 ^lor, 
am/fm I track. 4 Q«ad(r. pMd 
(Ml gas. Oo0do(»MUtkHi. $3,000. 
CaU 4^-9099. 

4-4T-11/24 



S.TiMto 



OWN YOURt>WN «U^«ESS 

— Jen Stop • CSilM^ l^op - 
Dress Sai<H>- $5,900 to 110,500. 
In store traiaisg. Grand 
Opaiing. Fixtures instidkd. 
CaU right now! Mr. CMlton at 
S0l-3»-lM0. 

12.8T.il/17 

THE UmE WK» FraadUte 
hu stme owner/c^erator Offxir- 
timity to the Va. fttacb vea. Fw 
amre taiftxmtiaB please write 
and sod resuac to: The Love 
Sk^ 3438 <k*y^ dr.. Ft. Wor- 
A. 1^.76118. 

I24T 11-17 



G»K • "n Stan QsuOe Sim, 
Cmpe, 2 tone aarooa a^ 
ofwge, 60,000 arilca. See to ap- 
Bfedite. Hmm, 4 BM LMO 
fmia^m Raitab, Um » 

" ^ Iff 10-17 

^Arnm - irn. kii* cm>, 5 

over-drtve, AM/PM 

mm*. o^MT mm, 

ijggs ndM. Hm$. CUI ^ 

|Mf or 444-MI3 aad Mk fw 

S4T12.8 




Ammmm 



m-nn 



GEOROm^^W 
POINT i^ 



HomeSite /or 

Peopk Pkniumg 
Homes lit Custom 

SAL^orncE 

SUProvMtiieeM. 



CALLM4-f317 



13.NIS 



NANOAY CONOUR ■ Part 
land tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, cage included. 
Moving must seU. $75. CaU after 
6.497-6280. 

13TFN 

BIRDS • Cute and cuddly Love 
Birds. An^ectiomlte Uttle peU. 
CaU421-9S54. 

13 IT 11-17 

DACHSHUNDS — Miniatures. 
AKC. 5 weeks old. $175.00 488- 
5651. 

13 IT 11-17 

GERMAN 8BEPARD Pup- 
pies - AKC rcgittoed, for pet 
or show. $150 ami up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPARDS. CaU4m-8085. 
13-TFN 

UAME8S KITTENS - R^ 

Point, registered: champion 
sved, show quaUty, $200. 481- 
3358 

— 13TPN 

YORKSIHRE Terrier puppies - 6 

weeks. AKC, 2 females. 499- 

4329. 

13 4T 11-17 

KENNEL HELP WANTED - 

CaU 10 to 4 daUy . 421 -741 1 . 

.,„ 13 IT 11-17 

CdoiXR SPANIEL PUPS . 
AKC registered. 3 beautifkil male 
and female. Taking deposits 
now. WUl deUver for Christmas. 
$200. must see. caU 468-1 148. . 

' • 134T12-8 



15' nppRMICOS 



WASHER-DRYER . Kelvinator, 
18 lb. capacity, amber color. 1 
year Old. paid $998. asking $500. 
CaU 428-6242, 

' ■•' 15 IT 11-17 

FURNACE • Oil. central unit. 
80^)00 BTU $300, 275 gaUon 
tank for S75. Duckworth 2700 
sq. ft. S:K)0. Call 466-8187. 

13 IT 11-17 






FtrSalt 



iUt-'V 



WELL DRILUNG RIG - Por- 
table,' will go any where. 
Reraovabie axd. 100 feet of pipe 
and dpi. S149S. Call 543-0205 or 
425-0722. 
16 4T 11-17 

WOOD STOVE - OatUng type, 
us^ 1 year. $350. 495-3621., 
lfr4T-12/l 

WEDI»NG l«ES8 • Size 12. 
VcU itnd (diapd train. exoeUent 
condition. SUM. C:att424-«92. 
164T 11-17 



i7. FmnlliNV 



MUST SELL MOVING - 2.pc. 

bedroom set; dresser w/mirror. 4 

drawo' chest, bookcase bed. AU 

hartlw^ood construction, Ught 

walnut. Excellent condition 

$325,340-7689. 

___, 17 4T 11-17 

CHAIRS - 2 livingroom 

traditional Ught Uue. ExceUent 

(»nditioB6d. $160. CaU 482- 

5353. 

174T11-17 

3 IWa, SOLID 1EAKWOOD 

&ereo CaUnet - 83" long, lots of 
storage space for tapes and 
records. Has Sony reel-toured 
tape deck and Sony recover 
SR60tt. 30 wiOtt per chani^. 2 
Sansui speakm, S>2000. Space 
in cabinet for turataMe. AU for 
$mO. CaU 588-5811. 

17TFN 



ta. 



IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
McklMxs; VaMsaad Boxa: 1804 
^by St., &5-91 19. Dafly tO-5. 
18 TFN 



SERIOUS COLLECTORS ■ 

Ran spponts^l ijum ctMec- 
tion ef British AntomoMIe 
<MeM ta tte world 
to 1^2. CkU 5r. 

18 Zr 1 1-24 



D 



IMMbl*ilA^X.TV.i 
1^. 

2i.*r-ii/^« 



Tha ««M MAMatt ef 

mm^m^ ^ve it a 



22.Jtw«lry 



LADIES JEWELRY FOR SAIX 

Om bulies cocktaU ring with 45 
diamcMids and is 14 carat ydlow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white gokl 
23 jewel ladies Bulova ««t^. 
Ring Upraised at $3400 and 
watch appraised at $1900. WUl 
seU either for half the appraised 
value. CaU 547-0858 after 5.-00 
p.m. 22TFN 



24.Waii«MlT«lqr 



JUNK CARS Wrecked or run- 
nfaig, cash-free towiag. We also 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. CaU 487-922Zor 
after 6 p.m. 340-1059. 

24 TFN 

CASH PAID - Virginia Beach' 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefuUs. Also, good 
used furniture. CaU 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 



25. ttMd Things To Eat 



FRESH TURKEY'S > Loca% 
raised and dressed. SI. 30 lb. Or- 
der now for Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. Carey Poultry Farm. 
467-3078. 467-0251. or 461-1580. 
25 4T 11-17 



2S. bilvrteinNMiit 




FCm 8ALE-70 Ballroom dance 
loscms. Can Larry Dunn for' 
more information 480-2154. 

26-TFN 



29. Lawn A ClardM 



FRUIT TREES-Nut trees^ berrV 
plantt.^ grape vines, landscapink 
phmt^material-oneKd by one of 
Virginia's largest growersi Free 
copy of 48 page Planting Guide 
Catalog in color on request. 
Waynes Boro Nurseries, Inc., 
Waynesboro, Va. 22980. 

29-4T- 11/24 



ACnON TREE SERVICE - A 

Iffofenional complete tree ser- 
vice. 20 years eyicrience. 
Licensed and insured. Free 
estinutte. CaU 399-7011. 
29-TFN 

MULCH4UTLER AND SSm 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We ddiver in one 
day. 853-(tt30 or 855-7467. 

29 TFN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and lawn ser- 
vice. Free esdmates. 543-4949. 

»TFN 



FINE STRAW FOR SALE - By 

the truck load. WUl deUva. Call 
547-8588. 

29 2T 11-2* 



32. Bmlmsi Far i«rt 



STORES AND STORAGE 
AREAS - AU sizes. Prop»tie$ 
unlimited. Marvin Ooldfarb. 
399-8390.484-1275. 

32 TFN 



FtrlMit 



HOUSE TO SHARE in 
Chrs^wake. $150 a mtHith plus 
Vi tttlUties. Non-smoker 
prefOTed. 488-5895 

34 4T 11-17 



33. MpartaMiits Fif INiit 



APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
loqWions. one and 2 bedroom 
apvtflMms. From *2f0. Rental 
rtfflce. 482-3373. evenings 482- 
1M2. 3^ Johnstown Road. 

33 TFN 



MfMRi 



a week wMi 
Ckeitt ItoU^ 

57«. 



UNT-S23 

piMedges. 

C^ 547- 

35 »- 11-24 



WMXy PAtt . 13 ky «, 3 bed 

(OMi. wood mm, tabbed, all 
heiM by 
!^.aatM.MQriti9«i 
te. KM Oceana «m. Pefw 
**^»r. V.000. Cafl tnr6mt 
«5-«W6. 

384T124 



ai.lMlEiMi 



41.CMfMtnr 



RARE OPPORTUNITY 

Buy a Home at Your Own Price. 
26 Houses A 2 BuUding Lots 
Selling Individually at AUC- 
TION Sat., November 20th, 
10:00 a.m. EASTERN SHORE. 
VIRGINIA, Located throughout 
Accomac County and 2 in Nor- 
thampton County. These 
properties wiU be available for 
ihunediate possession, since title 
is held by and the sale is being 
conducted for Faimers Home 
Administration. DweUing sizes 
vary from 800 to llOO'sq. ft. 
Lot sizes vary from 15.000 to 
20.000 sq. ft. Condition varies 
from some houses ready for oc- 
cupancy to some in need of com- 
plete remodeling. EstinuUed 
Values range from $5,000 to 
$20,000. AU properties include 
separate wdls and septic systems 
and are located on paved sUte 
roads. ATTENTION! HOME 
OWNERS - INVESTORS - 
CONTRACTORS - HAN- 
DYMEN - HOLDERS OF 
RENTAL PROPERTIES. Sale 
Location: Eastern Shore Com- 
munity CoU^e Lecture Hall, 
Melfa, Virginia. TERMS: 10* 
Deposit Sale Day in Cash or 
Certified Funds. Balance in Cash 
at Closing within 30 days or 
Terms Available for applicants 
applying prior to sale day. AU 
Sales Subject to Immediate Con- 
firmation by Farmers Home 
Administration. For DetaUed 
Brochures Including Individual 
Pedographs and Exact 
Locations, CONTACT-—— 
OWNBY AUCTION & 
REALTY CO., INC. 1301 Her- 
mitage Rd., Richmond. Va. 
Telephone 804-358-8493 (An 
Equal Housing Oppoftiuiity) 

36.3T.il/17 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING, 
ROCnNG • and aU types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screou repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 420-8453. 

il TFN 






CHILDCARE • My home, 
anytime, drop-in's welcome, wiU 
serve snacks and meals. 
Reasonable rates. CaU 480-4614. 
42 4T 11-17 

CHILDCARE-My Virginia 
Beach home, fenced yard, 
playmates. wiU serve snacks and 
meals. WiU sit any time. Call 
340-2225. 

42-4T- 11/24 



CHILDCARE - My South Nor- 
folk home. Monday thru Friday, 
\iriU serve snacks and meals. Lots 
of toys and playmates. 
Reasonable rates. Call 543-4020. 
42-4T-12/1 



47. Moat iMprovMNMit 



wtl 



37.UlsFirSd« 



VIRGINIA BEACH<:kpe Story 
by the Sea. $29,900. By owner. 
CaU 215-752-1876 for more in- 
formation. 

3T-4T-4r/a4 



ADDITIONS^J ROOMS- 

carpentry, roofing, siding, 
stonn window, storm doors, 
plastering, electric, concrete 
work, 'plumbing, guttering, 
reawdeUng, kitchea and baths, 
brick and block work, 
aluaiinum siding, firplaces, 
caipedag painting qieckllzing 
in parkiag arau aad driveways, 
aU type of demofitimi, free 
estimate without obUg^t'on, 
inoiiii^ tfvntx. Serving aU of 
Tidewater, i^fkded and In- 
sured, State Registered. CaU 
625-7435, 623-6148. or 499- 
5516. 
47.TFM 

ADDITIONS - Rooms, gii^ages, 
.convert garages, decks, etc. 
'QuaUty work by a licensed 
buUder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
2511 anytime. 

47 TFN 



iMalSarvicM I 



5^ 



39.Pr«fM«i9MlSorvfeM 



INCOME TAX . and Accoun. 
ting (including tax auditt). Marto 
Venditti. former Revemie Agent. 
3707 Virginia Beach Bl^. ^lear 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
38 13T 1-12 

BOOKKEEPING-Monthly 

baUnce.sheet, PAL, detaifed 
trial balance from your chedcs 
and raodiXs, stubs, or rqistw ^' 
tapes. 941's and VA-5's. Up 
to 200 checkbook transactions 
monthly: '45. Payables, 
receivable, small payroU. 
Chesapeake only. CaU 420- 
6623. 

39-TFN 

BOOKING SERVICE -Induding^ 
quarto'ly payrcdl reports and 
bank account recondliation. 
^xdaUzing in smaU proprdtor- 
si<i|M. Pick up and deUvcry. 
Rcired professional. CaU 420- 
5624. 

391TN 



STOP UVING IN FEAR 

Cmnptete Tiog Trainmg: 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Licensed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in the nation. 
CaU 804-481-6999. 

48TFN 



SI. Fibitiiig 



WALLPAPERING AND 
JPA^UNTING-Fast and friendly 
service, local references fur- 
nished, Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 

51 TFN 

PAINTING - Large or smaU 
jobs. Interior ^md extnior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and Ught carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1423. 

31 TFN 



40.SfrvteM 



TYPING-AU kinds, resumes, 
term papers. 10 yean experience. 
Reusonable Rates I Upon 
request. 7 days a week. CaU 545- 
0607. 

404T.il/24 



PLUMBING'Personalized ser- 
noe. rauonaMc rates. AU typt 
repairs. Installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
terizing. Spedal rates oa drain 
cteamng. Free vi&mnm. AU 
wtH-k guwanteed, (palky work. 
CaU 497-0574. (toy or n^. 
Emergency service. PAUL 
DAVIS PLUMBING. Lkxased. 
4^rr.lI/24 



:-WiUdobcj»U> 
in my home. Bxpeioioedl in 
pKflock and tp^toly retuim. 
Pick-v and ddlvcry Mrvj^. 
C^ 545-4096 after i p.a. for 
more MorB^on m iM«. 

frnmoAUEBmi in n^t m 

^rport or iMving ^farty to ikap 
nd do errands. Qd m-4T9A. 
, #4T 11-17 

TYPING SERVICE • For 

I wnii si ns a^ indivMwte. f 
t^i a week, IMI Salable. 
RaMWrtle ntfM. CA lUhm 
«7.7iia, rM^iiini ma, or 

4014. 



BAinROOM REMODELING - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and fioor 
covning. Reasonable rates. Free 
estlmaes. 20 years expo-ience in 
Tidewater area. SmaU and large 
jobs. Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

55 TFN 



Castom Built 
Quizes 

UtiUty 
Barns 




« « « <•■■■! 
1111 llll ^1 



Stateline 
Builders 

H^Hw^yI68 
MoyodcN.C. 27958 

f91»J4S5^/l9 

Jimi^m 

HMm:m*)^J-2J06 



J 



TIRE AND RIM - F78-14, new, 
never used. $30. Call 343-Q:»3 or 
423-0722. 

60 4T 11-17 



CHESAPEAKE MEMORIAL 

Gardens. Four pave sites in 
Garden of the Word and 36 x 
13" bronze marker. Only $1,395. 
CaU 343-0226. 

60 4T 11-17 




A great Idea made even better. 

Get more of what you want a portable Iterosene 
heater for. With features like a self-cleaning porous 
ceramic wick that seems to last and last. More con- 
venience, with automatic, push.button starting. 
Plus . . . clean, comfortable heat for just pennies an 
hour! If you want oKire than just a kerosene heater, 
there's a gtowing alternative. The UL listed 
CkHTifortGlow. Reg, prj^e »259." 

NOWONLV:*209" 

Industrial Hardware & Supply 

(Wentz Hardware) 

4217 Baiiibridgc Blvd. 
Chesapeake 543-2232 



Jti 



Whenyeu 
want more 
than Just a 

kerosene 
lieater* 



sjU5xirj*'i 



lioDEtOn^ ' / 
19.500 BTJ:f, OuTbTggesl..^ 

■-output haf&ter. Completafy 
restyteS. BeM value iryline. 

A great idea made 
even better. 

An excell^t value for 
your heating dollar. With 
an amazing self clean- 
ing porous ceramic wick 
that bums clean, bright, 
hot. Push-button start- 
ing. UL listed. Plus... 
fuel eff rciency that 
delivers clean, oom-> 
f ortable heat fc>r just 
pennies an hour. 
Reg. 'ISa." 

NOW *229'» 

Indnstriai Hardware 
And S«ppl) 

(Wfnlz» 

4217 Bainhridge Blvd. 
Chesapeake 543-2232 




A p«at idMnnade 
even better. 

An eKceHent vahje for 
your tieating dollar. With 
an amazing self dean- 
ing porous cerairuc wid( 
that txims clean, bri^t, 
hot. Push-butttKi start- 
ing. UL listed. Plus... 
ftjel efRdency that 
delivers clean, com-* 
fortable heat for just 
pennies an fKXJr. 
Reg. ♦282." 

NOW *229" 

Indiislrial Hardware 
And Suppb 

(Wmtz) 

4217 UainbriUgc Blvd. 
ChrsaiHrake S43-2232 



When Something N^ds 
BuildiDg or Repaired, You N^d 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Hoi^ Im^o^^nent 
Sj^cialists 
•Building Conti«AOT«Rooff*Carpcxts*<:ktfi^$ 
•teth RnBodel«l«^OBi ^ditiomi 
• Aluminun S^^p«iUtcten RwMxieM^ 

545-7318 




imm--9-m.^M 



mm^mmmmmfm 



^^gwmmmmmmmm 



TXi Virginia Beach Sun, Novembef 17, 1982 




Kline Chevrolet 



Reports Second Best Year In 56 Years 



\^ 



^^^ ' : 


:S^ 


I^^K^ 




1^^ 











An aerial view of Kline Chevrolet s^ws the largest Chevrolet 
Dealer in the state. 



In 1981. the Kline Chevrolet dealership at 1495 South 
Military Highway in Chesapeake had their second best 
year in their fifty-six year history. Truly an incredible 
achievement in an era when most car dealers are 
struggling to stay alive. 

Just recently, Kline expanded into the Washington 
marketplace with the acquisition of another Chevrolet 
■dealership in Alexandria, making Kline Chevrolet the 
largest Chevrolet organization in the state. 

The company began in 1926 when Irving Kline 
opened in downtown Norfolk. Irving's son, Jimmie 
Kline, took over in the mid-sixties. They relocated to 
their present facilities in Chesapeake in 1974, where they 
have more land than any other dealership in Virginia. 
The Kline organization aJso operates a leasing company, 
Kline Leasing; a Ford dealership in Maryland; a 
casualty insurance compnay; and a liability insurance 
company. 



There are about 6,000 Chevrolet dealers in the United 
States, but only 200 have received the distinction of 
bemg certified as "Service Supremacy Dealer." Of 
course, Kline Chevrolet is one of these select 200, which 
Jimmie Kline feels is one of the keys to their success. 

Thompson Chosen 



"We have unfaltering confidence in the American 
automobile market, in spite of recent, national set- 
backs," Kline says. "And our expansion is my way of 
^pressing this confidence." 

According to Jimmie Kline, the decade of the 1980's 
may be the greatest ever for the car business. You can 
bet that Kline Chevrolet will be near the front showing 
the way. 



Kline Chevrolet has 
chosen Overille D. Thom- 
pson as Salesman of the 
Month for October. O.D. 
has been with Kline for 
over four years and is a 
member of Kline 
Chevrolet's Professional 
Sales Leaders (P.S.L.) 




■"''"'*¥ - 



Tough Chevy Trucks Are Taking Charge 



There's Never Been An Off -Reader Like It 




1983 S-10 Blazer 



The new-size 4x4 Chevy S-10 Blazer 
has the first 4x4 system that allows you 
to shift betwwen rear-wheel drive and 
four-wheel drive high at any speed. No 
other 4x4 system does this. Insta-Trac 
is also the first 4x4 sytem with a lighted 
acton display of the gear position. 

One-lever shifting. To shift from 
rear-wheel drive into four-wheel -drive 
high, just move the shift lever on the 
lighted shift console from 2 Wheel to 4 
High. There is no other lever to move. 
Unlike some competitive 2-lever 4x4 
system, you don't have to stop or even 
slow do wn to complete the shi ft . 

When you move the shift lever from 
2 Wheel to 4 High, the transfer cas 
divides the torque. Half goes to the 
rear axle and half to the front axle. At 
the same time, a locking sleeve in the 
front axle engages the central discon- 
nect to provide power to both front 
axle shafts. 

Shift into freewlieeling economy 
from the driver's seat, too. Shifting 



from 4x4 back to fuel-squeezing rear- 
wheel drive is simple and neat. You 
don't have to get out of the cab to fool 
with the front hubs. At any speed, just 
shift from 4 High to 2 Wheel and the 
locking sleeve will disengage the central 
disconnect, allowing the front axle to 
freewheel — reducing wear and in- 
creasing fuel economy. , 

No reversing necessary. You stop 
the truck only when shifting into and 
out of four-wheel-drive low. For 
example, to go from rear-wheel drive 
into four-wheel-drive low, just stop, 
shift from 4 Low to 2 Wheel and 
resume driving. That's it. You don't 
have to reverse the vehicle, leave it, or 
move any other lever. 

Newly patented. This brand-new In- 
sta-Trac 4x4 system is Gm^esigned 
and American-built. It is enclosed and 
protected against the elements, stones, 
and road debris. The front-axle dif- 
ferential runs submerged in oil for 
cooling and lubrication efficiency. 



i 




- End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 



We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES buying a convertible 

DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 




$iooo 

BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 




V&^ 




3443 Vu-ginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 



463-6100 



Get the Great Pair to stop wear. 

Motorcraft Oil and Oil Filter. 




SUPER SIX 
PACK SALE: 

5 quarts of Motorcraft Super Premium Motor Oil 



and One FL-1 A Filter For Only 



2717 Virginia Beach Blvd. 486-2717 



•7.70 include $3.S0rebate 
frona Motorcraft 
EXPIRES 11-30-82 



'7. 



70 



(regularly »17.00) 




KIMNACH FORD 

TRUCK SALE 



SAVE 

5500-*2000 



1982 OR 1983 

F-SERIES 
RANGER 
BRONCO 

VANS 



WHILE THEY LAST! 



1982 Corvettes 

'99.00 Over Dealer Cost 



ALL OTHER MODELS 
2% Over Dealer Cost 



KIMNACH FORD 

6401 E, Viiiinia Beach Blvd 

ami Orr Newtown Rd. Exit) 

«1-«401 



10.9% 



RK 



GMAC 
FINANaNG 

availauj: 



LyBnlNim Htwy, 
•lVa.Bn^Wvd. 

MtVMI 



fc- 



PARKER 
CADILLAC 



iMMM 




A NEW KIND OF CADILLAC COMES TO UFE.. 

WITH A SMOOTH NEW 5-SPEED... 
RESPONSIVE NEW 2.0 LITER ENGINE... 

AND CADILLAC'S ROAD-HUGGING 
TOURING SUSPENSION. 

PUT ON YOUR DRIVING GLOVE FOR 

CIMARRON '131 




5524 Virginia B^ch Wfi. 
Vi. Beach, Va, ^MSit 



THINK 



Ihktk Saybtgs 
TMnk Swrvkm 



taw 
mmjam 



^1632 



THINK 



hJ Bannmr Bukk 
Btmnmr Buhk 





amnmv 



S § § 




i9mt 



ai(VHAm( *T228 



BmtncTg^l, 



mm 



MUfH 



The Virginia Beg^ 



26 Vl64 






i^^Khmono 



I of 



'23- 



Schools 
To Study 
United Way 

By Mike Gooding 
Sun SuiT Writer 

It's not that he is again- 
st giving to charijties. but 
Malcolm B. Higgins 11 
feels that his kin^rgartoa- 
age son at Thoroughbood 
Elementary should not be 
"pressured" into doing so 
at school. 

Last WMk, Higgins told 
the 11 -member School 
Board and Superintendent 
E. E. Brickell as much. 

Higgins, during the 
regularly-scheduled mon- 
thly meeting of the board, 
asked that the school 
system do away with the 
present policy which 
allows for some soliciting 
of students for charitable 
purposes. Bayside 
Borough representative 
Duncan S. Wallace, 
saying ''there is much 
merit" to Higgins' points, 
made a motion "to 
establish a policy to not 
have United Way contri- 
butions from elementary 
students." The board 
failed to second the move, 
but on the suggestion of 
Kempsville representative 
Reva N. Kdberg, directed 
Brickell to conduct a study 
of the matter. 

"I think it is innap- 
propriate that the United 
Way is dumiing little Uds 
for money," said Higgins 
fi^^ a telephone interview. 
"*A child is not abte to 
ascotun what he is giving 
money to." 

Wg^Ds, a lawyer, says 
children are subjectied to 
"subtle pressure" 40 
dtmate to ^uritks frcm 

other stullpnts. "I really 
feel sorry for the pocM* lit- 
tte Ud who is made to 
look like a shmuck if he 
doesn't give up his quarter 
for milk money," he said. 

Board member Junes 
N. Fletcher challenged 
Hinins' contentions. "I 
thought it was a very 
positive experience for my 
fourth grade daughter," 
said the at-large represent- 
ative. "She came home 
and asked mt if she (XJuM 
give pert of hor allowance. 
This sort of thing may 
teach our children the 
sptait of giving that coiM 
stick with them for life." 

Pungo representative 
Ldand M. Hood said he 
did not "recall us having 
any policy for preuuring 
principals for soliciting 
for charities." Still, 
Kdberg said the issue "is 
worth looking into," and 
suMeiled the altoMlivc 
to Wal]a<x's motion. "I 
want a gei»ral npvt on 
wlut ejttoit to ii4^ ttk 
is gdng on in kuMte^sartei 
tiirou^ third grade," said 
Wdlw^e. "How fluuv V- 
na are being twisted?" 

"We don't promise 
cen^t ovenhoes to the 
kUs that don't pve," saU 
Joe Lowoittel, pvb^ in- 
formation director tixthe 
Khool ^sten. "Nobody, 
to my bKwtedge, has eva 
fteced a child to gi^ to 
the United Way. This tt 
the first time in the 16 
yttn tM tte United Way 
htt twoi in the td^otM 
ttatf we. tei« eve had d^ 
■^f U9d<rf<»«|MHtt". 

AMfa«ttaaI^^&s'*H 
c^t^oly eititied to his 
«|iMon," Lown^ ^d 
ftkkell wmM "look into 
^k and find out hom 
mwh WM nited in pad» 
K through thr^ and 
determiM ^n^y wM 
measures were ui^ to 
extort." Tte ttw^ tes no 
ti^^A « It, weOT^V 
to Unratthal, Umwmt, 
he mM. "Dr. Mckell 
un^By Hks w ^ to gM 
^uam wM ^m M^ of 
mta^ wkMi iiMtttt." 

te K3HXN. t^AD, ^i S 




Near Little Creek 



i Godart bHtoacto DIub and Maorcca McGiaA oa aatag the potter's wheel darii« cia« at the 

loiipfvyic laeicathMi Cellar. 

Ladies Meet Over Potter's Wheel 



Sun Correipoiidait 

Oi Monday and Wed- 
nesday evenings at the 
activity center an Recrea- 
ticm Drive, 18 ladies meet 
to form their mental crea- 
tions through the art of 
pottery. 

Mrs. Elaine Goulart in- 
structs them in berth hand 
buUt and wheel thrown 
methods of pottery mak- 
ing. Several of her stu- 
dents, Judy TtAJXtL, C3)ris 
Davis and Kathy Faille, 
have received rect^niticm 
inlocal art shows fwr pot- 
tery they have made. 

Goulart has a B.S. from 
CHd Dominion University 
and studied advanced arts 
at the University (rf Vir- 
ginia. She has been with 



the J'^iow ftcradi ^^ 
and Recreation Dei»rt- 
mpnt for about three 
years. She has taught art 
extensively throughout 
the Tidewater area. Some 
of the classes she has 
taught are batiking, cap- 
per enamelings, water 
cdlOTS, dls, acrylic, draw- 
ing and flower, designing 
using husks and silk. 

Coulart has lived in 
Virginia Beach most of 
her life. She taught art in 
the public school system 
for 12 years. After the 
birth of her soo, Peter, 
she decided to teach part 
time and went to work for 
Parlu and Recreation. 
She displays her work m 
all the local art shows. 
She also has drawings, 
paintings and pottery pie- 



A t Oceana Info School 

Naval Families Learn To Help 



Hie family and home 
have traditional^ served 
M a i^in of security, 
warmth and under- 
Mmttlg. This U eqjedally 
trw wilk tte Navy family, 
wkfeh ofkoi piayi > very 
impcffUA nde in d^- 
i^^ig a MTviM monbtf's 
au«erdediri<»s. 

S^q}pMti^ «ui undo^- 
MawUng familin are a 
ioir^ of positive 
flMNJvation to a uAw. In 
I'wogniring t^ ii^wamt 
pMMte Ae fluM^ hdds 
!■ Itavy ttfe, HAS Ooeam 
wlU sponsor a Navy 
nunUy ^rvice Infor- 
laaite SsiMk for aU in- 
^e^imA 1^ fMriHes in 
ttM "n&eimsm vsm^ Nov. 
IS^tl tan 7 to 10 p.m. 
tt^e^bs. C^asuei will 
be held in the First 
Ueute^t'i Balding. 
1527 tt Nitt Oana, awl 
t^m^imem wS be ^'- 

anniWt to Ae ftA toi 

The l^-day ^hool 
win offw titf^nuttioa on 
r^jIMi, taMefiM, and 
pili^n to ^ ^ Navy 



family, and will cover 
such topics as: medical, 
Champus, Navy Ex- 
change, comimssary store, 
wives club, pay and 
allowances, and many 
more. 



Fr^ Program 



For information, or to 
register, contact the Naval 
Air Station Public Affairs 
Office at 425-3131 or 425- 
3132. Deadline for 
SEfistratioo is November 
12. 



"December Holiday 11 
At Beach Planetarium 



The Virginia Beach 
Public Schools 

Planetarium has announ- 
(^ that its D^embtf 
prf^THi will be "lO^esn- 
\m HotM^ II." an aU 
Mw |Mfes«iMi^, 

Pki^twium hmirs an: 
^ud^, 7 to 8 p.n. Dec. 
3, 12, awl 19. Toesfteys. 7 
to S p.m.. Dec. 7, 14, and 
21. No ^nffum iHU be 

Jm. 2, and Tms^. Dec. 
28, a< tte ^v&m wiU be 

120 peoNvwd « «^ 
acce^bk from a» m. 44 



^I r«Kl by taking the 
Lynnha^m Kdt (Exit 3) to 
tte Lynntaven Parkway 
and tunywg rii^t at the 
nm rtre^ ■> ScNith Lyn- 
tkmmk Rowl * to Plan 
Ittaior High Schwrt, 
frtiee tte Planetarium is 
looted, 

Tfi^Mm ^m nuun of- 
ftxtt^BBMA^r^ 
a^o^ at M6>1971 for 
reiervatfoni. ^Utotosion is 
free. <^Otom unte- age 
12 mm te re^ed ad- 
^Mri^ nnlMt accom- 
\n a Mtturc ftx- 



Beach's First Shipyard 
Only A Handshake Away 



ocs in craft stores thr^' 
ughout the area. Her 
wOTk has been on Iohi to 
the Virginia Museum of 
Fine Arts in Richmond 
and she will be exhibiting 
her pottery at the Ever- 
green Gallery in New 
England this spring. 

Goulart plans to lecture 
and to teach pottery, 
painting and drawing this 
spring. Registraticm will 
begin again in February 
for spring classes. Y<»ith 
registratrai is February 
1st and adult registration 
is Feb. 2, 3 and 4. For 
additional informati(m call 
the Kempsville Recrea- 
tion Center or pick up a 
list of classes offered at 
the public library after 
Jan. 15. 



By Mike Gooding 
l^inSteffWriter 

Virginia Beach's first 
shipyard, a facility that 
will one day employ 400 to 
500 wc»rkers. is but a 
contract-signing cere- 
mony away from 
becoming reality, officiate 
confirmed last week. 

Jonathan Corporation, 
a Nwfolk-based Navy ship 
repair firm has nearly 
completed soil testing of 
the 30-acre site near Little 
Creek Amphibious Base. 
and is prepared to close 
the deal on the $2.5 
million property. "We 
will be signing iot the 
final purchase of the land 
during the first quarter of 
1983," said Admiral Vin- 
cent A. Lascara, a vice 
president for the com- 
pany. Added Harold R. 
Gallup, Virginia Beach's 
industrial development 
coordinator: "It's a go 
situaticm." 

The Virginia Beach De- 
velopment Authority in 
July approved Jcmathan's 
KO.OOO option to purc- 
hase the land which once 
served as the southern 
terminus iat the Kipto- 
p^ke ferry linking South- 
side Hampton Roads with 
the Eastern Shore. The 
property will be develop- 
ed gradually, accwding to 
corporaticm President 
Gary M. Bowers, who said 
he expects the facility to 
become "one of the most 
mg^rn shipyards in the 
^iKSN^ted to M»e ov- 
' >^rlHittl and iep^ d 
Navy ships." 

Lascara said that the 
first plase of the project, a 
metal fabricaticm build- 
ing, could be operational 
within a year. "As lot a 
timetable for the rest of 
the yard, it's hard to 
say," he said. "It reaUy 
all depends (m the accel- 
eraticm of business." 
Lascara added that busi- 
ness (Might to be good, 
because the Department 
of E)efense is committed, 
he said, to building a 
600-ship Navy in the com- 
ing decade. 

He said he does not 
believe the layoff of 1,300 
employees at Norfdk's 
Norshipco plant will affect 



Jcmathan's expansion to 
Virginia Beach one way or 
another "becuise there is 
a shortage of Navy ship 
repair capabilities in the 
Norfolk area." However, 
Lascara said the competi- 
tion to win Navy contracts 
is going to be tough. 

Lascara, a Virginia 
Beach resident, said he 
was "pleased" with his 
dealings with Virginia 
Beach government offi- 
cials. "It was fine wwk- 
ing with City," he said, 
adding however that, 
"the price they gave us 
was reasonable, but they 
didn't give the property 
away." 

Jonathan already oper- 
ates an electronics and 
ccMuputer facility in Virgi- 
nia Beach, at the City's 
Airport Industrial Park. 
'"We were already very 
familiar with Virginia 
Beach!" he said. The 
other fiKtor influencing 
the company to expand to 
Virginia Beach was the 
land itself. "The site is 
ideally suited for amphi- 
bious vehicles," he said. 
"We just thought it was 
excellent for our pur- 
poses." 

By expanding, the com- 
pany hopes to reUeve 
crowding at Jonathan's 
shipyard in downtown No- 
rfolk. The facility is 
primarily invdved in over- 
hauling Atlantic Fleet ves- 
sels as part of the Navy's 
experimental AFS phased 
Mi^tenance ProgMm. 
LasoMa ejipUyMd diM te 
the p9Si, the Navy tradi- 
ti(Mially brcnight its ships 
in fw overhauls every five 
years ot so, requiring up 
to nine mcmths of tuning 
up. Under the new pro- 
gram, ships are sent in for 
overhauling once a year, 
thereby reducing the am- 
ount of time they stay 
idle. 

In the past year and a 
half, Jonathan has per- 
formed repair work on the 
USS SanDiego, the USS 
Omcord, and the USS 
Sylvania. Lascara noted 
that all the over-hauls 
were completed "on-tune 
or ahead of schedule, 
below estimated cost, and 
without any major quality 
deficiencies." 

See VIROINIA BEACH. Page S 




ltic"TlicVii^BiaBcw:h 



Pro Boxing Returning 
To Virginia Beach Club 



Professional boxing will 
return to Virginia Beach 
next month at Revue's on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
according to promoter 
Stanley Bennett, presi- 
dent of Surf Rider Sports, 
Inc., of Virginia Beach. 



Heading the Thursday, 
Dec. 9 card will be Vir- 
ginia Beach's own light- 
heavyweight, Ric "The 
Virginia Beach Bomber" 
Lainhart. With a recwd of 
5.3, Lainhart will go eight 
See BEACH. Page 3 



Boxing In The Bars - 
AMatterOfA.B.C. 



By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

Virginia Beach boxing 
promour Sta^y Bennett 
doesn't care if the boxers 
who battle cm Thursday, 
Dec. 9 at Rogues are 
bare chested or wear tank- 
top shirts. The fights will 
goon. 

The Virginia Alcohol 
Beverage Control board, 
through its local agent, 
will permit profess icmal 
boxing at Rogue's provid- 
ed Bennett has a prcHnctt- 
ers' license and that the 
fights are sanctioned by 
the Virginia Athletic Com- 
mission. Both provisions 
have been met. If the 
provisions are not met and 
the fights transpire, the 
club owner could lose his 
A.B.C. license. 

As to whether or not the 
boxers will be permitted to 
box without tops, how- 
ever, has not been deter- 
mined. A ruling on the 



questicHi is expected by 
the end of this week. 

Virginia A.B.C. law sti- 
pulates that if a nightclub 
serves jnixed drinks, men 
md women employees or 
performers must have 
their chests covered. The 
regulation does not apply 
to beer bars . Also at issue 
is whether ot not professi- 
onal boxing is entertain- 
ment or spOTt, which is 
also expected to affect the 
A. B.C. board's decision. 

Recently, The Sun att- 
empted to canvass local 
legislators over the 
A.B.C. laws. On dead- 
Une, only four out of five 
could be reached. 

"A lot of the A.B.C. 
laws are ridiculous," said 
General Assembly Deleg- 
ate W.R. "Buster" 
O'Brien, "and I think that 
a lot of the regulaticms are 
arbitrary. 

"But on the other 
See A.B.C, Pages 




JuMs wmA hk mother Kerry pet Pi^^kM 

Horse Show Set For Princess A nne 



Year-dd Robert Imu^ "B.J." Nathan in Ira mother. 
Kerry's, arms tea^lve^ touches Portion, a slww 
jampttammAhfQmk^otkt. F^flknwfllbestownn 
M A«Mri»m Hone ttow Assodatton Anrated stow 
•^]wcred by PriMets fmut Famas. L^., ami teM m 
fti i^oor arena on Lai^k» Bridge Road on Nov. 27 ud 

28. 
Top rklers uid iKnes on the East Coast stow dn^t 



art expec^d to nxnpete "on tte fttt" and over the b% 
brush anl pole fences. Vuiinia Bevh rklert wiU ne 
the show u one irf the hut o^Mrtimities M> i 
points to be used to detent Ae V^^ 
Horse ^ow's ewl-(rf-3«ar a««nb. 

The show starts toUi dajn at 9 m tte monrii^ i^ is 
fiee ami open to the iMb&;. 



M 



2 V^ijiihi Bffh Swi. WowAcraf, 1912 

Sun Coiiiiii«nlary 



Editorials 



Kids Can Be Tough 



A Virgiilia Beadi parent remonbers 
with chafrin the subtleties of peer 
pressure be encountered as a lad. Upon 
reaching adulthood and producing his 
own offspring, he naturally wishes to 
spare his duld the same experience. Kids 
can be tough on one another, to be sure. 

The father, Makohn B. Higgins II, ap- 
peared before the City's school board last 
week in hopes of alleviating what he 
believes is the "arm twisting" of his five 
year-old son at Thoroughgood Elemen- 
tary. 

Mr. Higgins' interest springs from a 
practice in the Virginia Beach School 
system which he labds "inai^ropriate:" 
the soliciting of the city's 56,000 students 
by the United Way. "Children, par- 
ticularly kindergarten^s, are not in the 
position of knowing what they're being 
asked to give to," Higgins told the 11- 
member board. Neither does he feel that 
the school system should be a collection 
agency for a solitary charity. 

He says he is not against giving to 
charity. Rather, his concerns stem from 
what he feels is the "dunning" of young 
children who do not know any better. 
Further, he asserts that children who are 
either unwilling or unable to give will be 
ridiculed by their classmates. Said 
Higgins: "TTiere is a certain level of 
pressure a child may not be able to 
resist." Higgins asked the board to repeal 
its 16 year-old policy of allowing the 
United Way to seek student support. 

After Dr. Duncan Wallace, the board's 
Bayside representative, failed to get a 
second on a motion to do away witii the 
practice, the question was fmt to the 
board: "What is the United Way all 
about?" 

'Briefly, the United Way is the support 
organization for 63 charity s^^cies in 
Southside Hampton Roads. Among the 
groups which benefit from the United 
Way are Big Brothers, Big Sisters, Boy 



Scouts, Girl Scouts, Red Cross, Goodwill, 
and Tidewater Rape Information Service. 
This fall, the United Way raised more 
than $24,000 from Virginia Beach stu- 
dents, more than $11,000 of which came 
from the purses of ^nnentary school 
pui»]s). 

A second, overriding question pointed 
at the board: "Is the giving to charities by 
children beneficial or detrimental?" The 
answers vaired. 

Members Wallace and James N. Flet- 
cher debated the practice's merits. While 
Dr. Wallace concurred with the sentimen- 
ts expressed by Mr. Higgins, Mr. Fletcher 
said that asking children to donate to 
charities is a good ^notional learning ex- 
perience "that could stick with them for 
life." Added Vice Chairman Robert H. 
Callis, Jr.: "What we've got here is not 
broken, and I'm not interested in Hxing 
it." Superintendent E. E. Brickell said 
this was the first such complaint he has 
received regarding the United Way. 

At the urging of Kemi»ville represen- 
tative Reva Kelberg and Chairman Roy 
Woods, the board asked Brickell to look 
into the matter further. After that, what 
will be the net result? 

The hope is that the board decides the 
opinions of Mr. Higgins have some 
valkhty, even though he is a lone disinter. 
The United Way seems to be a most wor- 
"thwhile institution, and the agencies it 
serves are in sore ne^ of money. 
However, there should be a better way of 
raising capital than to look to young 
students. Obviously the school system 
never intended to place undue pressure 
upon its children. However, board oieoiP' 
bers could search the inner confines of 
their own memories, remembering the 
immense peer pressure to which 
youngsters are sometimes subjected. 

Kids can be tough on one another. 

M* M. G» 



Fair A.B.C. Laws? 



The consumption of beer was legalized 
in Virginia in the 1930's. Liquor by the 
drink wasn't passed by the General 
Assembly until the 1960's. And if some 
legislators had their way, booze over the 
bar would still be illegal. 

Thus is the reason that men may apose 
their chests in Virginia bars that serve 
nothing but beer, but not in bars serving 
liquor. In other words, the Alcoholic 
Bevo-age Control laws are strict^ on 
nightclubs serving liquor than on those 
serving just bea. Beer, legislators say. 
had been around for a long time. No need 
to tighten the screws on its consumpticm. 
Liquor, on the other hand, an alcohol 
popularly and aron^usly po'ceives as 
being more dangerous than beer, has been 
more tightly regulated. Consequently, 
male go-^ dancers w1k> pranced around m 
nightclubs whidi wave mixed drinks must 
eavm thdr chests with a vest or t-shirts. 
&idi is not the case of the nightclub only 
serving bea*. 



The discrepancy makes a mockery of 
this particular A.B.C. law. 

It's intent is to protect the public, or 
certain sectors of it, from what may be 
considered obscene or lewd entertain- 
ment. 

But the troublesome question is 
whetho- or not professional boxing is en- 
tertainment or sport? It's both, and 
dq)ending on your moral values it may or 
may not be obscene and lewd. No doubt, 
a professional boxing match with a state 
titie on the line is a sanctioned sport. If it 
is abo considered entertainment by the 
A.B.C. Bottrd, however, it is not permit- 
ted in bars which serve mbu^ drinks 
unless the boxers covers tiieir chests. So 
much for realism. 

If beer bars can l^^ly hc^n)d3aiqrtt is 
unfair that bars serv^lg mixed drinks 
arm't afford^ the iune right. And what 
about prof^sional body bmtding? Ento-- 
tainmoit or spent?— G.D.G. 



Shipyard Welcome 



While it's true that it wmi't 1» 
producing nuclear-powered aircraft 
carrioi and subnu^nes, tl^ Jonathan 
Corporation's forthcoming Virginia 
Beadi sUi^wd to, nwiethdcti , a bocm to 
thedty. 

Tte fadlity wiO be cta^ted as a major 
ov^tewl ^vd for tihe Itevy's AFS ctais 
veiieli. Tht i^M «A mmi^V »»« ^n 
4n toi^ n^MS. evMd Oe dty'f tts 



diti^mal revenue. Jonathan offidab say 
th^ e3q)ect to pouritt tei^ $10 nuOicm in- 
to tte Virgiilia Baxih ecoiKmiy m ossung 
^ars as tte ^rd u ^e^^optd to its 
worldngpcMeitttL 

Virginia BetnA b» ^>od reaacm to be 
IB-oud of its tot-evCT iUj^raird. Its td- 
(tttioa to ^ dty ftirtho- <^m^rti^a to 
tiK «^ thitt ^S^ ^aek te m^ed • 
sottitf place tm ii^wtrial grmrth. 
I.G. 



Letters To The Editor 



Reader In Favor Of Library 



Editor: 

I am writing in leqjonte to the Bcacwi's vlicle oe 
Novonber 14 about the propoied new Wbtvf and/or 
museum. 

I am voy much in faw of a new cottrd fibmy 
beouoe 1 use the ia»ary a kit nd 1 think it b oae <rf the 
niceA Anofi about ^^^tma Beach. 

I have lived in lldewitfer for 72 yean. My tale 
husband, Hciify, was on the nanmng Coaunaskn, as 
wdl as ay brothcTHn-law. Sammy, I keep mfomiMl 
ab<wt dvic atfairs and can qspredate the City's posWoB 
on caqioidibira for caiHtal inqxovements. BW I teod to 
i«ree irith Mayor Jraes tlwt the peo|^ wonfai want a 
new litwaiy and if it were put out on a refercndtmi, it 
wouU probaMy carry. 

I use the Blende Iteanch Library most of the time, M 



it is in my ndghborhood, but I've been in the new 
nmuies aad tUnk that their spaciousness and modem 

oonvadcaccs are just lovefy. I see the young people 
fcacttig in the cowtyard under the skylights and know 
how th« mnst/iyoy the amenities provided there 
(wUcb wl oertaiBfy £(ta't have when I was growing tq>). 
Fk«»i a "fatunk perspective" I've seen a lot of 
changes in Virginia Beach, particularly in the last ten 
years. IMke to think that we arc keeping up wiA the 
times and nu^w fctti^ ahead of them otxasionaHy. I 
hope the Hbiaries win Gontintte to grow because they 
give so mndi pkmuK and free ednotticm to evoybody. 



Mrs. Mary Eicbelberga, 
Virginia Beach 



Police Officers Deserve Protection 



Editor: 

The statteics sean to indicate that the incideaoe of 
assaults on poiioe officers are i^ing lU a hmrcndous 
rate. Every year, mart and mott of them are being tt- 
tacked mady became of the unif(»in they wear. Recen- 
tly, we've aitnessed the brutal duxMing of mie nidi of- 
ficer in ViiiMa Beadi. Ow ommionwealth's attorney, 
Paul Sdortino, has hit the nail on tiie head in saying 
that such acts are bom out of sheer meanness, and diey 



WK figuring more than cases of individuals lasliing out 
^junrt society. 

It seems to me diat we need to s<»ndiow provide more 
and bMer ptotecti(m*for our pdiconen. I dont know 
how. but I do h^ that this is something which geU t(q> 
primity with our rtate legidaton «^ien they next con- 

Willie T.Andrews 
Virginia Beadi 



Is Football That Important? 



Editor: 

It scans to nM that AmCTica has a very misguided sen- 
se of moral imorities. Evidoice of this can be found in 
scanning tlirough the pages of our local metropolitan 
daily newspaper. Catdiing my eye was the front page 
last Wednesday and a large, banner headline 
proclaiming the aid of the Naticmal Football League 



l^a^'s rtrike. Thb story was givm more prominence 
than the ectHMwqr. the rdcase of Lech Walesa, 
Prendem Reagan, and the rdum of the Space Shuttle 
Cc^unbia. 
Is footbaD really aO that impcvtant? 

Lor^ta S. Dunkavy 
Suffolk, Va. 



Roads Are Dangerous 






a*- 



Editor 

Nothing takes your breath away during a drive 
along our highways like some tnickdrivers who 
tries his best to run you off the r<Nid. I'm not 
talking about piekuf», either. The big rigs are 
dangerous enough without being driven by 
liioitiics. 



I've nearly been run off the road Iwk-v in tlic 
lusi week, ir il keeps up. Tm going iti liuvc lo gel a 
truck or my own jusi lo earn .vomc rcspecl by thoiw 
dangerous truck drivers. I sci<loni sec I hem trying 
to run each other off the road. 

L. Madiiion 
Cliesapeakc 



r 



Turkeys: The Best Bet 



San 
Flower 




Today's turkey tops Ae list of best eoeat biqn, both 
ntttritionally aiul eoaMrak»lly perfect for casual fiunily 
meals or festive holiday dining. 

How Big ShoaM The Whole IMvy Be 

tf you aUow at least IVi pountb of turioey per person, 
^m'U be assured mnterate kftovers. Sbtes of 
rea(fy4<H»ok tiii^ ttuteys in the grocery stOR or 

^r'^""*** — "f* frfma.6. fV> ^^ pmuMJ. atiH laryitf 

Itawiig liw Whde IMiay 

lemw turkey in ordinal bag Md we one of the 
foOcmum n»ttods. It is importtitt to k^p tlw 
^UB^ntaut km emingh to allow &e Mrkxy to thaw 
oompletdy white keepii« the aatakk swfKe itt a m^ 
t^^ierature. 

•fboe on tny in reftigeratar far 3 to 4 <fai^ C24 horn 
for msk five pornvb of tx^ee^. Tlun^ ia ite 
f^r^B^^ at 35 to 43* FnoAeit b Oe Oomt bA 
prefeneS OMthod. 

•Itav^ at room temperttue speeib ^ tte 



IHOcess tmt place the turioey in two dosed l^owniMqier 
bags (tnie used in pocety stares) to keep temper^ure 
of ouulde sur&oe of twtey low enoi^ for safety white 
insides diaw. Ilwwing time is shortened to about half 
of refrigenUor time. 

•When Mcessary if time is running out, hasten 
thawii^ ai bird partial defh»ted by the iU>ove\ 
nMdMxb 1^ iriadng inookl water to ooiwr and dmging 
the water fieqpMitt^. Never use warm or hot water. 

If you are going to stoiff the bird, do it ^t before 
roasting. AUow about H oip of staffing per pound of 
turisey. 

Never freeae n anoooieed, stuffed turkey or a 
roasted, stuffed turkey. Yon should remove any teftover 
stuffing from the oucass mid r^rigerate immediittely 
after tiK nwid. 



Whote Wrcto are proceued so they're ready for the 
oven iHi» yen Inor ttoB, Roiove plastk: wrap from 
tlunivd h^ey. BHBOve g&tett and nedc from the body 
and nedt «vkk». To mMve tlw md^ it may be 
neoMttty tt> ralnse tte 1^ from tte band of skin or 
wire iMdc kidL BfaM« the taib^ inside nd omi with <»d 
««ter, Aen pat dry irith a p^ier towel or dean doth. 
Betum tegs to bode lock orbaad of skfai, or tte kxjsefy. 



Ftaoe tmtey lse«t-tklr«p m red m shalfow op»i 
raw^ pm. tf aaNtt A^rmoai^er tt n«i, imert b»o 
eei^ of ttritifk a«a to be# aet MuA^ boM. FiKe a 
"traf of M^w^^ fofl, shiny skle doim. looMfy ow 
^rtey topr^mtt iwer bniwi^. Bont ta 3^*P. 0^. 




Letters Welcome 

Jtoiritf «r«vi4 tfMMf ip0e^ Mtf Ah 
^ter A« m^m mam ^Nw 1^ 

am4 ^0^mn^ rA, 3M33, 



Virginia B«u:b Sun, Novemt^r 27, 1M2 3 



Key To Directing: Knowledge Of Life 



if> 



Lfiz Sills remembers when Virginia Brach Lit- 
tte Tlitottre KauW i^^'to tiAWrie hi *^its' 
waiting rooms, hotel lobbies and in bath houses. 
She recalls going to gas stations and restaurants in 
search of actors and actresses to peif onn in up- 
coming productions. 

Sills, 73 years young, has directed a total of 16 
plays for the VBLT, dating back to 1961 when she 
was summoned to help puU the flegdling theatre 
group "out of the htAt." 

"There were not enough peoplf around who 
knew anything about theatre," says ^Us, who 
directed "The Glass Menagerie," now running 
through Dec. 4 at the Little Theatre of Virginia 
Beach. "There was not enougli enthiisaism to get 
it going." 

Two years before the Virginia Beach Borough 
and Princess A3ax» County mierg«l in 1963, the 
VBLT i»esented its first performance in the Ox>ke 
Elementary School. on tilth Street. Stages wo^e 
erected Uie evening before opaiit« night, and 
plays continued to be pr^ented in the local 
schools until art patrdns rented space in the "old 
courtyard" on i7th Street across from the Roxx 
restaurant. This arraAgeiRent bsted until 1971 at 
which time the new Little Theatre of Virginia 
Beach was built at its present location on the cor- 
ner of 24th Street and Barberton Avenue. 

"We used to be real amateurs," Sills, a Virginia 
Beach resident since 1942, said. "We have very 
high standards now." 

As a rule, musicals' can be counted on to fill 
local Theatre houses. But Sills is one of a few rare 
directors that can pack 'em in with a drama. 

"I've been very lucky with my dramas," Sills 
said. "But there is a good foflowing in this area 
for Tennessee Williams' plays." "Menagerie" is 
the fourth Williams play Sills has directed. 

The VBLT tries to balance its schedule of five 
plays a season with a combination of musicals, 
dramas, and mysteries or classics. 

"We want to keep the audiences more varied," 
Sills said, "Mid we wairt to keep the shows decent 
for the family." 

Auditions at the VBLT are always open. There 
is never any precasting, Sills says. About fifty 
people auditioned for "Menagerie," but atten- 
dance at the tryouts varies from play to play. 

"There's an awful lot of people coming out," 
Sills, a thMtre lover wnce 1936, said, "but it goes 
in waves." 

The VBLT relies on the talents of many young 
service people, Sills says, to n»ke up the casts, 
along with drawii^ from a regular pool of local 
performers which mipate between Norfolk, Por- 
tsmouth, Chesapeake and Virginia Beach. 

Between 60 wid 70 hours of rehersal have gone 
in the two-hour production of "Menagerie." But 
because Sills' cast of four in "Menagerie" are all 
adulte, she finds very few problems with the actors 
and actmies attending the rehearsals. 

"This cast is very mature and come anytime I 



call them," Sills said. "And they don't want to go 

If the director u good, the finbhed product, the 
play, should go off opndng night withcHit a hitch. 
To the audtence, the pCTfomwrs, script, lightins, 
sound and stage changes should aU progress with 

the minimum of eff(Ht, Or SO it seOBU. 

Wl»n the curtain rises, the director's job, for 
the most part, is finbhed. The hours of rehearsals 
and labor finaUy culmimUet in a presentation 
which, to untrained and trakied observers, looks 
easy. If the spectator is distnK^ed by falling s^ or 
wa^ed mov(»amt on stage, his or her mind vM 
not be allow«i to concentrate on the play't 
nwwwe ot theme; and inMead of fedUng a cathar^ 
at the play's inclusion, the viewa, if he doesn't 
walk out first, will feel drained. Watching a Uve 
theatrical production demands that the vkwer get 
invdved with the play, relate to the performns' 
character, and the actors win in turn work harder 
while on stage. 

To Sills, the key to directing evcdves from the 
p^ceptions aiul observations ^e has gained over 
her years of into'actuig with peiople frcmi all walks 

ofUfe. 

"The key to directing is a knowledge of life," 
she said. "Over my life 1 have studied dance, art, 
writing, singing and I have traveled. But I have 
always enjoyed obsoring people. I was never 
talented in uiy way. All 1 did was become part of 
the background and watched how others 
behaved." 

Sills considers herself a "creative director," one 
who doesn't decide what specific direction in 
which to move until she discerns how much, and 
what type of talent she will have from which to 
draw. 

Is directing a play hard to do? 

"None of its easy," Silk said. "The most en- 
joyable aspect of it, however, is painting a picture. 
1 consider that my artwork. The director, after all. 
should have a picture of what is needed. The nicest 
and easiest part of directing a play is being with 
the people you're tavolved with." 

Sills says the hardest pvt of being the artistic 
directOT of a play is assuming the responsibility of 
also being the play's producer in charge of 
production. 

"That puts a big load on the director," she 
said. 

Sills learned her craft from Rose Johnson 
WiUis. founder of the Norfolk Little Theatre. SiUs 
worked with Willis for five years and worked on 
about 23 shows with her. I^lls was also play direc- 
tor for eight years at the Country I^y School in 
Virginia Beach. 

"The Glass Menagerie," will run at the Little 
Theatre of Virginia Beach weekends through Dec. 
4. Friday and Saturday performances begin at 
8:30 p.m. and a Sunday matinee on Nov. 28 will 
have a 3 p.m. curtain. Assistant dkector for the 
show is Kay Bircher. For reservations call 428- 
9523. 



^rrm^t^rrRn '^tA -?hRn5i 



Oobblo 
Hlpfhoso 



NEW DIET COKE 

$139 $J79 



2 Liter Bottle 



Six Pack 
12 oz. Cans 



$199 

Six Pack 
160Z.N.R.B. 



MUrr 



MILLER BEER 
6 Pack 

»2.19 



Bowl of 

CHILI 

12 oz. COKE 



Not AvaOldile 



990 J 

bridle At Holbud Rd. 



16 dz. PEPSI 

Non-returnable 

1.99 



i£i 



Mrs. Smith Pies 

Buy one at r^;ti^ 

price and get the 

second one at half 

price (6 Flavors) 




Joto our QUICK MART 

COFFEECLUB 
To he&me a oiemb« 
buy a mug liUed with 
coffee for 9^. This 
month spedal for mem- 
bers... muf flUed with 
coffee 19( 




HOtJDOgS AUThcWay 
m^ FOR^^ T 



Prices Good til 
December 1, 1982 

Weekly 
Speciab 

3 LOCATIONS TO 

SERVE YOU: 

Great Bridge 

Cornered Cedar Rd. 

ABatUefieldBlvd. 

482-3181 

Churchland 

CornnofHighSt. 

ATyreRd. 

483^25 

V«.Bewh 
Conui Of Rosonont Road 
And Holland Road 

463-0602 




Du LakeimB, Liz SUb UMi Dorothy loM> dvriag Kceat ratowli 



Stories By Greg Goldfarb 
VBLT President's Goal: 
To Pay Off Mortgage 

**It's very difficult for me to under- 
stand why, with the level of performance we 
have here, why there aren't lines of people 
outside the theatre for every performance," 
said Ed Hurd. pre^dent of the Little Theatre 
of Virginia Beach. 

Obviously, Hurd, a trust officer for 
Virginia National Bank, is very proud of the 
performances and plays the VBLT offers. 
And he should be. 

The 180 seat theatre, located on the corner 
of 24th Street and Barberton Drive, was 
built 11 years ago after an initial $SO,OOC 
loan was secured. The loan was refinanced, 
and the remaining balance is^$21,000. The 
value of the theatre now, and its equipment, 
is $150,000. 

Hurd is very pleased with the number and 
type of plays being offered by the theatre, 
noting that last year 2,000 people came to see 
"The Student Prince" during its four-week 
run. He also mentions that juggling advance 
ticket reservations and keeping tickets 
available for those who come to the door on 
the night of the show can be tricky. But to 
Hurd, these concerns do not loom heavily on 
his brow. His primary goal is in another 
direction, which, when realized, should 
bring the little theatre to new heights. 

"Each little theatre president leaves his 
mark on the theatre," said Hurd, who is ser- 
ving in his second term as president. "Some 
get the theatre new lights. Some get new sets. 
My ambition is to pay off the mortgage." 

Hurd adumbrates that after the theatre's 
debt is cast off, it will aUow the VBLT's 15 
n^oiber board kff directors the freedom to 
spcMd th^ revenue it goMiiales on more im- 
provements to the theatre, and on the ad- 
dition of new equipment, such as a revolving 
stage. 

The VBLT receives some funding from the 
Virginia Beach Arts and Humanities Com- 
nussion, and in general terms, the theatre is 
financially solvent. The theatre boasts a con- 
tinuing membership of approximately 200, 
who each pay $5 a year in dues. The mem- 
bers elect the fifteen-member board of direc- 
tors to three year terms. The president, two 
vice presidents (business and production), 
treasurer and secretary arc elected from the 







VBLT Prnideiit Ed Hard 

board of directors to one year terms. 

"There are no ego trips on the board,** 
Hurd said. "It is an active, working board.' 
All board members become committee chair- 
persons." 

No one, creativdy, administratively, or m 
production receives any payment for their 
scvnce to the theatre. 

Hurd, a monohuU sailing enthusiast and 
actor, says the goal of the theatre is to get 
more local residents coming to the produc- 
tions, and to auditions. 

"We are looking for more attendance 
from Virginia Beach residents at the shows," 
be said. "Our plays are designed to appeal to 
the Virginia Beach community, except our 
summer musical which we hope wiU attract 
tourists as well as locals. We feel that this is a 
tremendous value to the Virginia Beach 
Ml cottununity: We ^^so try. to use as many 
{ ! r young jeoDle ham, frpm ^l»e over t^e 
summer that we can. 

"We don't think of ourselves as a clique 
or as a select group by any means," Hurd 
continued. "We're always looking for new 
people on stage and for production." 

Hurd also reports that people from as far 
away as Canada call the theatre in the spring 
to make reservations for the VBLT's sum- 
mer show. 

Upcoming plays at the VBLT include 
"The New Moon," an operatto; "Mornings 
at Seven," which just closed on Broadway: 
and "Death Trap." 



"Menagerie" Cast All From Virginia Beach 

^ • •• ■ Beach has a lot of growing room, but m the 





The caat of "The Glass Menagerie" in- 
cludes two men and two women, all of 
whom are Virginia Beach residents. 

Dorothy "Dot" Jones, 50, is a librwian 
and plays the part of "Amanda Wingfield." 
Jones has been a Virginia Beach resident for 
28 years and has been a performer for 20 
yMTs. She has appeared in eight plays at the 
Little ThMtre of Virginia Beach. 

Jones describes her character as very 
flighty mother who lives in the past. She lives 
in bygone tunes. She is poverty stricken and 
is trying to her kids to do something with 
their life. She doesn't grasp reality 
sometunes." 

Jones mjoys acting, noting "it s a fan- 
tastic recreation for me. I forget all my other 
worries when I'm on stage." 

Her thoughts on the Little Theatre of 
Virginia Beach and the arts in Virginia Beach 

in genial? 

"It's fantastic," she said. "The reason I 
ccmtinue to come back h«e is because of the 
warmth I feel from tte audience and from 
the people. The Virginia Beach Little 
Theatre has been successful for a very long 
time and it really meets the needs of the 
community." 

Oudy AitoB, 28, is a professional actress 
and has been a Virginia Beach resident for 
seven y«tfs. She has been a performer for 16 

years. ,, 

Aston plays the part of "Laura, 
dau^^ of Amanda. She descnbw hw 
duuacter as "v«y introvated... lives in a 
dreamworld; shy, physically crippled and 
lives in Uw world of the gla»meni«erie." 

This is Alton's first appearao* in the Lit- 
tle Theat« of Virgnia Beach, iwt she 1ms 
done m^i dinner theatre and television 
* work. Sfce tad this to say about acting: 

"I enj«v it. I tove the peopte I work with. 
I've dMK a lot of televisiori. so taving a ive 
audience is a wonderful thing. Virginia 



last two years the arts in Virginia Beach has 
grown by leaps and bounds. For example, 
we now have Shakespeare at thePaviUon." 

Dan Lakemaa, 35, is an accountant and 
has been a Virginia Beach resident for two 
years, but he grew up in Lynnhaven. He has 
been a performw- for 14 years. 

His character is "Tom," brother to 
Uura. He decribes his character as "trap- 
ped, resigned to that entrapment... and in the 
end of the play he is the narrator trapped in 
reality. He feels there's a way out of it; he 
wants to believe in magic. " 

This is Lakeman's second show at the Lit- 
tle Theatre of Virginia Beach. 

He likes performing "to better define my 
own character; to understand the world I'm 

in " 

Lakeman feels ' 'Virginia Beach is a good 
area for the arts, without so much 
professionalism that people feel threatened 
by it. The little theatre lets the <»nMnunity 
participate in the arts." 

Gene Cordon, 29, is a minister and 
evangelist and has been a Virginia Beach 
Indent for 18 months. He is from Bath. 

N.C. 

He makes his theatrical debut as "the gen- 
tleman caller," but adds that many times his 
preaching borders on being a dramatic per- 
formance. 

He says acting in a theatre is som^hta^ he 
has always wanted to do. He also said m^ng 
"is a yroU hobby and I enjoy it. It exiMnds 
me. I «ioy learning and I enjoy people, aiul 
tearing ttan laugh. " 

Conco'Bing the »:ting experience, he said, 
"whore I've been in the {Mst is on (xmpmt- 
lion to this. I'm thriUed to work with Liz 
(ails) and with the Little Theatre of Virpnia 
B«K:h. I feel honwui to be a part of dih 
l^y and this tl^^r." 



StOM, Qv WMi« A Ow ^MV 



TEXACO 

Ope« 24 Hewi A IHvi Op«i Se^ »V» A Wtdt 



"The Glass Meni^erie" Dedicated To Two Theatre "Troopers'* 



The littte Theatre of Virginia Bearii's 
^oduction of "The Glass Menagerie," directed 
by Liz SiUs, has been dedicated to C^i Cki live^^ 
aiKl Vi Ragan, both long tune memben df the 
little Theatre erf Virginia Be«;h. Both woolen 
ited cS can^r. 



"Itey were twogr^t ladies of the theatre, and 
real troG$>en," said SiUs, who annoni^Ml tta 

dedicatioD. ^ . . .w — 

Oii Chi Lively's httstand Ue designed tM set 
for tte VBLrS pioductfo* of "Tlw OlMi 
Menagerie." 



^k^H 



dkAi 



A^KB^M^BAaM^^M^mttaMMifiaaaaii 



4 Virginia Beach Sim, November 27. 1982 



Efit^rtainmefit 



*TheNew Virginians* 



Lawson Joins Performing Group 



Paul Stephen Lawson. 
scm of Dr. and Mrs. Paul 
Coleman Lawson of 152 
Herdon Rrad. Virginia 
Beach, Va., has achieved 
a position on the New 
Virginians performing 
staff for the 1982-1983 
season. He will be sing- 
ing second bass and will 
be featured in the "lida 
Rose" quartet, and "Go- 
nna Build a Mountain". 

The New Virginians is a 
musical entertainment 
group from Viginia Tech 
ccmsisting of 26 singers 
and dancers, 13 female 
and 13 male, and an 
11-piece show band. 

Their director John 
Howell, assistant musical 
director Paul Breske, and 
chcM^eographer Pam Tur- 
ner have arranged a show 
of Broadway hits, lap 40, 
: country, and patriotic 
' songs for this season's 
entertainment. 

Laws(Mi, a 1982 gradu- 
ate of Kempsville High 
f School, received the Tho- 
; mas Jefferscn Book Awa- 
rd from the University of 
: Virginia naming him the 
■ "Most Outstanding Stud- 
i ent" for 1981. He was 
awarded a bronze medal 
from France iot placing 
first in an essay contest in 
the Ycvktown Bicenten- 
nial, selected at Virginia's 
Boys State to be the 
Senate Chaplin at the 
Inaugal, nominated to 
Who's Who Among Ame- 
rican High School Stud- 
ents, and a member of the 



Nati(»al Honn- Society. 

This eighteen year crid 
was in the misicals "Ann- 
ie Get Your Gun", "West 
Side Story", "No. No a 
Million Times No", and 
"Music Man". He was in 
the Hcnors . Choir, the 
Regional and State Chw- 
us where he won a schola- 
rship for a IS day Europ- 
ean Oncert tour with the 
Virginia Chorale. With 
the Kempsville High Sc- 

ForDec. 12 



hod Show Qi(»r. he was 
able to perform with Miss 
America in the Miss Virg- 
inia BeiM;h Pageant. 

Besides all the schod 
activities, he found time 
to be a sdoist in many 
church musicals and in 
the Regional Church mus- 
ical Handel's "Mes- 
siah". He is the soo (tf 
the pastes of the Spurgeon 
Memorial Baptist Oiurch 
in Norfolk. 




P.A.'s Marching Cavaliers Win Several Trophies 



The Fabulmis Mardiii% 
CavaUo- Band from Prin- 
cess Anne High school 
recently traveled to Cary. 
North Carolina to com- 
pete in the 24th annual 
"Cary Band IHy." 

Forty-one tends com- 



peted hi parade and fMd 
show competition. 

The Cavaliers, under 
the direction of Mr. 
J<Mq}h Ligart, earned a 
superior rating for music 
and received a second 
place trophy in Ohm A. 



Th^ also won trophies 
for "Bat Horn Une" and 
"Best I^iun Une" and 
wore hmiored when Uie 
judges rated them 
"Second Place OveraU" 
frma the 40 otho- bands in 
the field show com- 



petition. 

Tlw band will end its 
fall mwching season 1^ 
presenting the half-time 
diow for the Joy Fund 
Annual Charity Bowl at 
C.E.L. Stadium on 
Thanksgiving Day. 



Roxx Changes Format 

The "Atlantic Avenue" At WorreD Brothers Restaurant 



LawsoB 



Braille Library Benefit Slated 



Original music and mul- 
ti-media presentations 
will be featured in a 
benefit concert fix- the 
A.R.E. Braille Library, to 
be held on Sunday, Dec. 
12, at 2 p.m., in the 
A.R.E. Library/Confer- 
ence Center, 67th Street 
and AUantic Avenue in 
Virginia Beach. 

The program is head- 
Uned by "M«Tiing Star," 
husband and wife team 
Bill and Lynn Purse, who 
will be showcasing their 
new album. Chris Van 
Cleave, composer and 
musical director of "The 
Davids (Hi Affair," will al- 
so be performing. In 
addition. Tidewater Vir- 
ginia Beach residents will 
be introduced to the origi- 
nal music of Sharon Ja- 
mes and Chris Fazel, ac- 
companied by Mark John- 
son. James and Fazel 



have recenUy moved to 
Virginia Beach from the 
Los Angeles area, where 
they were the founding 
producers of the "Still 
Small Theatre." Visual 
effects will be provided by 
Beth Agresta, professio- 
nal photographer. 

The A.R.E. Braille Lib- 
rary lends braiUed. large- 
print, and cassette tape 
books to any visually han- 
dicapped individual, htt 
of charge. Membership in 
A.R.E. is not a require- 



ment for Braille library 
use, and for those who 
must bcM'row their mater- 
ials through the mail, 
postage is free. Curren- 
tly, there are 800 people 
nationwide using this ser- 
vice, which is sustained 
primarily through c<mtri- 
butions. 

Suggested donation for 
the benefit cmcert is $3 
per person. Tickets will 
be s(rid at the door. Fot 
more information, call 
428-3588. 



Jesse C. Young At Peabody's 

Jesse Colin Young will appear Friday, Nov. 26 at 
Peabody's, 21st Street and Pacific Avenue, at 8:30 p.m. 

Chorale Christmas Carol 

The Virginia Beach w Sunday, Dec. S at 8 

Chorale will present p.m. in the Pavilion 

"Christmas Carols." a Theatre, 
concert of holiday music. 



Student Creative Corner 



a 



Life In These United States" 



"AUantic Avenue," a 
five piece Top 40's band 
will appear at Worrell 
Brothers Restaurant this 
Wednesday, and Friday 
through Sunday at 9 p.m. 

The announconent was 
made by Fred 

Hollingsworth, director of 
advertising and publicity. 
Worrell Brothers. Inc., 
Virginia Beach. 

Hollingsworth said 
"Atlantic Avenue" will be 
the restaurant's full time 
house band, indefinitely. . 
The band will play from a 
stage on the club's second 
flow, overlooking . the 
first floor dance floor. 

This is the flrst live en- 
tertainmoit on a regular 
basis, HoUingworth said, 
that WorreU Brothers has 
ever schedule. Why the 
change from its traditional 
disco format? 

"To broaden the 
scope," Hollingsworth 
said. 

Band members in 
"Atlantic Avenue" are 
from Norfolk and 
Virginia Beach. The 
restaurant is located on 
Atlantic Avenue. 



On a similar, but dif- 
ferent note. Roxx restau- 
rant on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, just a few 
blocks down from Worrell 



Brothers, has channel its 
live entertainment rock 
format to difco and a 
sound system. 
The conversion, it is 



t( 



Three Little Rabbits" Set For Children 

and older on Saturday, 



"Pentronella" and 
"Three Little Rabbits" 
will make up a one-half 
hour film program for 
children three years of age 



Dec. 4 at 2 p.m. at the 
Kem|»ville Branch of the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library. 



reported, includes bet- 
ween $30,000 and $40,000 
in new sound equipment 
and lights. 



Adults, parents and 
children may obtain more 
information about the 
film series by calling the 
tibrary at 493-1016. 




tillage "l^olynesiaii 
MR. CHRISTMAS FIR TREE 

PRE-ASSEh4BLED 



• («)|«<ANCI»S IGMSEni 

• TAflf nrSlSTANT 

• SIANOMCIIUO 

• Nim AtlllK4NH: 



• HAMl KIAiCANI 

• (VUSfAOLE STORAGE 

CAnroN 

• l«ii*il S Vm Wiwailv 



mn A^iiUMnMLNT of ucins AjOhnaufnts 



POLVNeSfAN 






NEW HOURS: 
WMkdays: »« PM 
S«L V^ mi StM. 12-4 




2980 Virgmta Beach Blvd. 

Virginia Beach 

340-7121 



iD 



These two easiqrs W« «oi^4^ate4 bytttih grade teacher Shari Martx, Windsor Oaks tJemeatary 
School. The tlicnw of the essays is "Life In These United States." 



Life In These United States 



)-k- 



My name is Missy Graul. I am a fifth grade 
student at Windsor Oaks Elementary. 

I would not have been able to choose to go to 
this schod if I were not free. That is one reason I 
appreciate the Declaration of Independence, 1 
love freedon. I am aware that I could not be free 
if it weren't fOT sddiers risking their lives for me. 
Also, 1 am aware that I could not have freedom of 
speech, freedom of religion, freedcnn of beliefs or 
jobs. 



I am glad I am fi-ee and that I can believe 
anything that I wish. It is very nice here in the 
United States. I also know that you could not ask 
for a nicer place to live. I know I am one of the 
luckiest children in the wwld. Not because I'm 
spoiled, but because I am free. 

By Missy Chaul. age 10 

daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Graul 



I'm Glad That I'm An American 



I'm glad that I'm an American because we get 
freedom to do anything, like freedom of election 
and religion, speech, press, to a fair and speedy 
trial. But most ofall freedom of education. Life in 
the United States is full of freedinn, but one thing 
you can't do, that's break the law. 

We have freedom to a fair and speedy trial. It's 
nice to have freedon but if we had no hiw there 
w(Mild be many crimes. I'm glad our United 
States is organized. I'm also glad there's people 



VhiMB 



who want to help the United States. I'm glad the 
Navy, Army, Marines and Air Force are not 
careless abbut the United States. I hope more 
pec^le volunteer to help the United States as we 
grow. 

. ByEsperlie Laborete, 

age 10, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. Esperidion Laborete 



to The 



iu.l3IS. 
httcFritej' before. 




1^: 







Gcor^ Crawf ordU Morning Team 



FOR EVERVTHING YOa NEED TO KNOW. 




Brass Rubbing 
Exhibited 

The Eastern Shore 
Chapel of Virginia Beach, 
2020Laskin Road, is now 
featuring brass rubbing 
exhibiu from 9 a.m. to S 
p.m. Monday through 
Saturday and from 1 to 3 
p.m. on Sunday. 

The exhibitions and 
workshc^ will ok! on 
Saturday, Dec. 11. 

Fix tKxt mf&naadoa 
call42S-0U4. 




FAMOUS THANKSGIVING DINNER 



MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

AttMrMT 
At 



N«f«lk,Va. ^Ml 



// 's the same price as last year, the same 

fresh Rockingham turkey as last year, 

the same delicious baked Smithfield ham as 

last year - We felt that since you enjoyed 

it so much last year, vthy not do tks^same 

this year. Serving continuously from 

U:30a.m.- 10:30 p.m. 

Choice of: 
FMtOv CUdt 

OnaaeJaicc Toaa 

Choice of* 

RoMt Princess Anne Twkcir 

with Cluppendate Dressing Mid Cibla G^vy 

Baked Luters SmithfteM Ha^ 

With Champagne Sauce 

Pfektes 
CaadMd Yams Green Pe» 

Ceiffy $C SO Olives 

Cranbmy&uoe ^* HotR<rils 

CMfrM's Portions *2.7S 



THE 



Circle 

Va. 




to Keep You Out 
Of A Jam. 

Every 

morning, 

Mon.-Sat, 

WQH-13 broadcasts a 

tolaJ of 1 1 up-to^nute 

traffic reports. One for you 

every 13 minutes, to and 

firom work. Listen, and get to 

where you're going, on time. 

Our 
Accu-Weatiier 

Kee|»YcHi 

Ahead erf 

'^f^tm^i,^. JVtottier N. 

Eveiy morning, 
Ak3n:-S^WQH-t3 broad- 
casts a tdal di 25 occlusive 
Accu-Weather iiQx>rts. Rain or 
shine; H^en and you ^M be 
sure to know, before it 
happens. 



TWs Week's Secret 
TovS^tt 





For WIk), What, 
Where, When, Fast 

Every morning, 
/vk)n.Sat, WGH-13 
b ro adcasts a total of 13 
news euxl sports reports. 

Who did what to whom and 

when? Listen, 

and you will 

know the 

news. 

ForMu^c 
That You KiK^. 

If you're driving ak)ng, you will 
be singing alor^. If you're 
with a friend, you 
will be tappir^ 
yoiM- toes. The 
music is the 
rha^ of \^H-13. 





Ttm Wedc's Seo-et 

Pe»(»aUtyIs 

toaiSeott 



,* 



J 



iViWi 



VinlnbBeacfa Sun, November 27. 1982 5 




School Board Addresses Milit^, Redistricting 



Danny Kippcra, ktt, Ifatena as LinAi qreene and Brcnda hUBer explain the pilot program to Mayor Lonk Jono 

TRIS, Girl Scouts, Police Start New Programs 



Virginia Beach Mayor Lonis Jones recently 
loined Virginia Beacii Police Sergeant Danny 
Kappers and Tidewater Rape Information Serr- 
ices Education Coordinator Linda Green in 
selecting a design for pntolies to be won by girl 
soNits who participnit ta pflot programs on home 
security and personal safety. 

Kappers has already conducted four home 
security programs and will conduct fonr more by 
the end of December. Green's scl»diile of 
pr<^rams mi personal safety mfrron Kappers', 
but are conducted mi dMferent n^hts. 

All the giri scouts participating in the program 
are from the Green Run, Carper, Chimney HUl 
and Saiim Woods sections of Viiginia Beach. 

Kappers estimates that by the conclusimi 9t the 
series of programs, between 300 and 400 girl 
scouts Involving between 20 to 30 troops will have 
been addressed. Kappers also repmrts that the 



Virginia Beach Police Department wU also begin 
a bicycle safety prt^ram in May. 

These programs evolved from efforts by Bicnda 
MUler, a local girl scout leader. She said that 
there had been many burglaries near where she 
lives in the Green Run, but it was a rape that 
motivated her to contact Kappers six or seven 
months ago to learn of any public pri^rams 
offered by the police department on rapes and 
home security. If these programs prove 
successful they will be expanded to Include hll 
Viiiinia Beach Qri Scouts. 

Mayor Jones said the pilot programs were "$ 
commendable project. The safety of Our childreli 
and of all the people in the community is 
important." 

Kappers in charge of the Virginia Beach Police 
Department's Crime Prevention Unit. 



STORE WIDE SALE! I 

• 10, 20 And 50% OFF •_ 

(EXCEPT CONSIGNMENT ITEMS) 




»«' 



I 

z 

< 
as 

s 

z 

z 



MOTHER and CHILD 

• nori'prqflt t^tq^tion - 

is an unusual 'thrtfHgm' 

o/fertng matoTtity wear, 

a wide ra/^e of baby tueds 

from newborn to/nt-teen 

handicrafts and gifts. 

M^ are low, 

qwMty is high 

and the caux is worthy. 

Tlu^u^ifop&vkedby 

tUdkoM whrntfen. 

BabyfunUture 
maternity tmd beriby dottus, 

- iftnt^coiuHtkm - 

are aa^ted on ctm^nnmnt 

wm 

tax ^iuctible donations 

to the quality stock of 

MOTHER and CHILD 

Newmdhmd-madeartit^ 
a^fed^ wekomed. 

AU^ecmbsui^ort 

BrRTWRKSHT 

intts/^^mmeyaaykx. 

PROmo^MOTmKmid CHILD 

PROgremMtnaUGHT 

PRf^aUFS 



2 






Lee Cahill's Council Report 



Because of the Thanksgiving holiday, resulting in 
early news dcadUnes, Lee CahiU's City CouncU report 
on Council's Monday. Nov. 22 night meeting wiU be 
pubUshed in next week's issue of The Virginia Beach 

Sua. 

City Council does not meet on Monday, Nov. 29, as it 
is the fifth Monday of the month. It will meet again on 
Dec. 6. 



Snyder In D.C. 

Virginia Beach resident 
Edward B. Snydo-. an 
automobile executive, 
recently served as a co- 
chairman for a special 
benefit dinner in Washing- 



ton, D.C. honoring 
business leader and art 
patron Frederick R. 
Weisman, of D.C, for his 
contributions to the field 
of mental health. 



(SALEENM^.S) 

MMhw m^ tMd, ite. 
Pr^t^s Am§ Ms&t 
VI^MiBm^Uvd. 



LOCArtONBn'l^ 
■EHIND ROCXIM^ IfMtSE REST. 

fiorftvMrif^fmmton 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 



Exclusive franchise in America's most 
profitable and dynamic industry is being 
offered for the first time in this area. 
International company will place qualified 
individual in "Turn Key" busings, train 
key people, provide inventory, finance 
your customers, and imy you thousands 
of dollars "up front" on orders where 
your customers pay only on future energy 
savings. Existing customers of our 
tamchisees reads like "Who's Who" of 
Fortune 500. ' 

If y(m qualify, you wiH be flown to Los 
Aisles for a tour of installations and 
perMnal interview. Minimum invratm^t 
of •25,000 cash required. Call President at 



THIS IS NOT AN OFFERING TO SELL 



Continued from Page 1 
In total, the Virginia 
Beach school system 
raised more than $88,000 
for the United Way in 
1982. Of that, some 
,169 was donated by 
students. Broken down 
further, more than 
$11,000 was given to the 
campaign by elementary 
students. The United Way 
is an umbrella 

organization which o^r- 
sees 63 charitable 
organizations. The United 
Way is the only charity 
which is permitted by the 
School Board to solicit in 
Virginia Beach schools. 

MUltary Tuition 

Also at last Tuesday's 
meeting, the board recin- 
ded its plan to charge the 
federal government 
tuition for students who 
live in tax-free military- 
sponsored housing. 

The policy change 
followed notification last 



week that the U.S. Deparr 
tment of Education is now 
willing to pay half of the 
$5 mflUon in impact aid 
earlier earmarked for 
Virginia Beach public 
schools. In June, the 
board voted to bill the 
Department of Defense up 
to $1,125 per pupil for 
students residing on 
military installations if 
impact aid dropped below 
expected levcb. 

Some 4,800 of Virginia 
Beach's 56,000 public 
school students reside on 
federal property. Impact 
aid is designed to compen- 
sate school systems for the 
local tax revenues that 
servicemen living on base 
are nOt required to pay. 

Congress in October 
passed a continuing 
resolution, setting impact 
aid at the previous year's 
level. Virginia Beach is 
slated, then, to get about 
$5 million. However, the 
resolution expires on Dec. 
17, and it is uncertain 



exactfy kom ^pf^ moiMiy 
Qmfrcls wittaliN fortte 
aid. 

•'I'm aild^i^f^ to 
show an evt^mst ^ food 
fidth," BtmH^ toU the 
b<Mtf d befm^e Mking it to 
repeal its June policy. 
"By our Dec. ^t meetlns, 
we ought to taoffH what 
Congress is fcrfng to do. 
We can rcsdad it now, 
and if we 4oa't like what 
Congress do^, we can re- 
institute it. I ^m't mevi 
to be cute with you, but 
we want that $2 million." 
Wallace moved tot adop- 
tion, and the board passed 
it unanimously. > 

Redistricttaii 

The board heard from 
five Virginia Beach 
residents opposed to 
school re-districting. One 
of them, Peter Hennesey 
of Kempsville, told the 
board that the dty needs 
an additional high school. 
He suggested that Bran- 



(ton Junior High be con- 
«^ed into a Mcondary 
school. "Your allusion to 
Aaf pomWHty is umter 
study and is a possibility," 
Mkl ^kkeU. A plan for 
the changing of school 
districts should be drawn 
up by early December, the 
superintendent said. 

In other actions, the 
board: 

•Appointed Diane 
Judge, president of the 
PTA at the Center for Ef- 
fective Learning, to the 
Special Education Ad- 
visory Committee. 

•Awarded the contract 
for construction of West 
Kempsville Elementary 
School to Womack Con- 
struction of Virginia 
Beach. Womack had a low 
bid for the job of 
$325,000. 

The board will next 
convene in formal session 
on Tuesday, Dec. 21 at 2 
p.m. in the Board Cham- 
bers in the Municipal Cen- 
ter. 





Jonathan Corp. overhaub USS Coacord at Hs Norfott aidnrard. 



Virginia BeaehEntering^^Mariti^^ 



Continued from Page 1 

Gallup says he is happy 
to welcome Jonathan into 
the city's industrial fold. 
"We had a lot of offers to 



sell the property, but none 
were as good as this one," 
he said. "In terms of job 
generation and capital in- 
vestment, Jonathan seem- 
ed to have the most 
potential." 



The additicm of a ship- 
yard to Virgina Beach 
does not mark the beginn- 
ing of new era of maritime 
industry in the city, Gal- 
lup said. "There is just 
not a great deal of shelt- 



ered harbors in the area," 

he said. 

"Even though 

we have 38 miles of 
shoreline, you have to 
remember that the Atlan- 
tic is a pretty rough lady." 



Arts Center Elects Five New Trustees 



Five new members 
have been elected to the 
Board of Trustees at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter. The group includes 
Homer W. Cunningham, 
John M. Davis, Richard 
H. Kline and R(%er M. 
Pierce of Virginia Beach 
and EdwinC. Kellam of 
Norfolk. 

Cunningham is also a 
member of the Virginia 
Beach School Board and a 
c<msultant with Beverly 
Enterprises. Davis is the 
Directs of the Design 
Divisicm at the Atlantic 
Division of the Naval Faci- 
lities Engineering Com- 
mand. KUne is on the 
Board of DirectOTs at Vir- 
ginia Beach General Hos- 
pital and First and Mer- 
chants Bank as well as 
President of RK Chevro- 
let. 



Pierce is Vice-President 
and Regional Manager of 
Cox Cable Communica- 
tions, Inc. and on the 
Executive Committee at 
the Virginia Beach Mari- 
time Historical Museum. 
He is also on the Board of 
Directors of the Old Dom- 
inion University Intercol- 
ligate Foundation and the 
Virginia Cable T.V. Ass- 
ociation. 

Kellam is an attorney 
with the Norfolk law firm, 
Kellam, Pickrell and Law- 
ler. 

"We are pleased to 
have these high quality 
individuals join our 
team," said Mrs. Hohnan 
C. Rawls, President of the 
Board of Trustees. "The- 
ir proven abilities to deal 
with complex business 
matters will be an asset to 
our program." 



The Arts Center, now in new building on an 11- 
its 30th year, is develop- acre site along the Toll 
ing plans to craistruct a Road in Virginia Beach. 



A.B.C. Laws 



Continued from Pace 1 

hand," he continued, 
"That's no place to have 
boxing: in bars." 

Newly elected delegate 
Julie Smith said she 
would have "no problem 
with (boxers) being in a 
nightclub with thdr trunks 
on and no tops." . / 

Smith also said^ "it's 
ludicrous," that A.B.C 
rules c«»<«rning the «- 
posure of men's chesu are. 
different for beer bars and 
nightclubs serving mbced 
drinks." 

"I think it's crary that 
they can go on a beer bar 



and box but they can't box 
where they serve mixed 
drinks," she said. "It's 
ludicrous." 

Delegate Owen Pickett 
said he always "consider- 
ed boxing more of a sport 
than entertainment." 

Delegate Glenn McCla- 
nan said he"would see 
nothing wrong with box- 
ing as entertainment at 
establishments serving 
mixed drinks. It would be 
alright." 

Bennett added that the 
fighters will wear tank 
tc^s "if we can't get 
around it." 



Beach Boxing 



Dr. Qmries M. Ewing 

Pc^iatrist - Foot Specialist 



ANNOUNCES 

The opening of the Kempsville office. 

' Specializing in Sports Medicine, 
Surgery and General Care of the Foot 

For Children and Adults. 



HMHtby 
Apprtitomit 

PhoM: 495-1277 






,VA 234i4 



Continued from Page 1 

rounds with John Green 
of Richmond. Another 
Beach £avorite s<m, Pete 
"Rocky" Harris, wiU tan- 
gle with Bobby WaU oi 
diesapeakt in a six-round 
tight heavyweight pre- 
liminary. RjCNuading out 
the Beach «mtingent is 
"Smoking" Ricky Butts, 
who wiU square off again^ 
St Qiesa«)«ak9's Vincent 
Allen in a fsur-itmnder. 

Other bmitt slated tor 
the evening include: 
"Downtown" Fre<klie 
Brown of Noif[^ venus 
"Big Mae iteack" Mc- 
C«ineB at WiiUaftoo. 
D.C. in as eight round 
light-hM^^rwcitkt mi^h; 
and Jote Pwd f^ ClMsa- 
peake iwows Tc^y Snith 
of i^^ttaMvA in a fix- 



round middleweight fight. 

"AU the fights are very 
evenly matched," says 
match-maker Mike Vaug- 
han of Virginia Beach. 
Vaughan, who also mana- 
ges Lainhart and Harris, 
says Virginia Beach fans 
"are in fn- a great night of 
boxing." 

Tickets should be avail- 
able this week at the Surf 
Rider Restaurant and at 
Mary's Country Kitchen, 
both located on Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Price 
f<v general admission will 
be S6, and ringside seats 
wiU be available. 

Bennett, who Imt large 
sums of m«iey <» two 
previous Ixmng endea- 
vors at the Pavilion last 
sanmer, has invested 
$3,000 in the Dec. 9 event. 



i^MAAAiMi^ 



«p 



mmmmm 



wpvqpi 



6 Virgiiik Beach Son, Novonlicr 27, 1M2 




AChristmasSak 
that ghies them 

somethii^to 

talk about! 

For the perfect Christmas gift — consider the gift that keeps on 
giving. Giving someone a phone can save them money on their 
monthly bill by eliminating equipment rental charges ($2 fw 
rotary sets, $3 for pushbutton sets — charges higher for 
premium sets). And now until Christmas you can save as much 
as $96.00 on that distinctive style of phone for those favorite 
people in your life. 
Just check our list. 



y/;.-'- 

'• /* ^ 



. ah 



TkonitoB 



Thornton A Standout Th&Coi^mtalCknstnasGilltUsttiSKm^ 



At Chowan College 

James Thornton of Damille Street in Virginia Beach 
is a member of Chowan College's 1982 football team. 

He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Thornton. 

Thornton is a 5 '9" sophomore linebacker, weighing 
i9B pounds. His record thus far includes 37 tackks (23 
of the solos); one quarterback sack and one deflected 
pass. 

As of Nov. 9, 1982, Chowan College had a record of 
6-3-1 . The coUege is located in Murfreesboro, N,C. 



LeGavy, Kerrigan 
Lead MWC Soccer 



Elden LeGaux and 
Peter Kerrigan, two 
Virginia Beach natives, 
and their Mary Washing- 
ton College socoa team- 
mates finally discovered a 
way to conclude their 
season on a high note. In 
the initial three seasons of 
the two seniors' careers, 
MWC has closed the 
season with a losing 
record and no postseason 
play. 

In 1982. both of these 
negative positions were 
reversed. With both 
Kerrigan and LeGaux in 
the starting lineup, the 
MWC Blue Tide placed 
second in the Eastern 
College Athletic Con- 
ference (ECAC) South 
Region Tournament to 
end the season with a 9-7-1 
record. 

Both Kerrigan, a 
graduate of Bayside High 
School, and LeGaux, a 
Kellam graduate, played 
vital rotes in the team's 
success. Both were ^ar- 



long starters at midfield 
where they were able to 
use tlwir experience on 
both offense and defense. 
Offensively, Kcrrigait^ 
totaled three assists and 
LeGaux padded his career 
leading assist total with 
two this season bringing 
the total to nine. Defen- 
avdy, "Peter bccanw a 
good defensive player this 
season," Coach Roy Gor- 
don said. "He is a 
tenacious tackier and can 
run all day." About 
LeC^ux, a team captain, 
Gordon continued, 
"EJden guards wdl. He 
makes up for his lack of 
physical skills with ex- 
cellent positioning and in- 
telligent defensive play." 

"We will miss both 
Elden and Pete next 
season," tlK sixth ^ar 
coach explained. "Both 
are fine all around iria^n 
who provided us widi both 
skill and leaderslap this 
season." 



Ocean Park Women 
Host Christmas House 



"A Christmas House" 
will be sponsored by the 
Ocean Park Woman's 
Cub, Wednesday, Dec. 1. 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at 
4536 McGregor Drive 
(Larkspur), in Virginia 
Beach. The site is the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. 



John W. Douif^' 

Home-baked goods, 
handmade crafts, needle- 
work, stocking stttffers, 
Christmas items, and arts 
and crafts will be <m sale. 

Don^ion for tour of 
home is $1. 




TONY 
GRIFFIN 



AND SONS 



U-CALL. WE HAUL FOR YA'LL 

TOP SOIL 

GRAVELFILL SAND 

CLAM SHELLS-ROCK 

WASHSAND-HARD FILL 

AND FILL DIRT 

«7-5569 

CALL 24 HRS •? DAYS A WEEK 



A* Conten^ira^ sleek style, designed for maximum 

VERSATILITY AND CONVENIENCE 

Rotary (n»g. $63.95) sate $49.9S/S8i« tU.OO 

Pushbutton (reg. $79.95) sale $^.96/saiw $14.00 

Contempra Teriia^ genuine italian leather covered 

CONTEMPRA LIGHT AND DARK BROWN LEATHER. 

Rotary (rag. $109.95) sale $79.9S/save $30.00 

PuahbuHon (rag. $134.9^ sale $99.9S/ra«e $35.00 

B. Rip Phone I' compact, light weight, space age 

DESIGN. FITS ANYWHERE 

Pushbutton Only (reg. $45.95) . . sale $35.95/sa»e $f 0.00 

Flip Phone Holster for WaN Mounting 

(reg. $8.50) sale $4.50/save J2.00 

Flip Phone Leatherette' plush leather cover in 

MAHOGANY OR SADDLE TAN COLORS 

Pushbutton Only (reg. $76u95) . . sale $».95/saiw $17.00 

C. CraiMePhone* the look so popular in the twenties 

AND thirties A STYLE AND COLOR TO FIT EVERY DECOR 

Rotary and Pushbutton 

(reg. $1^95 - $173.95) . . sale $129.95/save up to t44J00 

D. DoodteRione^ created for convenience equipped 

, WITH HANDY PAD AND PENCIL 

Rotary (rag. 72.95) sale $59.95/saiw |#3 40 

Pushbutton (rag. 88.95) sale $74.95/sa*vtf 4.00 

Bean Bag Pouch Converts OootNe into a Kangaroo Poueh 
— AH Models (reg. $16.90) sale $14J0/S8ve $2.00 

E. Empress Standarcf elegance 

R<rt»y (reg. $89.95) sale $76.95/saw $73.00 

Pushbutton (reg. $112.95) stfe ^9.96/saiw S13.$0 

F. Empress Delme' a touch of french styling 

Rotary (reg. $1».95) sale $12«.95/sa«e $11.90 

PushbiMon (rsg. $145.95) sale $134.95/save $77.00 

G. Chestphone' gives the appearance of 'a fine 
accessory the ultimate refinement of a telephone 

CarvedWMnut 

Rotary (reg. $139.9^ sale $99.95/save $40.00 

Pushbutton (rag. $154.95) sale $109.95/S8v« $45.00 

HunSng Scene and CNppw Ship 

Rotary (reg. $148.95) sale $109.95/sm« $37.00 

Pushbutton (rsg. $159.95) sale $119.95/saw $4O.#0 

H. CamMesflck' a classic in demand by nostalgia 

buffs, the phone AMERICA GREW UP WITH 

Rotary 

(reg. $89.96 - $84.M) sale W^95/ssve (^ to $29.00 

Puahbutton 

(reg. $109.96 - $114.95) ... sale $79J5/S8«e i^ to $35.00 



»$86.95/s«fe $34.00 
i$99.9&'s««$35.00 



K. Character 
PhoneLamps* 

FUN AND FUNCTIONAL 
YOU LOVED THEM 
ASPHONE&NOW 
ENJOY THEM AS' 
PHONE LAMPS. PERFECT 
ANYWHBUE. ESPECtALLY 
UNDER THE TREE 

Mtokey Mouse,* 
Snoan k Woodstock* 
and Winnie- Hto-Fooh* 
Rotary (rag. $173jq 

sato $139.9S/s«fe $34100 
Puahbutton (rag. $183.95) 

aato $149.95/s««« $34.00 

L.* Alexitfider Qtfwtmm 

PtaiM^ BOLD AM3 ORIGINAL. 

THE EXTENSION PHOf« 
THAT^ a CONVERSATION 
PIECE IN ITSELF 

Rolaiy Only (rag. $119i9S) 

I $99.96/saw $2ftO0 



M. 



CifCtef^ione' a step 

INf O reikflORROW THE 
TEMPORARY LOOK TO 
ACCENT ANY ROOM. 

Rotary (rag. $109.95) 

sate $99.96/sav« $70.00 
Pushbutton (rag. $121 J^ 
$111.96/8Me$fOLOO 



Rotary (rag. $119J6) 

Pu^ibimon (rag. $134.95) . 



I. Dawn* St«TLE enough to be DIFFEIKNT AM) DISTINC- 
TIVE AN EXTENSION PHONE TO CO»«njMENT YOU 

Rotary Only (rag. $98.96) sate $75.96/s«« $23.00 

J. Diploinat* the picture of succe^ ideal for the 

STUDY OR office 

Pushbutton Only (rag. ^6JS) . . sate $79.95/SMe $77.0» 



4teo Off 9MJE you'll find phone accessories such as adapters, exterttk}n canSn and shoulder rests. If you're still 

puzded about wftat to gi\re, Pfione Fair alsoti^ a gift certif Icale tar anyttt^ in ttw ^kxe. 

All tale \VBm» vxA. listed. Sale Prices Limited To Beijing Stock. 




FOR THE PEF^ON ON THE MOVE. 

^HMSOnic KXT-1510 automatic Ai«««RAf«} 

RECORD unit 

(rag. $219.96) sate $179.96/saw $40.00 

N. Panasonic KXT-1515 automatk: answeri'record 
with remote. 

(reg. $229.96) Mte $ia8LS6^8Wi $4000 

O. GTE Sp^ricerphone WITH mute AM) VOLUME 
contrck. 

Rotary (reg. $1«l96) sate ttOiie/saw »a00 

PualriMftton (lag. $1MJQ sate $119itS/saw »OlO0 

P. AmeilcanTiriacoiiimiinic^ionsAiflomirtic 

Dialer with digital number display. »%aker AND call 
tii^kr. 

•16IMter(i«g.$a«6.K)...... satetM8J6/« 

#32 Oteter (rag. $299.95) sate $238L96^nv« MOOO 

Q. Freedom P t ion e ^ cordless tb.epho»c stay in 

touch WMBtCVB) YOU GO. 

Frasdom PImmm'* 200 

(nag. $12t.96) sate $88l9S^8W ISftOO 

Viritaiie Conlral HatK i oe t s fits any standak) 

PHOf^ FULLY MOiSULAa 

iyiCotors(ros.$CL96) sate $36^S/sav« $7UI0 



lieemmtinicatiQim Coif 4 i 
« woemtek It/mm CM/MACTIK 



MMrtM ot MorMvm TtkKom 2 
fMft UMM>« ffHim SmMicMt. inc 





■^ifcii ^'m^rm^f^^'^ 



Virgini» Bew* Sun, November 27. 1982 7 



f^ 



The Real Estate Professionals 



For 1983 



No Bleak Economic Forecast 



Pyle Realty doesn't believe in bleak 
economic forecasts. In fact, during their 
first 2Vi months, they've attained a sales 
volume of several million. This success is 
no accident... in addition to a wealth of 
experience and talent, Pyle Realty has a 



reputation for in-depth knowledge, atten- 
tion to detail and good old fashioned ser- 
vk». They also believe that talent^, 
knowledgeable salespeople with a good 
product will be successful. They are 
hiring! They welcome realtors who share 
dieir philosophy. 



Kings Grant Landing 










Quality brick townhomes prestigious 
neighborhood. Wooded Lakefront - 
Special Financing. From $59,300. Model 
463-2550. Nights, Alice Pyle 340-6441. 
10 Brick Models open daily - Noon 'tU 
Dark. 




LAND'§ END 




THE ELEGANCE CONTINUES, 
CCNMING SOON Luxury Condominiums 
6 blocks from Oceanfront, Built by Lands 
Assodates. Priced low 40's. Nights Ann 
Hargroves 425-7142, 460-1777. 




SALESPERSON OF 
THE YEAR ALICE 
PYLE, a broker, is 
Tidewater Builders' 
Salesperson of the Year, 
with $4.5 milUon volume 
in new home sales. She 
has been a member of 
the Million Dollar Sales 
Club since 1976. 



MILLION DOLLAR 
SALESPERSON 
ROGER PYLE, A 

broker, has become a 
Million Dcritar Salesper- 
son. He is also a Naval 
Aviator, and former 
Base Conmiander of the 
Armed Forces Staff 
College. 





Presents Home of the Week 

Lake Smith Terrace 

Enjoy spacious, elegant living in this 1 Vi 
Vear old, better than new, 3 bedroom, 3 
bath home in a quiet, prestigious neigh- 
borhood. Deck, screened breezeway, 
privacy fence, many elegant extras. 
$19,900 assumes VA Loan. 4$(^i77X, 



PWj^- 



To Buy Or Not To Buy 

Courtesy of Pyle Realty 

Is now really the best time to buy a home or 
should you wait? Lets analyze. What are the 
reasons for waiting? 

1. You could afford higher payments later. This 
is a valid reason if you arc expecting a significant 
increase in income, or perhaps an inheritance 
soon. That would enable you to afford a better 
quality home in a better location. 

2. Interest rates may come down. Not a good 
reason to wait. Most economists agree that the 
days of single digit interest rates are over and tax 
benefits are structured so that mortgage interest is 
deductable. If the interest rate came down to 
nVi'^t from the current FHA rate of 12% your 
payment would be 19 tax deductable dollars per 
month less on a $50,000 mortgage. 

3. Home prices may decrease. Not likely! We 
have just been through 2Vi yeafs of the most 
depressed housing market most of us have ever 
seen. Even in that bad market, the bricks, boards, 
land and labor, all the things that it takes to build 
a house, either held their value or increased 
slightly. With the current increase in house sales, 
price increases are inevitable. 

Now lets look at some reasons to buy now. 

1. Interest rates have already come down 
^gnificantly, more than 5% in the space of a few 
monUis. Mortgages are affordable now. 

2. Prices are down. Builders with inventory have 
shown good judgement in not increasing prices 
even though there has been an increase in sales. 
However when that inventory is sold, the new 
homes will cost more because the bricks, boards, 
land and labor will cost more. 

To summarize, it appears that this is a special 
time in the housing market. Interest rates have 
just come down, and prices have not increased. 
Tax benefits favor the homeowner and the overall 
value of the home will probably continue to in- 
c i<<xeaae each yeai as 'm the past. 



Buy Your Future...Today! 



HUNTERS RUN 

AT Green Run ^ 

Priced from Dl,3rUU 

DRAKES RUN 

at Green Run 

Priced from •39,950 

BARKLEY MEADOWS 

AT Green Run 

Priced from •7X,54U 



Your hwne for tomorrow is being built today by Affor- 
dable Homes, Syled for beauty and comfort... construc- 
ted for quality and energy efficiency. Designed with 
today's buyer in mind. Affordable Homes feature a 
^de choict of options in finished ihd unfinished areas, 
enabling you to have it aU now or plan for the future! 
DIstiiictive exteriors, formal dining areas, bright, fun- 
ctional kitchens and exciting floor plans to suit your 
unique lifestyle. 

AFFORDABLE HOMES- 
AFFORDABLE LUXURY 

Buy yours today. . . for tomorrow ! 

VA-VA GP.-FHA-VHDA & CONVENTIONAL 

LOANS AVAILABLE 




REILTT carp. 

424-3720 



^i> 



Homes And Choice 
Building Sites For Sale 



Bill Barlow 

487-1668 



OiffOrd 

Key People In IMewater Real Estate 




Buddy Huskey 

487-6167 



m 



MOVING? 



We won't carry the furniture, but we can help 
carry your toad of problems. 

Moving to a new home, cross town or cross 
ccnintry is never easy. It can go a lot smiwther 
i^mi you work with' us. We're a nwnber of 
EELO* , iwjrld l«^er in relocation. And any 
miwt your ftmuly must make is a relooUion. 

Jut give tts a caU. We will be happy to explain 
wr comply r^ ^ate/rek)aition s«rvi<^. 



1S47 



UttOMkRowi 



ISfSgS&i^ 804/383-^6 



fil. Q-&® 



The Standard Of Real Estate 
Excellence For The 80*s 

OUR PEOPLE 

MAKE THE 

DIFFERENCE 




OCEANFRONT 

RESORT 
CONDOMINIUM 

24th & Atlantic 

From $76,500 

Sales Office 422-3185 



•>■!, 




Af/^\Tn 



Pyle Realty is moving forwird, watch for us 
in future annottncements 



\ 




Rhodes Realty, Ltd. 



I(i H.MlIt s 



< iu-.tiu.il-i' % \ 2-V^2(i 







Buy now. 

Build later. 

Is this the way 

. to retire 

to Florida? 






For moA people, the imwer^s yes. With infUtion what it is, 
h |»ys to buy that homesite at current prices and terms. In- 
rtead of gambling on tomorrow'icosu. 

To help you understand all of the ins and outs of buying 
land in Florida. C3«»eral Develcgm Mnt. one of Florida's le ading 
community developers, has 
prepared a comprehensive 
Property Information Kit 
idXNit tbar coomranitics as wdJ 
M Horida in general. 

Send fw it It could save you 
enou^ so that you can retirel 
MrUer than you wne pUnningl 
toor«Il: 443.11M 

I General 
Developmert 

3^ Va. Beach Blvd. 

Va.Batth,VA 23452 

Phmtf ■ii«h iM our PmpfBts MiMTBatkMi Kit. We 
^teitand that's BO COM oriMittioB » pun^ase 







iiMiii ir ■ iirriini wMiWiiii^ tT- --■ --^ "" «—■—««* 
^.■t«(|iiwt.liwaOtfriD»»jgEg»«_WY^;2;^-^ 



mmaitt- 
MOSM 



Look — 

ONLY 

$69,000 

VA appraised. Lovely brick 

Colonial rancher situated on 

approximately Vi treed acre with 

2 full baths and more. 

CaU Mrs. Ricardo 482-3234 

WE ARE NO. 1 IN GREAT BRIDGE 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

191 jmiMtTOWH KdAO CHMAMAKE. VA. 

S47-4SSS 

hi TIM NmH Of tTMl Mrit* 



MB 



99VV«V^ 



^w^l 



^«av^aBW9wp 



8 Virginia BqwA Sim. Noyembg 24. 1 




The Womairs y tew 



The Chopping Bloc 



We are featuring a couple of desserts this week for 
your holiday eating enjoyment. 

Among these deaKrts is a favorite redpe of LtaMh J. 
Dobbtas, Home &onomics Teacher at Indian River 
Kgh School in Chesapeake whose redpe l»s been ac- 
cepted fat pubUcatkm in a new cookboiA fiyblished by 
Favorite ^Kipes Press of Nashville, Tennenee. 

"BittCTSwe^ Oiocatete CSteesecake" andean in the 
Desserts cookbocA which iadiuks over 300 redpes for 
low-calorie tre^s, froKn and refrigerated dessols, 
cheese-<»kes, nwringaes uid tortes, in addition to 
tradition^ cookia, cakes and pies. 



BITTERSWEEr CHOCOLATE CHEESECAKE 



1 V* C. graham cracker cmmbs 
21. sugar 

V* C. margarine, melted 
'/i C. chopped peanuts 




2 B-oz. packages cream cheese, softened 
1 can sweetened condensed milk 
1 tsp. almond extract 
1 6-oz. pkg. chocolate chips, melted 



Combine first 4 ingredients in bowl, mixing well. Picas into baking dish. Bake at 350 d^rees for 10 min. 
Beat together next 3 ingred. in bowl. Pov mdted chocolate into pie crust. Swtarl with knife to marbleize. 
Chill in refrigerator. Yield is 8 slices. 



A Little Holiday Magic • Kahlua and Pumpkii^ 



KAHLUA PUMPKIN PIE 



V4 cup light com syrup 
1 Vi tsp. pumpkin {Me si^ce 

Vitsp. sah 



2 lar^ eggs, beaten 
1 Vi cups canned pumpkin 
Kahlua Cream Topping 



1 (9-in.) unbaked pie shdl 

1 cup undiluted evaporated milk 

Vi cup Kahlua 

Line a 9-inch pie plate with your favorite pastry crust redpe. Beat milk, sugar, Kahlua, com syrap, spice 
and salt together until blended. Stir in eggs and pumpkin until mixture is smooth. Bake pastry shell in hot 
oven (450 degrees F) for 7 or 8 min. until it begins to brown lightly. Stir fflling. Pull ovm rack pari way out 
and slowly pour pumpkin mixture into shell. Reset heat control to moderately slow (325 degrees F.) and 
continue baking until filling is bardy set in center - about 40 minutes. Cool pie on wire rack. Serve with 
Kahlua Cream Topping, (makes 1 9-inch pie.) 

Kahlua Cream Topping: Beat 1 cup whipping cream with 1 T. Each of powdered sugar and Kahlua, just 
until stiff . Turn into serving bowl and drizzle 1 T. Kahlua on top. % 



I Better Business Bureau 



Getting More For Your Money 



Newly revised and up- 

i dated. Getting More For 

mYour Money is unlike any 

other consumer 

guidebook. Formerly 

titled "Guide to Wise 

Buying," this official 

I buying guide of the Better 

I Business Bureaus has been 

j rewritten to fit the 

I currrent economic and 

I business scene, with mop- 

I ney-saving advice to serve 

i today's inflation-fighting 

{ consumer. 

Getting More For Your 
Money represents a 
distillation of more than 8 
million requests for 
buying advice and infor- 
mation recdved by the 153 
EBB offices in major dties 
throughout the United 



States. Also included are 
research and recommen- 
dations by the staff of the 
Coimdl of Better Business 
Bureaus in Washington, 
D. C. and a complete 
listing of the addresses 
and phone numbers of 
every Better Business 
Bureau ih |he U<S. and 
abroad. 

The 384-page book is a 
comprehensive guide 
provkling dear and con- 
cise facts, advice and to*- 
minology on more than 
100 cat^ories of |»oducts 
ami services and contains 
literally thousands of tips - 
prova advice - to hdp tlw 
consumer save money and 
grief on every purduse. 
Information is 




knowledge needed to 
make wise and wary 
buying dedsipns. 

Soft-covered, the book 
is alphabeticaUy^juranged 
and indexed for. «aty 
reference. Sin^e (^c|liks 
retail at *7.95 e^L 



alphabeticaUy-arrantid m 
an easy-refoeooe frnmat. 
Mmc than just a book of 
tips or brmpd-by>brand 
comparisons, gettiHg 
More For YourMon^ k a 
generic guide which 
provides Uie average cm- 
sumer with the basic 



hook mvd mjiOteu. 
widi your toad ] 
it diould be <m i 
by nop. 



'*'* 



**J^ 



Chariotte Montgranery 
of Good H<MnckcqriBg 

Magazine, caUed "Guide 
to Wise Buying", "a 
valuable handbook of 
consumer help. 





To The Womvi's Editor: 

I really like your new addition of womui's j 
in the iNyiM'. Can you irfease put a sewu^ cdinnui 
in. You have decorating and recipes and 
household, so why not a sew ud stitch column? 

Many others, like nqrsdf, I am sure, stay at 
home and do oafts and aO. Tlank you and keQ> 
doing what you're doing, my si^o- and I took 
forward to Uw p»pex every wtA. 

Bdte and Elizabeth Swain 
Virginia Beadi 

(Editor's Note: Tltanla, ¥ie are Uniting to start a 
sewing and aafi cohtmi, hopefully mxt week.) 

Woman's View Editor: 

What a wdcome change to our tumwtown 
newspaper, the W<mian's View! Keep up the good 
work. 

Who is the editor anyway? He or She do a 
splendid job. 

Mrs. Arthur F. MufRne, 
Chesapeake, Va. 

(Editor^ Note: Thanlcs vay much - Pat Beasley is 
the Woman's View Editor, and a "She".) 



Dear Editor: 

Having recently renewed my subscrij^fHi to 
Hie Cli^4>eake Post, after a two year absoice 
while my husband served a tour of duty in 
Jacksonville, Florida, it is nice to conw badk to a 
conimunity like Chesapeake where we arie served 
with a hearty l^i»ng of "down-h<Nne',' country 
and community news about our friends and 
ndghbors every week. 

Nice touch too, your Woooan's View pages. 

Mary Ellen Baker 
Chesapeake 



Announcements 




Hdiday shoppers at area Miller A Rhoadf 
stores caiTphdne relatives and Mends throughout 
the country free of charge at a spedal "Phone 
Home fiar the Holidays" booth that began on 
Nov. IS and wiH continue until December 23, 
courtesy (^ MCL 

E<t' Murphy, for Miller ft Rhoads, said the 
pr(^ram is a way for the department store to s^ow 
its gratitude to its customers during the holiday 
ooUrfMWe/ *,?fco»ds store* j^miclpatiM Jn 
ISnUy delebritidn are ih Cli^salieUte 
(Greenbrier), Hampton (New Market N.) and 
Virginia Beach (Lynnhaven). "This is the only 
. depar^nent store in the area offering this free gift 
, to its customers and we expect callers to share the 
^ season*! cheer with friends and relatives all 
^ Kross America," Murphy said. 

Callers cah place a 3-minute long distasM call 
' to any of the more than 7,000 communities served 
by MCI at no charge. No purchase is required to 
' partidpate. 



Keeping In Touch 
At Country Touch 

&cmfai and Midtad &iuth, both natives of tlw 
Ciies^mdce area, grew wp with the country atmmphere 
which led Aem to open iq) thdr country crafts store 
"CouBttyToodi." 

Both oyoy the couitty way of life and wanted to 
carry <» the traditii»is <rf the fine (T^tsmen of the past. 
All oafts at "Country Toudi" are manuf»:tured by 
hmuA by &enda and othCT local Artisans a»l Craf- 
tmca. iUiytme desiring to disf^y/sell thdr aafts can 
do so by contwrdng foenda. 

Brenda and Michad oijoy serving the Ch»apeake 
resident and feel they have devdoped a good following 
and owe thdr success to the support of these fine 
oistomers. 

They will hoM their Chri^nns Open House on Sun- 
day, Nov. 28 from 1-S p.m. and wish to invite everyoM 
to stop in; enjoy the refreshmenu, and see if Brenda and 
hfidiad can h^ tliem with some Christmas gift ideas. 



BreruiaSndth 
MichaeiSmith 





Country Acceaories 
Country CurUUns 
Handmade Items 
Hand Cntfted Furniture 
QuuUmand OULamps 




Country Touch 

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Vir^i^ Beach Svii,lito««iiber 24, 1982 9 




The WoNMn's View 



mmmmtltli 



The 

Uprooted 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 




I. Robert Penoa, Jr. ia mL neoitive chef or Vic Zoddas iMtu- 
mt of BoUtejr In of rortHMMth, Vs. 

Mr. PcnoB appnred oa "TMnralR Evcalag" show Moatejr 
evoalHg (Not. 22), at wUch tiaM be ihowed his caliaaf; ai« aid ice 
fanrtag crtftBUMsUp. 

In the atmospho'e of some of your close friends or 
just for a late night-cap why not fondue it. The place 
can be any setting that you may choose, seeing that the 
fondue is a portable piece of wjuipment. Any <;an- 
pUments can be made ahead of time, and heat«l in time 
for this special occasion. It is recommended, by me, that 
you only plan to fondue wh«i there are six or less people 
involved. This can prove to be a warm and conver- 
sational type atmosphere, iwith everyone cooking their 
very own morsels, with an array of sauces to cmh- 
pliment the same. 

Don't be turned away by the word Fondue, thinking 
that I am talking to the chefs of Europe, because you 
are wrong. I believe in making extravagant dishes and 
thinp appear to be simple, so that everyone can be in- 
spired ^o take their imagination to the limits. 

I hope that you will find the foUowing hints and 
recipes helpful, and I'm confident that once you've 
fondued. you'll want to fondue. ..it again. 
The Fondoe 

In using the fondue, there are some basic things that 
you must keep in mind: 

1. Use only the recommended type fuel to heat the 
fondue. 

2. The oil is ready for cooking when a bread cube 
browns in 1 minute. 

3. CM in pot should be a depth of 1 '/i inches. . . . 



4. Be sure tht your guests do not usf the iiip^for|( U> 
cat with that they use to submerse beef chtuU(» into 
cooking oil; have them use a second fork. 

5. Keep fuel regubUed during <^kins i|a^ otft o( 
reach from children. ■, 

6. Tty to eliminate any splatt^ing, by uiinc tlie m*^ 
hi^dle and some type of wipeable fabric to protect ypitf 
table fr(Hn any spills that do occur. 

The Meet ^> 

Beef tenderloin or loin steak is best fq^^j^fJii^intQ 
1 inch cubes. 2 pounds will accomodate 5 to 6 P^PS^* 
Portion meat and place in the mif^ of j^^lcpcd 
dishes; which have slots for compliments./ V^n^ eadi 
plate and refrigerate. 

Honeradish Saw* 
Mix together the following; 1 cup-sour creiin, 14 q»p 
horseradish (drained), Vi tsp. lemon juice, Vi t^l Wor- 
cestershire sauce, V4 cup scallions (sliced), Vi cup flop- 
ped parsley, salt and pepper, just a pindi. ^^xig(f0|p 
until serving time covered. 

Mac Cheese Sauce 

Bhie cheese, crumbled Vi rap 

Sour cream ••.... . .'. . H <cup 

Worcestershire sauce IHi l^p. 

Salt, V4 tsp. 

Chives V4 isp. 

'^iix together all above ingredients, cover tightly, |nd 
r.xrt^erate. 

Anchovy Sauce 

.Soften Vi cup of margarine. Add 3 ounces of dniiiied 
anchovy fillet and 1 tbsp. chopped panlcy. NfJbt imUl, 
adding dash of pepper. 

At serving time, place two or three of thf paoippjaaea 
tary sauces into the sectioned slots of each dwt. You 
may want to reserve a section for a complinlentary 
potato if you so desire. Each guest, havhig thdr own 
completed plate, is to skew their beef chmUcs in- 
dividually and submerge into hot oil until cooked to 
desired doneness. Remember to have a se^Mui Cork for 
eating with. Everyone can do it... people in Ifrancefmi' 
due-it, lets fall in Wuve. I bid you a goQddi^ fr|}# Tl^f 
Uprooted Gourmet. • v^^^ ,;"•;.•" 



^!^rr^7^ 



"Br 



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Christmas Shopping 

The Most Unlikely Place.;i 

It is inconceivable to me that anyoiw woqld think of 
going to Polynesian Pools on Virgiiiia ||ei^J91y<t W 
Virginia Beach for... Christmas gifts i^miflitiO^ 
but, my know-it-all neighbor did just that last weel;. She 
can sniff out a bargain and find a "re»l-df|l" 1^ tl^ 
pq^tUBBHiMyB^pnecwini^. :.^ ' 

gtra and ornaments and holiday aepQr,^.^, ._ 
of your friends there and you'll see wlwt I iijc(^|.^ 

Owners Jack Slawson and Thonuis $b«I|«|.4eci(M 
they'd try something really differmt In ^e ilcnir. winter 
months (when folks aren't exactty knocldni #wn the 
doors to buy a swimming pool, Polynetiap, V^ jg«ber 
style for that matter). A little Christinas 1^IM$HfU)<^> 
chock fuU of artificial trees by Mister Christmas impor- 
ted gifts, ornaments, nutcrackers, candletCand l^ more 
offers a nice variety... (from some vwy via pec^le you 
ordinarily visit in spring and summer)... Now, you have 
an acuse to stop and shop in winter too (not ^iitt you 
need one). 



WE'REMQVING! 



__ A Fairfield 

'TOPTicnL 

"' Center 

STOP BY AND SEE 
HOW WE'VE GROWN 

5246 FAIRFIELD 
SHOPPING CENTER | 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. " 
495-1974 




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Crafts Galore" 



Seven different rooms of crafts await peoi^c when 
they visit the Acorn Baslcet. Located at 1918 
Kempsville Rd., Anxn Basket is just across the line 
from Chesapeake, in Vu-ginia Beach. 

Eadi room at the Acorn Basket b stocked with crafts 
and art from local craftspeople. You cwi find crafts for 
your chQdren's room, kitehen, bathrocm or any room in 
the house. ',■::■ 

"We thought it was a good idea to put :the crafts 
people lo<* for in the setting they had in mind for the 
craft," said Jenny Pattcrscm, the owner of the Acorn 
Basket. 

The Acorn Basket is not ycHu- everyday craft stwe. 
"AU the arts and crafts here are placed on consignment 
by the crafters," stated Mrs. Pattersoi, "It gives the 
local artisans a chance to display their work and for 
shoppers to view it in one location, instead of having to 
wait for craft shows." 

The Acorn Basket is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Monday thru Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Sunday. 

The Acorn Bastet will have its Christmas Open 
House on Sunday, Nov. 28 fron 1 to 5 p.m. Everyone is 
invited to drop in and see all the beautiftjl crafts on 

display. 

There will be refreshments and door prizes. 

Jenny is eager to help you with your Christmas 
shopping. 




Om of the niMy ianreiy Chrisl«as dispteys that can 
be foud St m Aeon Bmhtt Ckill Store. 




Stop By Next Door 

Christmas Trees, 

Uve and Cut Now On Sale 



Vifgiiria PattersoB owner oi Ihe Acorn Basket and 
Evergreci Nursery gettliig some of her Uve Oiristmas 
trees ready for her Chrtstmas Open House on Nov. 28. 



r^. 




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In The House 

* Woodcrafli • Ptaatercnrts 

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Virgliiia Beach, Va. 

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10 Virginui Bea^&m. November 24, 1^ 



Hie Woman's View 



Notes To My Friends .. 




/ feel left out 
sometime when the sub- 
ject turns to sports. 
Especially individual 
sports. Sports like 
jogging or racquetball or 
tennis. Some of my 
friends participate in 
such sports, and swear 
that they enjoy them. 

I don't believe it I I 
think they're secretly 
trying to stay healthy, 
and just don't care to 
admit it. 

My favorite sport is 
lying in the shade on a 
summer day. After 
several hours of this I am 
worn to a frazzle. After 
all, shade moves, and , 
depending on the size of 
tfue tree providing the 
shade, it's sometimes 
necessary to move 
several times. And when 
it does come time to 
move to shadier 
territory, a decision must 
be made. 

Whether 'tis nobler... 



October 26. 1981 

I don't like Mondays. 
I never have liked Mon^ 
days. And even th<nigh I 
didn't like Mondays 
back before Monday 
Night Football. I Uke 
Mondays even less now 
that there is Monday 
Niftht Football. 

I realize that it's risky 
to make an admi^on 
like that to an audience 
that probably wouldn't 
be up this time of night if 
it didn't like football, 
but I hasten to add that 
it's not football I dislike, 
it's Monday Night Foot- 
ball in particular. 

Football belongs in its 
I^ce. 

Fridays nights for high 
schools. 

Satlirday afternoons 
for college. 

And Sundays and 
holidays for the pro. 

That's the natural or- 
der of things. 

I realize, some very 
bright and highly-paid 
executives at ABC 
thought up the idea, and 
who am I to second guess 
them. 

Well sir, just remem- 
ber that those are the 
same guys who think 
that Howard Cosell 
knows something about 
grammar. 

Isn't it just possible 
that they're also wrong 
about Monday Night 
Football? 
September 16. 1980. 

I think I've Hnally 
figured out the problem 
of understanding bet- 



ween men and women. 

It's simple. Men and 
women may look at the 
same thing, under the 
same conditions, and see 
something altogether 
different. 

Take football for 
example. On a weekend 
afternoon, I see football 
as a gallant contest of 
will, strength, and cun- 
ning — a battle royal with 
no political con- 
siderations to take the 
fim out of it. 

My wife, on the other 
hand, see a silly game 
with a lot of oversized 
simpletons running 
around tripping each 
other. 

On Monday nights I 
tend to agree with her. 

But it goes further... 

At Elam, my wife 
looks at the outside walls 
of our old farmhouse 
and sees cracked and 
peeling paint. I see a 
venerable old structure 
that bears testimony to 
the summers and winters 
it has served as a shelter 
from the forces of 
nature. 

Especially so on a 
weekend afternoon. 



This series of excerpts 
from "Notes To My 
Friends" is brought to you 
through the courtesy of 
The Doaniag CompaBy, a 
local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book is 
available in most book 
stores. 



Getting High With Helium Hi 




Had a spat with a loved 
One? Need to decra-ate 
lot an upcoming holiday 
party? Want to cheer up a 
hospitalized friend? 

If you are faced with 
one of the above, two 
Virginia Beach entre- 
preneurs may have a nov- 
el sdution for ymi: Send a 
bouquet of balloms. 

Angela Williams, own- 
er of Helium Hi's, and her 
associate. Judy Irby. firm- 
ly believe their products 
can compete with such 
traditional tdcens aS es- 
teem as flowers, candy, 
and stuffed animals. 

"Balloons are the kind 
of gift for somebody who 
is looking to be just a little 
bit different," says Wil- 
liams. "If you've got to 
buy a gift anyhow, why 
not buy something a little 
unique?" adds Irby. 

The multi colored ba- 
lo(ms, attached to plant- 
ers, range in price ft(Hn 
$15 to $30. And, fot a 
slight additional charge, 
Williams and Irby will 
deliver anywhere fi"om 
Knott's Island to Willi- 
amsburg. Besides bal- 
lons. Helium Hi's offers a 
vast array of plants im- 
ported from Florida cost- 
ing between $12 and $33. 

"There is no doubt in 
my mind that the services 
we offer are the best in 
the area." says Williams. 



"We have better (quality, 
we are raott dependable, 
and we are cheaper." 

Besides delivering bou- 
quets. Helium Hi's also 
decorates with ballocms 
for special occasims. In 
the four mcmths since they 
opened shop, Williams 
and Irby have adorned 
ofBces, nightclubs, rest- 
aurants and wedding re- 
ceptions with their hel- 
ium filled decorations. At 
the recent groundbreak- 
ing ceremony few the Vir- 
ginia Museum of Marine 
Sciences. Helium Hi's 
donated a large ballocm 
display to the festivities. 

Startiag a basiness 

Williams was in the 
market for a new business 
endeavor early this year, 
when she stumbled upon 
a magazine article about 
the corporate franchise. 
Helium Hi's. (There are 
some 120 outlets around 
the country). "I thought 
that it would be sane- 
thing that could be a lot of 
fim," recalls Williams. 
So, she flew to company 
headquarters in St. Louis 
and purchased franchise 
rights for the Cheater 
HamptCMi Roads area. "I 
had been thinking about 
opening a clothes $iote or 
a toy store, but this just 
seemed like it would be 
the most fiin," she added. 



Soon therafter, Wil- 
liams began renovating 
a former beauty sal(m in 
the Princess Anne Plaza 
sh(^ping center off Vir- 
ginia Beach Bcnilevard. 
Twomcmths later, in July, 
she was ready for busi- 
ness. But, was business 
ready fw her? 

"Well," she admits, 
"it was a little slow at 
first. Every month, tho- 
ugh, our business has 
increased. It is just a 
matter of time, develcq)- 
ing a steady clientele, and 



getting your name out in 
public." 

Another key to success 
is to always go out of your 
way to please custcnners, 
Williams says. To ham- 
mer her point hc»ne, Wilr 
liams says she has deli- 
vered bouquets to such 
exotic locations as the 
Ncn-folk city jail and to a 
Navy ship. "I've even 
had people chase the van 
down in their cars to 
accost me fw a bouquet," 
says Irby. 

How far do they expect 



their business to go in 
times to come? "Initially, 
I didn't look at this as 
somethiAg to make tcnis of 
money with," says Wil- 
liams. ''Eventually, tho- 
ugh, the potential tax this 
is unlimited," adds Irby. 
To get tbere. however, 
Irby says she and her high 
schoeri classibite, Wil- 
liams, will have to fdtow 
due gcMen ruk. "If you 
want to be biggfr than 
everyhfldsrttlW,' you have 
to always jjo that one 
extra step," she says. 




Angela WiUiams Oef t), owner of HeUum Hi and her associate Jady Irby arc eager to 
help with yoar gift balloons. 



"Trifles make perfection, 

and perfection is no 

trifle." 

Michelangelo 



— ANNOUNCEMENTS 

A beauty pageant for young ladies between the 
ages of two and 21 will be held on Sunday 
afterno(»i, Dec. 5 in the auditorium at Handley 
High Schod in Winchester, Va. The pageant, a 
preliminary pageant will be conducted as such, is 
open to all residents of Virginia and the winners in 
each division will attend the State Pageant which 
will be held in August and November of 1983. 

All contestants will appear in either a l(mg or 
short part dress and will be judged cm beauty, 
pcHse and perscmality. There is no talent divisitn 
in the pageant. 

A winner will be selected in each age division 
and will have a Court of four runners-up. Special 
gifts and awards will be presented and all 
contgestants will receive a trc^hy or plaque. 

If you would like more information to apply for 
an entry f«m, write: "Flight toto Fantasy" 
Pageant, 606 Smithfield Ave., Apt. No. 2, 
Winchester, Virginia, 22601. The deadlme for 
entries is December 1. 

The American Business Women's Association 
will present a luncheon/fashion show, Saturday, 
Dec. 4 at Hdiday bin/Sc(H>e at 12 noon. The 
speaker will be Barbara Lewis with models from 
Charm Associates. Entertainment by the Debbie 
Cope land Dancers. 

The price is $10.00 to benefit the schdarship 
fund. 

For tickeU/infonnation. call Diana Britt. 427- 
52 10 (home) or 857-2302 (work). 

"Parents Without Partners. Tidewater Chapter 
#166 will hdd an introductory meeting at 4205 
FlowerfieW <m Tuesday. Nov. 30 at 8 p.m. 

For fiirther infcwmation. please call 855-7661 ot 
487-2480. 



^TheHi 




rt 



LINGERIE BOUTIQUE, ltd 



ChuckFauUowr "The Hint Man^* comes to this 
paper next week in regular weekly instaUments. 
Ihe winner of many awards in radio, television, 
and fihn. he is now appearing every weekday on 
the Continental Broadcasting Network's show 
"Time Out," where he does a five-minute spot 
called "The Hint Man." He hosts a call-in radio 
show en WNIS-AM four hours every week night. 
Chucks ralumn will an)ear weekly commencing 
December 1 in The Woman's View pages of The 
Virginia Betxh &m and Otesapeake Post. 
Welcome aboard Chuck.... we're looking forward 
to those "750 helpful household hints" from your 
bo(A <A the same name. 

Womans View Editor 
PatBeastey 



"Swwt and Sassy" 

Lingerie Boutique, Ltd., a unique inrimate apparel 
shop in the Providence Square shopping center, offers a 
relaxing atmosphere where even the most reserved can 
try cm or even model {ton husbands at boyfriends) 
without the crowd of a large store. 

This specialty ihop carries a large selecticm of 
lingerie frmn sweet to sassy in Vanity Fair. (Mga. 
Barbizon, Vassarette and other famous named brands. 

Owner Sandy Lewis, experienced in women's 
fiuhioos. prondes the personalized attention that she 
and her staff feel are necessary to ensure prefer fit and 
style lox their customers. Sandy also maintains a 
registry for all her customers especially new brides. 
This added servi^ will aid husbands and/or b(^fr1end 
in selecting gifts in the future. Additi(»ally, special 
orders are accepted for items not available. 

Lingerie Boutique, Ltd. will be (rffering a lingerie 
fashion show for the men. Watch for date!! 




Large Selection 

For 
Christmas Gifts 

Just Arrived, 
New Selection of 
Veiour Robes and 

Oiga gowns. 

1027 Kempsville Rd. 
Providence Square Stopping Ctr. 

495-3048 



Himrs to turn. - 6p.m. 

Mon^ thru Saturday 

Thundayopm 'til 8:30 p.m. 




463-2638 



GIFTS 

PLANTS 

BALUX)NS 



"SometM^ Special For Someone S^tedal*' 

Helium Hi *s 

■3333 Princess Anne Plaza - Store 03 
Vifginia Beach, Virginia, 23452 



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ENERGY SAVER 




50% OFF SELECTED FANS 
35% OFF FANS 

499-7601 

414 S. PARUAMENT DR. 
VIRGINIA 0EACH. VA. 234€2 



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J244 FAIKFimJ) SHOPPING CENTER 



495-2006 



CHRISTMAS OPEN 

HOUSE 




TAG 



SAI£ 



Sttiitey Nov. 28th 
12:00 NooH.6:00P.M. 

Door Prizes 
RefreshmeDti 



Colot^d House Florist 

Comet of Military Hgwy. and Engie Ave. 
Q»^p»ke. Va. 



420-8000 

N«tto^*sAv^M2 



Virginia B«u:b Sun, Novemba 24, 1SW2 1 1 




Holiday Season Dinner Slated 



The Virginia Betfch 
Chapter of the f^ill GcMpel 
Businest-mea's Fellow- 
ihip International wHt 
hold a special holiday 



season dinner meeting, 
featuring internationally 
popular tenor, Steve Rose- 
berry on Thursday, Dec. , 
7:30 p.m. at Fort Story 



Offlwrs Club, Virginia 
Beach. 

For information and 
reservations (all 463^2549 
or 422-1479. 



Albero Named To 'Who's Who' 



Cadet Dominic M. 
Albero, of Viqinia Beadi. 
is one of 29 aoiims at the 
Virgiiiia Military Institute 
who have beoi named to 
"Who's Who Among 
Students in American 
Universities and 



CoUeges." 

The cadets were selected 
by a faculty-student com- 
mittee on the basis of thdr 
academic and extrKur- 
ricular records and general 
contributions to VMI. 

Cadet Albero, a civil 
engineering major, is a 



dean's list and 
aaukmkaOy distinguished. 
He is enrolled in the Navy 
ROTC i»-ogram at the In- 
stitute. Son of Capt. and 
Mrs. Carl M. Albero of 
1300 Cronwall Lane, he is 
a 1979 gruluate of Frank 
W. Cox High School. 



VBEA 

Gives 

$100 

For 

Art 



The Vir^ite Beach Edncatfon AsiocfaittoB reccally 
-pitched tai for NatiOMd Edaoilfon Wc^, by spoiMoriBg 
a poalcr coated proaotii^ cd«calioB. SapcrvUag the 
^U^taqr last week at LyMhftvw MM were Jan Mafcda 
of Ncwtowa Road EleriiNiiaiy , aad Gary BlaaienstdB 
and LMMalcc Grtaini of llemp's Laatfag Etenwitary. 

Soot 290 Beach Jmlorn^ senior hl0 scbo<ri stndcn- 
IB partldpated fai the coatcst, accordlag to VBEA 
Eaneatfvt Dlicctor James B. Chapnum. Stqihea DaaM, 
a itBdMt at the VocaHoiMl Tralalag Edaoillon Center 
aad Giaea Rna High School, waa awarded first place 
hmioia. He received $1M from tte VBEA,* and his 
■choola* art d^partmeati w«« givoi $110 M well. 

VisiUm were ^vea pampliteti aad fUera caliiag for 

more conunnaitf iavohremeat la pabUc edacatioa. The 

dtotrihattoB of Bteratare was a part of the VBEA's 

."ftojeet CARE," an on<going campaign hlghUghttng 

dM efforts of the city's teachers. 



Beach Program Is Heralded 



The Virginia Beach , 
Sierra II Wilderness 
program has been 
recognized for its juvenile i 
delinquency prevention 
and traUment prc^am t^*> 
the Viri^nia DejMrtmait 
of Crirafaial Justice. 

Project coordinators 
for the program an Bruce 
ibight and Robert Ca^- 
han, court services unit,, 
juvenile and domestic 
reUitions court, Viiiinia 
Beach. 

Project Description: 
The Sierra II Wild«ness 
Program Is a form of 
structured juvenile 
probation whi^ utilitts 
wildaiwss stress activities 
as a catid^t for behavior 
change. The project is a 
fully integrated com- 
ponoit of the court service 
unit structure and is 
utilized by the court as an 
alternative to incarcer- 



ation. The project utilizes 
multiple service com- 
ponents which include in- 
tense probation super- 
vision, individual and 
group counseling, family 
involvement and counsel- 
ing, and educational and 
vocational services and 
referral. The project ser- 
v« concurrent groups of 
ten youth for a period of 
approximately six months, 
with follow-up for ap- 
proximately twelve ad- 
ditional months. 

Impact: Funding has 
assisted the project in 



becoming a formalized in- 
t^ated component of the 
juvenile court services 
unit. During the past 2 
years of project operation, 
over 50 male juveniles 
were served by the 
program. Many of these 
juvrailes were placed in 
the program instead of 
being sent to jail. Thus, in 
1981, the Sierra II 
program was used as an 
alternative to incar- 
ceration for 28 youths, 
who would have served 
over 300 days in jail had 
they not been placed in the 
pr< 




Townsend Appointed 



William Townsend, 
O.D., an optometrist in 
Virginia Beach has been 
appointed a member of 
the American Optanetric 



AsWiation's newly form- 
ed f(ractice Enhancement 
Taslrf orce by the organi- 
zation\ president, Wen- 
dell WJiWie, O.D., of 
Wichita, Kansas. 



Sunny Smile 



Mrs. Reba Nixon of the Princess Anne 
Women's Club was aU smiles last week after 
selling subscriptions for The Virginia Beach 
Sun. For selling 17 of them, Mrs. Nixon ear- 
ned $51 for her club. Yov can earn easy 
money, too. CaU us at 547-4571 for details. 



'Slowly but surely humanity realizes the dreams of the 



wise. 



Anatole France 



The Old GcaenA Store 

CaUeoFabrIa, HmOtnifts. 

HoHdknfftSuivllmmaOifls 

SriMi Aaa«M a BinaWilai 

iaa.B. 10 -■ ».m. aoHiTwi. 

■BtlMtaM aKd M it. IriiM 14 

St. KrMM 



Eaglaeeriag Midia, lae. 

1700 E.Uterty Stmt 

ChcMpnke, VA. 23324 

C/ufIa 4 Dorothy Hockwonh 



Sunday 
11:1-7 

• Htm/tewB 
ll.B-19 



OvCTtoa'tMMwt 

1419PaiadaterStnet 



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Jilt OvertoHltml^mplojmu, 



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FREE ESTIMATES 

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limftAAmm 
SouA Norfolk 



Tuesday 

• Hebreivs 
11:20-29 

Wednesday 

• Hebrews 
11:30-40 

Thursday 

• II Chronicles 
32:1-6 

Friday 

• II Chronicles 
34:29-33 

Saturday || 

• Nehemiah 
2:11-20 



4740Vli|tidaB«wiiM«<i 

497-4854 



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It Takes A Special Person 



:h j 

rl. i 

'!£ i 

is I 



r and The Key 

The hopes and vWons erf maritbid ... the \dS^ to which we a^re. 

C«i we hM ttmn? to tti«e a DOOR to our ^ritual burner? 

A^en s^ ttw Omwc^ Is the Deori Jesus sakJ Ha Wis! 

Mo «}ntra(icten . . . QwM fowided the Chur|:h1 

^ usel e ss to ttw door ««h«Jt a key. 

\^% not 0ftw die tsm^teg^w wid heed foryKirpfaKetrfwor^t^pttito 
wedc? 

TYm decWon to seek ttie Doop-ttM to the KEY. 



Pictured above 
with one of her kiosk 
managers, Myra Lex, 
at the grand opening 
of Tidewater Enter- 
prise's newest Quick 
Mart on the corner of 
Holland Road and 
Rosemont Road in 
Virginia Beach, is 
Mickey Allard, a 
''▼ery special per- 
son," in the words of 
Troy Swindell and 
Charlie Blanchard, 
owners of a rapidly 
growing chain of 
Qnick Mart Texacare 
operations in Tide- 
water. 

**It is through 
Rfickey's untiring and 
dedicated service that 



our last three grand 
openings have been a 
tremendous success. 
It takes a special per- 
son to work under the 
pressure she has had 
to work under, meet 
the deadlines she's 
had to meet, and 
realize the success we 
have had at each 
location," said Sherry 
Swindell of Tidewater 
Enterprises head- 
quarters. 

'*Thte super special 
lady has gone that ex- 
tra mile and given all 
employees at each 
new store a party Just 
before the grand 
opening of each, and 



the long arduous "' 
hours she has worked ^s 
attMt to her devotion ^'^ 
to this firm and the*'^ 
pride she takes in her^^ 
work," stated Troy^^ 
Swindell, one of Tlde-y 
water Enterprise'sj^ 
con>orate officers. r' 

"Mickey is fortun- s\ 
ate in having a moat 
understanding hus- ^ 
band, too," commen- 
ted Charlie Blan-^^ 
chard. President i^ 
of the corporation. 
"Al is right by her^^ 
side at every opening 
every day working 
side by side with 
Mickey nntU the Job is 
done." 



Or. 



SeripiMfw w l icwd liy t>o /Mn^rtctw WUm Sadly 



C(«yrigM ISK MMIar AdywMng Sarvio* 
P. Bo«t(S4. C»«WlMlMvN«, VtrgMi 2SSW 






Pflesi,feK. 

4$MPsn*reteMd 




7*1% Swet 



nsttwnm 



TaM 

3SII 



Ca. 



m. 



PmU's Place ttripeaMifi 

M»4WoA«i 
• lllipi pto Wed. a Ttai. f9im 

^|.19t7oraMt49 

Jttxb west <rf iMtaa Uw 




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12 Virginia Beach Sun, November 24. 1982 



Community Hews 




Library Volunteers Honored 



For Work A t Bay side 



Some 47 dedicated Virginia Beacii residents were 
saluted recently at the second annual Thanksgiving Tea 
for Bayside Library volunteers. 

The event, attended by Virginia Beach Library Direc- 
tor Marcy Sims, saluted the efforts on the branch's 12 
desk volunteers, plus 35 workers from the special ser- 
vices and reference divisions. The volunteers donate 
their spare time to assist the library's staff in day-to-day 
operation of the facility. The occasion, which took 
place in one of the library's offices, featured various 
baked goods along with tea and coffee. 



Top Picture: left to right. 
Colleen Rodeffer and 
Audrey Purser (volunteers) 
chat with Virginia Beach 
Library Director Marcy 
Sims. To left: volunteers 
Kathy Barnes, Karin Poole 
and Mary Esterlund. Bot- 
tom left: Bob Sharpley and 
Liz Babashanian. Bottom 
right, Wade Gale. 




I Sheltie Club Hosts Veterinarian At Kempsville Library 



The Sheltie Club of 
Tidewater will host Dr. 
Constance Pozniak for 
her presentation of 
veterinary Emergencies: 
Effective Ways To Help 
Your Pet, on Tuesday, 
Nov. 23, at 7 p.m. to be 
held at the Kempsville 
Branch of the Virginia 
Beach Library. 

Dr. Pozniak, a graduate 
;of the University of 
■Georgia College of 
iVeterinary Medicine, had 
■been Director of the 
iEmcrgency Veterinary 
•Clinic in Newport News 

Legal 

Women 

Meet 

\ The Virginia Beach 
{Legal Secretaries 
L^sociation will conduct 
tits regular monthly 
kneeting on Monday, Nov. 
|29, 1982, at 7:30 p.m. in 
{the home of Ms. Johnson 
flocated at 2212 East Ad- 
•miral Drive, Virginia 
{Beach. 

^ JDeposal 
I Wives 
\ Meet 

The Expk)ii\« Otdm- 
ance Deposal Wives Oub 
will hold its aaonthly me- 

; eting at 2000 Agnes Coart 

• at 7:30 p.m., or Tkoitilay, 

i Nov.28. 

I "Energy Tm" wiU be 

(the ti^ for the meeting. 
Tlis prt^ram is o^a to 
^ tfee ^blk. 
I 

I 



for several years before 
coming to Virginia Beach 
in August of this year. She 



is presently heading Prin- 
cess Anne Veterinary 
Clinic at Great Neck in 



association with Dr. 
James G. Kollar. 
The Sheltie Club was 



foimded nine years ago to 
pKMMte betterment of the 
Shetland Sheepdog breed 



and to educate the public 
and its members about 
Shelties and dogs in 



general. The club is active 
in community services in- 
volving pets, such as tatoo 



clinics and welcomes new 
members. The meeting is 
open to the public. 




Virginia Beach's 

Hometown 

Newspaper 

For Over 56 Years 



Mail your check or money order to: 

THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 

138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

VIrgliila Beacii, Va., 23452 



I 



jNAME. 



"T 



Your Community Service 
Paper is.... 

About you 
About your neighbors 

About Virginia Beach 



ADDRESS. 
riT Y 

STATE 

7X P 



PHONE. 



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f 

To subscrite to Tli« Vlr^nia i««€li fun 

just fill out the form on the right. . . 
We'll do thli^t... 



WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

DOm you- $9.00 
DTwo years $13.00 

ALL OTHER AREA 

DOm year $11.00 
DTwoy««$n.OO 



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PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is { 

a new subscription. D [ 

PLEASE CHECK HERE if you | 

we now r^^dving THE Vll^MIIA j 

•EACH tUN and are rei^mni I 

your sub^rqrtion. D % 

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f ViTgiiiiaBe«diSun.Nov«nber24. 1982 13 







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Chesapeake, VA 23324 

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Oil 

Comniissioii 

33 UmqueShops 
Choose Rrom 

OPEN 

Unir-Fd 
6pat9pm 

Auction Saturday 7:30 pm 

4576 l^^Ohbfoke 

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Sun 



Game 9) New Orteans at San f^andsco 



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Game 13) Ondniiati at Miami (Fla.) 



TIDEWATER 
FIBRE CORP. 

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Caies^»»ke, Virguiia 



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Game 6) Green Bay at N.Y. Jets 



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Rebuilt Carburetors 

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Game 8) Kansas City at L.A. Rams 



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Game 10) Philadelphia at Washingtmi 




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Game 1 S) Rice at Houston 



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14 Virgiiua Beach Sun, November 24, 1982 



V 



rBob Harmon Forecast 



Thursday, Sunday, and Monday, November 25, 28, and 29 

DALLAS 26 CLEVELAND 21 

Cowboys shocked by Steelers in season opener (100 years ago!) 36-28 .. Browns nipped by Eagles 24-21 in 
second game .. teams have met just three times in past thirteen years. 

DETROIT 23 NEW YORK GIANTS 20 

Turkey Day trivia: John Brunner, Lion offensive coordinator, father of Scott Brunner, Giants QB .. 
Lions, Packers led NFC Central prior to strike with 2-0 records. 

ATLANTA.... 20 ST. LOUIS 17 

Falcons, after winning season opener vs Giants, victims of 38-14 burial by Raiders in game #2 ,. Cards won 
opener vs Saints, bombed by Dallas .. Atlanta beat St. L in '81, 41-20. 



BUFFALO 21 



BALTIMORE 10 



Bills scored 58 points vs Colts' twenty in winning both meetings last fall in AFC East competition .. 
Baltimore's 2-14 finish in '81 worst since 2-12 cellar finish in 1974. 

CINCINNATI 28 LOS ANGELES RAIDERS.. 27 

In two big pre-strike wins. Raiders seemed awesome, similar to Super Bowl XV champs .. Bengals bounced 
surprisingly by Steelers, but Cincy at home in great early season match. 

HOUSTON 17 NEWENGLAND 13 

Two pre-strike one and one'ers clash in Foxboro .. Patriots won big in only meeting last fall 38-10, but this 
one almost coin-tosser. . . neither team impressive in early season. 

KANSAS CITY 26 LOS ANGELES RAMS... 17 

Chiefs broke six-game, three year losing strelik vs Chargers 19-12 back in September .. Rams fell on faces 
twice in openers vs Pack, Lions .. will have hands full with Chiefs. 



MINNESOTA ....23 , CHICAGO 14 

Renewal of NFC Central rivalry that in spite of Viking success in recent years has been stumbler .. last 
season Bears won 10-9, then edged 24-21 . , it's in Viking country, tho, 

NEW YORK JETS 24 GREEN BAY 23 

Packers raised eyebrows in first two games vs Rams, Giants, with winning comebacks in both .. Jets 
obliterated by Dolphins in opener .. will be only wee favorites over Pack. 

PITTSBURGH 30 SEATTLE 13 

Steelers, tired of playing dead past two years, provided bigfest shockers in pre-strike "era," beating both 
Cowboys, Bengals . . Seahawks succumbed twice to Browns ind Oilers. 



SAN DIEGO 24 DENVER 17 

Believe it or not, here are two teams already meeting for second time in abbreviated season .. Chargers 
wiped out Broncos in Denver in opener 23-3 . . Broncos edged 49ers 24-21 . 

SAN FRANCISCO 21 NEW ORLEANS.. 16 

No panic yet, but Super Bowl XVI champion 49ers need to get back in winners' circle .. Saints came up 
with big shut-out of Bears just before strike, so N.O. could be tough. 

WASHINGTON 27 PHILADELPHIA 26 

Couple of other repeaters from opening day .. Redskins nipped Eaglis 37-34 on way to strong '82 start, 
also beating Bucs .. Washington could be strong challenger in NFC East. 

MIAMI..., 27 TAMPA BAY 20 

Renewal of Battle of Florida after just one regular season game played in 1976 .. Dolphins won 23-20 .. 
both division champions in 1981 .. Miami 2-0 before strike, Bucs were 0-2. 



' 


COLLEGE GAMES 




Thurs., Nov. 


25 


Thanksgiving Day 




Alabama State 


26 


Tuskegee 


20 


Morris Brown 


21 


Clark 


6 


North CaroUna 


33 


Bowling Green 


7 


Presbyterian 


26 


Newberry 


24 


Texas 


23 


Texas A & M 


10 


Friday 


, November 26 




Delaware 


35 


Connecticul 


13 


Nebraska 


31 


Oklahoma 


17 


Penn State 


24 


Pittsburgh 


10 


Saturday, 




November 


27 


Air Force 


23 


Hawaii 


21 


Arizona 


24 


Arizona State 


23 


Auburn 


22 


Alabama 


21 


Clemson 


40 


Wake Forest 


7 


Florida A & M 


27 


Bethune-Cookmad 


13 


FuUerton 


24 


Nerada-La« Vegar 


■^2 


Georgia 


34 


Georgia Tech 


10 


Grambling 


27 


Southern U. 


23 


Houston 


31 


Rice 


12 


L.S.U. 


31 


Tulane 


10 


Memphis State 


22 


Arkansas State 


. 20 


Miami, Fla. 


28 


Cincinnati 


13 


Oklahoma State 


21 


San Diego State 


14 


Oregon 


23 


Oregon State 


17 


South'n Calif. 


24 


Notre Dame 


17 


Utah State 


24 


Long Beach State 


20 


Vanderbilt 


27 


Tennessee 


20 


V.P.L 


21 


Virginia 


10 


Saturday, December 4 




Arkansas 


20 


Texas 


14 


Florida State 


28 


Florida 


14 


Navy 


26 


Army 


10 


Nebraska 


42 


Hawaii 


7 



HIGHLIGHTS 

At opposite ends of the country, two of the nation's 
powerhouses, Georgia and Arizona State, will close out 
a couple of extremely successful seasons. The Bulldogs 
froni Athens host Georgia Tech in the finale of their 10 
and season. The Yellow Jackets are 6 and 4, so 
Georgia is in the role of very heavy favorite to nail down 
not only an undefeated season, but probably a national 
chapionship. Last season, the Bulldogs destroyed 
Georgia Techds 44-7. This Saturday could be a repeat. 

Arizona State has a much toughor assignment tin 
trying to finish its season with only one loss as it travels 
to Tucson to battle intra-state rival Arizona. The Sun 
Devils tangle with a group of Arizona Wildcats that has 
given everyone cat fits .. and that includes a big 16-13 
win over Notre Dame. Though neither team ever has 
difficulty getting up for this contest, we think Arizona 
State might have more of a problem after its recent 
disheartening loss to Washington. We think the pesky 
Wildcats will just nip the Sun Devils. 

In 1981 Penn State methodically took Pittsburgh 
apart 48-14. EarUer this season, Alabama did the same 
to Penn State 42-21. And Pitt received the same treat- 
ment from Notre Dame 31-16. Toss out those loss« 
and this match-up might ym^ have been for the national 
championship. Penn Sute has rolled up 349 points in 
its 9 and 1 season while tte Panther's total through nine 
games was 235. Howevo-, all i»st history will be forgot- 
ten when these two meet in University Park this Friday 
where tl» Nittany Uons ate the hosts - and the 
favorites. 

Taking a quick look at the forecasting average 
through die first tea weel» of tiM ta»on. the Harmon 
s^on B still fdrly healthy. Through Saturday, 
Novonbo' 6lh, we forecast the resvdtt of 1,723 games, 
32 of them ^«ting in tia. Of the remaining 1 ,691 , there 
«nv 1,264 winners and 427 iMers for a .747 average. 

'Nuff MHOfHlt^kNlS. 

Hm otlMr 1^ conteM oa ttkkft Oklahmna at 
Nebrasluu The Conkmken wve waytaid by Penn 
Sute arty tai the season, and the Sooners hwl idea^^ 
protteM te^ with West VIripnia, tha with Soutimn 
CaUfcMi^. Ttm one,, a^un wtU be for aD te frcMting 
oattel^l^^OMif<»wcecake. Nebraska wm a hu^ 
37-14 wJiMr Im U^ md k>okt to do a ^Oe of the 

!tkiS3^U', 



VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 













n 



ft«* 



Guess thfe Winning Teams! 



A 



\ 



^ 



Last Weeks Winners 

1st Place 

Joan Exum 
716 Cardinal Roao 
Virginia Beach . 



2nd Place 

Frederick B. Weiss 
114 86th St. 
Virginia Beach 



To enter, just check each sponsor on the preceding 
page and find the game. A different game for each 
sponsor plus a tie-breaker. Write down the name of the 
team you think will win that game ,a the appropriate 
space and the business advertiser's name in wt)ich that 
game is located. Failure to write both in the correct 
space wiJJ be declared » wrong gue%% Fnter as often as 
you wish but only on the official entry form below. En- 
tries will be judged by the staff of the Chesapeake Post 
and their decision will be final. Entries ntust be post- 
marked no later than 12 noon on Saturday. 



WEEKLY PRIZES ! 



GIFT 

CERTMCATE 
1ST PRIZE 



$ 



GIFT 
ICERTMCATE 
2ND PRIZE 

FOR MOST CORRECT GUESSES 



FOR ANY 
PERFECT GAME 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 



WEEK ENDINGDEC. 



j YOUR NAME 

I 
I 



ADDRESS. 



fCmf. 



JHONE_ 



GAME WINNER 



BUSINESS ADVOCnSER 



I (Gamcl) 

I- 



j (Game 2) 



r (Game 3) 



I (Game 4) 



I- 



(GameS) 



I 



<GaaM6) 



I <Ganc7) 



<GaMf) 



(Qnw9) 



I- = 

I mmm of gn 



tiAMEWINNElt 



BUgmESS ADVOmSER 



(GaMll) 



I (Gane 12) 



(Game 13) 



(Gaacl^ 



(GaiMlS) 



(GamlQ 



-i 



CGaaMi?) 



1 



(GaiMlS) 



AGmmm 



[GmmM) 



im wmuugsi Pkfc the 

*¥ AmcMm vs. Haiwii»*" 



TOTAL 



MAILfNIVYlO: 



P.O. »» 132? 
aies^xate.VA. 23^ 



wwww^v 



^aemim 



VirgiiiiaBettiiSim.Novaiiter24, 1^ IS 



r.n-' 






• •^^Kf^f^f^. 



^WmiW^- 



Guide To Virginia Beach 

eoiDiDE-eTiRtBer 

ARTef & eRAFTcT 
ANTIQUEcr 



Yesterdays' Treasures 

Todays' Handicrafts 

Tomorroars! Heirlooms 





Couiltryside Oiristinas 

Countryside Shops is sponsoring a Countryside 
Christmas Market at the Pavilion on November 27 
and 28 featuring many of the finest crafUpeople 
and artists in the area. 

Local merchants will also be represented in a 
special holidax, section. 

Support your local artists and craftspeople for 
Christmas giving! 




-rCQUNTRY HERITAGE] 

—^973 Profvideiice.Square^ 
C^ter, 



Evaythbig to wvm i4P Of at- 
moahit* cf your home fiom 
Handcntfted Country Fur- 
Hiturt wUH HaHd Carved 
PtmOi 4 DtOvtt and Hand 
Rubbed OU FlnUm (made In 
the North Oeorw^ MounUdm). 
We also have Hand Pebtied 
Hutches. Tnmla, Decoye. Folk 
Art. Mirrors, Stmwes. Tba. 
Handmade Baskets. Weather- 
vanes. Wooden Toys. Country 
KUdienwere. Oak Tables md 
aubs. 
495-Om 



•V' 




B 



^6. 



THE WELCOME 
LATCH 

3478 Holland Lakes 
Shopping Cwiter^ 




"WehmeewytUngto'coun- 
trify' your home. " Such as 
Custom-Mode Curtains. Pine 
Furniture, Kerosene Lamps, 
Calico A Lace. Baskets. Rib- 
bons. Hand Dipped Candks. 
Floral Arrangements. 
Bathroom Fixtures. Frames, 
Country Kitchen, Original Ar- 
twork by Jackie, 15 Rooms 
FUU of Merchandise. 
468-68M 



■?S?fil 



TOLL, T^OAl 




/v" 




•;>] 



■w. 



IM* 




WOODSTOCK HOUffi 

tiOOlProvideiioeRoMi 



"Woodstock House For 
Yow Counby Home. " Oooae 
from a vast telectlM of 
CMeoa, Cu^rm made cur- 
Udns. OmiUy pbie fimUtwe 
A accessories for e¥vy room. ' 
<M and Electric Lamps. 
PrtnMveprii^aull^McAra. 

420-32a 



h^ 



raATnc,iNC| 

- 3470 HoUand Lakes 
S hinin g C entg^ 

^m carry everytl^ for the^ 
"Back To Country" pawn. 
You am now enfoy shef^big 
for your Country-Style Home 
here because we carry the Han- 
dcn^fted Fiimiture you desin. 
Also we have Handmade 
Calico Wreaths. Antique FUr- 
niture. Croas Sitehbig. Initial 
PUIows. Custom Made PiUows. 
Wooden Toys. Custom 
Hurricane Ltmips A Holders. 
Ri^fBng by the yeed. ALSO 
All Furniture made from Pine 
AMaikToOrder. 

JOOflfiL- 



ri^UNTAIN CRAFTS ' 

479 S. Lynnhaven Road — ; 



.0 



We have a Great Sekction of 
Unique Handmade Crttfts and 
Decorative Accessories to help 
create that happy. Homey 
Look such as Homespun 
Tabledoths A Napkins. Quilts 
from Lancaster. PA. Hand 
Dipped Candles. Handmade 
Dolls. Handmade Baskets. 
Wooden Toys. Stoneware, 
Cross Stitch Supplies, and 
other Fine CollectiUes. 
4(3^79 




WAtl^- 



r?te>viDe«££. 



o^ 





© 



'© 



at 





!i^ Indian 5^ Courts 



^RDAN'S COUNTRV- 
8HOP .-5 

Omaer of Saten^ Z 
ijBKl Reaeatkm Drive 



We have M* "AWMmmv ef 
Tamm»row" and euek a, 
Frimidfy Amov^»e, We 
omryOrnXm^BsimUAA^ 
HoM BMrn mi kmre our evm 
FkHelDmiimr. Atmmearry 
Hmii mpp^ Camm^, 
Wmmuburg Anm^mnm^.' 
GN^hT ArtwoHc Iv a^m. 
spaiMbtbiMmkBa mNew 

man MockwaH Figitrlnae.^ 



J- s? f 1 



^ 




FCOUNTRYSHJE SHOPS 

1^5 Landstown Road 



^^fi^ 



.;y^.*- 




^6 



A 



Once there you vriU find a 
wd<pie collection of Folk Art. 
Granite Ware. Primitive Pi- 
lings. Sponge Ware, Old 
Fashioned Teddy Bears. 
Bas»^ Shoe Ards. Smker 
MipredueHmis. T^ Qir^ns, 
Upholstered Furniture and 
Hard-To-Fbid Cotmtry imm. 

4S1-m5 




=THE LADY HIHILER ' 

FARMERS MARKET 
IN VA. BEACH 



1. T^W^^i»Lat<A 
a. Ck^^u'i Attfe, fix:. 



3. douatr^cb Shof^ 

4. Xorctaii'sC(Nitti7 Stops 



The "SIpto Lady" can he^ 
you wUh those special muOm 
bsyoi^ eooOm vM a vride 
variety ttf 9teas. herbs, teas. 
Jams and mere. ma lsohtn >e 

Mm etMMK mm A lae^. 
nanshm^^paa eanates. nooons. 
custom bows, flower 
miangements fmad^Kimi. par- 
lies) and hmuth swmu by 

,Margy._ 

4S7'9454 " 



5. Couirtry Heritage 

6. QyosOma^ 



■RoaD 



Offering a very specud collec- 
tion of Loc^ Arts and Crafts 
as well as QiUecMks md An- 
tiques in a Warm Country 
Home Atmosphere. Eight 
shops featuring Country Fur- 
mture-Handmade, crafts. Fine 
Arts, Pot^y. Carved WUdHfe. 
CMcos end QiMing Su^Oes. 
Oiikben's Treaatres, Ikrbs. 
Spices, Tea. Antique and 
OoOecmies. ^encU Cnffts and 
FeKtArt. 
427-9M9 




7. Woodcock H(Mae 

8. Mountain Cimfts 

9. The LadyPc<kttar 



.>,il'.PMiPU..J'B I Tl 



■PHi^illinOT^^MiWBV"* 



16 Virginia Beadi Sun, Novend)er 24. 1982 



Virginia Be^h Public Notices 



PHMcNtMlllg 



riracnwnmK 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, December 1, 
1982, at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m. in the 
City Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA 

1. James C. Ewing requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 43, Block 1, Section 
Number 1, Baylake Pines, 4216 Ben Gunn Road. 
Bay side Borough. 

2. Claude R. Reynolds, Jr. requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 64, Block D, 
Section 4, Charlestown Lakes, 2009 Sun Valley Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. 

3. Martin J. Duffy requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 2, Block M-M, Section 3, 
Northridge, 52 IS Condor Street. Bayside Borough. 

4. McDonald's Corporation requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a "0" setback from the east property line (boar- 
dwalk) instead of 5 feet as required (patio room) on Lot 
1, 2. and southern half of 3, Block 69, Plat Number 3, 
Virginia Beach Development Company, 2803 Atlantic 
Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

5. Norman E. Pavey requests a variance of 5 feet to a 3 
foot side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feet as 
required and of 7 feet to a 3 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (accessory building - garage) 
on Lot 24, Block 10, Section 1, Chesapeake Shores, 4517 
Lee Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

6. Frederick T. Stant, Jr. and Stephen Swain requests a 
variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 30 feet as required (residential addition) on 
Lots 2 & 5, Parcel A-1 , Subdivision of Parcel A of F. S. 
Royster Jr., Parcel of Plat A, Linkhorn Bay Cor- 
poration, Cavalier Park, Section 1, 1105 Cedar Point 
Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Gospel Assembly Church requests a variance of 22.2 
feet to a 7.8 foot setback from Bradford Road instead 
of 30 feet as required (canopy) on Lot 72, Bradford 
Acres, 1540 Bradford Road. Bayside Borough. 

8. Ronald Keith Brown requests a variance of 10 feet to 
a 20 foot front yard setback and of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from the 15 foot alley adjoining the west 
property line instead of 30 feet each as required and of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 
10 feet as required and of 10 feet in building height to 45 
feet in height instead of a 35 foot building height as 
allowed (through lot) on Lot B, Block 22, Croatan 
Beach, 641 South Atlantic Avenue. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

9. Robert L. James requests a variance of 9.5 feet to a .5 
foot side yard setback (north side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (deck) on Lot 4, Section 1, Haven Estates, 1013 
Dool Court. Kempsville Borough. 

10. Jayne M. and William C. Lawless requests a varian- 
ce of 4 feet to a 16 foot rear yard setback instead of 20 
feet as required (deck) on Lot 7, Block A, Kempsville 
Lakes, 4813 Aspon Court. Kempsville Borough. 

1 1 . John W. Kellam requests a variance of 13 feet to a 5 
foot side yard adjacent to a street (Fentress Avenue) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and of 4 feet to a 4 foot side 
yard setback (east side) instead of 8 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building - storage shed) on Lot 21, Block 8, 
Chesapeake Shores, 4601 Lookout Road. Bayside 
Borough. 

12. John M. and Elizabeth E. Steiner requests a varian- 
ce of 12 feet to an 18 foot front yard setback instead of 
30 feet as required (residential addition) on Lot 1 and 
Western 15 feet of Lot 3, Block K, Hilltop Manor, 756 
Hilltop Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

13. S & S Enterprises by Jack Slawson requests a varian- 
ce of 27 feet to a 3 foot setback from the 15 foot alley 
adjoining the east property line instead of a 30 foot set- 
back as required (deck and swimming pool) on Lot 8, 
Block 13, Croatan Beach, 8(M Surfside Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

14. S & S Enterprises by Jack Slawson requests a varian- 
ce of 27 feet to a 3 foot setback from the 15 foot alley 
adjoining the east property line instead of a 30 foot set- 
back as required and of 7 feet in building height to 42 
feet in height instead of a 35 foot building height as 
allowed (new house, deck, and swimming pool) on Lot 
9, Block 13, Croatan Beach. 804 Surfside Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

15. Karpet Kingdom requests a variance of 10 parking 
spaces to 7 parking spaces instead of 17 parking si»ices 
as required (commercial addition-retail esublishment) 
on Lot "J", Recorded Plan of Davis Property, 2964 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lynnhaven Borough. 

16. William O'Prandy requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
5 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (residential addition - attached garage) on Lot 
189, Section 3, Wolfsnare Plantation, 833 Simpkins 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Webster Building Corporation requests a variance 
of 10 feet to a"0" setlwck from both Great Neck Road 
and Ocean Shore Avenue instead of 10 fe^ each as 
required (decks, stora^ sheds, and fir^laces) on Lots 
4, 5, and 6. Uock G, Lynnhaven Shores, Ocean Smic 
Avenue. Lynnhavoi Boroa^. 

18. Lee A. Gifford T/A Haygood Executive Park 
requests a variance of 1 free-standing ^n to 2 free- 
standing signs instead of 1 free-standing sign as allowed 
(park directory), Haygood Executive Park, Haygood 
Road. Ba^ide Borough. 

1 9. Ronald E. Ruffiatto requests a variam* of 5 feet to a 
5 foot side and rear yard setback (smithwnt corno') in- 
stead of 10 fe^ eadi as required (swimming pod) on 
Lot 19. Blodc C, SectiMi 2, Kenstock, 2413 Jenaa Road. 
LynnlMvra Botov^. 

20. PAPCO OaCfX^mynq^aUa ^riance of 25 feet 
to a 10 fo<M setlMck firam Rrteeen Auk Itoad tarta^ 
of 35 fwt as r»|i^«d ^«p «tanl owcw) m Ptfcd 
A-2, .55 Mres, Lark^w Squue, 4*^0 Prince Amw 
Road. Koni^viUe Bc^i^., 

21. James A. adkteyE. Kiaadr«|uatsavarianMof 
9 fe^ to an II fdelMeyarrfad0acmttoastre^(Lafli- 
|rf«ht Laae) oMMd <rf ao laM « NQiAid and of «A 
hmtoik.4 torn vm ywd s^Nid^ ^^m1 of 10 f«« « 



required (accessory building - storage shed) on Lot 28, 
Block 7. Section 10, Princess Anne Plaza, 3128 Coach 
House Lane. Princess Anne Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Virginia Beach Bank of Commerce requests a varian- 
ce to allow parking in the required setback along both 
35th Street and the 20 foot alley adjoining the south 
property line where prohibited and to allow parking in 
the required setback where prohibited when a commer- 
cial district (B-4) adjoins a residential or apartment 
district (west side) on Lots A & B. Block 108, Linkhorn 
Park, 306 35th Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
W. L. Towers 
Secretary 
2T11/24VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, Decem- 
ber 13, 1982, at 2:00 P.M. at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSinCATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Clyde L. Collier 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-2 Apartment District to A- 
3 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
North side of North Greenwell Road beginning at a 
point 36.48 feet West of Northampton Boulevard, run- 
ning a distance of 506.37 feet along, the North side of 
North Greenwell Road, running a distance of 267.19 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 464.42 feet along the Northern property line, ruiuiing 
a distance of 147.08 feet along the West side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard and running a distance of 122.57 
feet in a Southerly direction. Said parcel contains 3.015 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: '^ ^ 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Hunt Contracting 
Co., Inc. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to P- 
1 Preservation District on property located on the North 
side of Parliament Drive, 400 feet more or less West of 
Yoder Lane, as shown on plats on file in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company. A General Partnership for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to B-2 Community-Business District 
on certain property located on the East side of General 
Booth Boulevard b^nning-at; a point 480 feet more or - 
less South of South Birdnfcck Road, running a distance *' 
of 316.10 feet along the East side of Geno^ Booth '^ 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet more or Ic^s 
along the Southern' property line, running a dist^ce of 
230 feet more or less in a Northeasterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 90 feet more or less in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 45.65 feet in a Northerly 
direction and running a distance of 191 .87 feet along the 
Northern property line. Said parcel contains 1.496 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of Holiday Lake 
Company, A General Partnership for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to O-l Office District on certain 
property located on the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard beginning at a point 800 feet more or less 
South of South Birdneck Road, running a distance of 
340 feet along the East side of General Booth 
Boulevard, running a distance of 130 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 340 feet 
along the Eastern property line and running a distance 
of 130 feet along the Northern property line. Said par- 
cel contains 1.01 acre. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of J. C. Witcher, 
Jr., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for two 
duplexes on property located on the South side of 12th 
Street, 100 feet East of Rudee Avenue. Said parcel is 
known as Lots 5. 6, 7 and 8, Block 118, Lakewood, and 
contains 9.979 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon An>lication of Virginia Beach 
United Methodist Church for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for an addition to a church on property 
located at the Northeast comer of 18th Street and 
Pacific Avenue on Lots 14 thru 22. Block 32, Plat No. 
2, Virginia Beach Development Company. Said parcel is 
located at 207 18th Street and ccmtuns 1.446 ao-es. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Application of Kimmel 
Automotive, Inc. T/A Treadquart^s. for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for mounting and balancing 
tires on certain property located cm the North side of 
Shore Drive b^innbig at a pomt 160 feet more or less 
West of Pleasure HoiMe Road, running a distance of 
ISO feet along the Nwth side of Siore Drive, rumung a 
distance of 200 fe^ along the W^^n property Hne, 
running a distance of 150 feet akog the Northern 
j»-<q>erty Uiw and miudng a disluM of 200 feet along 
the Eastern vfopfttf Une. Said pared it kxarted at ^16 
Shore Drive and contains 30,000 square feet. BAYSII^ 
BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upmi ^)|McatioB of ForeU Farm 
Devdo|Hnent Corporf^m, ot Ai^iai, for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a ISO room motel on 
tain property located am the Bast ride of Boney Roki 
banning at a p<rfat 800 feet matt or i«a SraOeast of 
the intersection of Bcmney RomI i^ la^^^m&mu 
Boutevard, rwiativ a cHUuoe of \10 fe^ more or less 
d<^[ tlM OM Me ^ Bo^i^ RMd, running a dktawx 
at Mi.97 fe« hi a M)ftk^rt«-ly dbecti<m, n^^ a 
diMnce of 66.40 feet ta a Norttwcsterly Section, run- 
vim • dlituoe of 40 fe^ ta » W^My Arec^on, run- 
ning a dirtaace of 44.70 ket ta a Sonthwci^fly (&ec- 
tkn, m^^ a ikimm ot WtttL la a Westo^ d^c- 
tfM. nmUm « Ammm otmtmfAa So^hwaMy 
tfrec^km, vma^ a AlMee stti 1miilm% WeMeriy 



direction, runnii^ a distance of 52.70 feet ii» a North- 
westerly dirMtion. running a distance of 39.60 feet in a 
southwesteriy direction, running a distance of 29.80 feet 
in a Westerly direction, running a distance of ^ feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 55.31 fe^ in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of :^1.86 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
135.53 feet in a Southeasto-ly dkection and nmnlng a 
distance of 365.23 feet in a Southwesterly direction. 
Said partel contains 3.476 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Putt-Putt Golf 
and Games for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
miniature golf course on certain property located on iini 
South side of Lynnhaven Parkway banning at a pdnt 
750 feet more or less East of South Lynnhavm Road, 
running a distance of 196 feet along the South side of 
Lynnhaven Parkway, running a distance of 469 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 40 feet in 
a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 278 feet 
in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 41 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 62 feet in 
a Northeasterly direction and miming a distance of 238 
feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 2 
acres. PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

10. An ordiiuuice upon Application of William N. 
Thompson for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for an 
automobile repair establishment on property located on 
the North side of Holland R(Md, 93 feet East of Gar- 
field Avenue on Lots 17 thru 20, Block 8. Pecan Gar- 
dens. Said parcel contains 32.187.4 square feet. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1 1 . Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Of ficen in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for James E. Moore, Sr. Property 
located at the Western extremity of the intersection of 
River Road and River Court and contains 7.84 acres. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

12. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Richard W. Galliford. Property 
located at 836 South Spigel Drive and contains 2.32 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

atyClerk 

173-11 2T 12-1 VB 



Souza Distinguished 



UgriNetice 



LEGAL NanCE. 
Take notice that on 
November 29, 1982 at 
10:00 a.m. at the premises 
of Tidewater Imports, 
Inc. DBA Hall Pontiac 
GM(!: Honda, Inc. 3152 
Virginia Beach Bldg.. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction. 



for cash, reserving unto it- 
self the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicles: 
1981 Pontiac /IT-IOOO. 
Serial #1G2AM0892BY23- 
1843: 1982 Jeep CJ-7: 
#1JCCM87A3CT064324. 
Tidewater Imporis, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac 
GMC Honda, Inc. 
F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
173-12 1T11-24VB 



City Activities 
Are Announced 



The City of Virginia Beach has announced the 
following November Calendar of events: 

Thursday, Nov. 25 

Thanksgiving Day - Virginia Beach RecrMtion Cen- 
ter/Bow Creek, Virginia Beach Recreatlcm Center/ 
Kempsville, closed. Schools closed. 

Friday, Nov. 26 

7 - 10 p.m. - Countryside Christmas Market. 
Pavilion. Contact: Pavilion. 428-8000. 

8 - 9 p.m. - Bingo Night. Vir^a Beach Recreation 
Coiter/Kempsville. Contact: Vu-ginia Beach Recreation 
Coiter/Kempsville, 49^-1892. 

Saturday, Nov. 27 

10 a.m. - 9 p.m. - Cmmtryvide Christmas Market, 
Pavilion. Contact: Pavilion - 428-8000. 

Sunday, Nov. 28 




- 6 p.m. - Countr^de Christmas Market, Pavilion. 
Contact: Pavili(M) -428-8000. 



Call Health Depi. 



Sewerage Disposal 
Info Is Dispensed 



The Virginia Beach He- 
^th Department inftnns 
residents ot new regvhttt- 
ou «»Mming huidllng 
ai^ dispoaal of sewerage. 
Ttese reg uhtttoiu govern 
primarily the InstMBi^n 
and <g»erati^ ot scp^ 
tanks whfcb are currently 
toe Act. 

li MWtk» to settn^ 

§p^Uk 0teria for ^ 

JaMaHati<» of septic 

^^riBp Hm MW regvhi^sm 

•Stress tte traasportatloa 



<rf sewage, both pump and 
haul, sewage handkn, 
and the plaMment at-^ 
vatc weOs on lou Uutt wlU 
also revive a se^lc tank. 
Sute heakh iiflkMto 
have preiNind a svnutfy 
ctf the regiriatttM cit- 
ing to h^na't mmm 
wl^ must be Aout to 
eampiy with them. For 

taa. te CUf flf Vbii^ 
Bw^ Bav h oM— i^i Pb* 
^thnvbloatt427.«MI. 



Wayne G. Souza, a 
^Hrginla Beach attomey, 
has been named one of 
four 19K2 Dfatingulshwl 
Alumni ai North C^olina 
Wesleyan College in 
Rocky Mount. 

Souza, who received a 
iMi^dor of arts d^ree 
firom Wesleyan hi 1973, 
was recently honored at 
tibe coU^e during Foun- 
da» Day activitin. 

N.C. Wesleyan College 
is a jvivate four-yrar co- 
educational liberal arts in- 
stitution founded 26 years 
ago. 

The Distinguished 
Alunmi Awards are given 
annually to alumni who 
have made outstanding 
contributions in one of 
three areas; professional 
achievmient, community 



SCTvice and service to th< 
collie. 

Souza was named 
Distinguished Alumni for 
service to the collie. 

His nomination cited 
his work in three suc- 
cnsful fund-raising years 
for the Alumni 
Association with the 1992 
alumni pft total exMedmg 
$19,000 for the flrst time 
ever. It was Souza's 
aggressive leadership that 
started the climb from 
$4,000 ui alumni gift m- 
come m 1978 to this year's 
record figure. 

Souza, who is a member 
of the Lamplighter's 
Giving Chib, has also been 
ui student recruitment in 
the Vir^nia Beach and 
Norfolk arM. 



Farmers' Classes 
Are Scheduled 



Virginia Beach farmers 
have a Private Pesticide 
Applicator Permit that 
expries ui 1982 or 1983, 
plus to attend on of the 
following scheduled 
recertification training 
classes: 
< Tuesday, Dec. 14. 8:30 
a.m.: Tuesday, Dec. 14, 7 



p.m.; Monday, Dec. 20, 
8:30 a.m.; and Monday, 
Dec. 20. 7 p.m. 

All classes will be con- 
ducted at the Virginia 
Beach Departmient of 
Agriculture Conference 
Room at the Municipal 
Center. Classes will last 
about two hours. 



Children's Products 
Are Re-Called 



The Virginia Beach 
Coasvaner Protection Div- 
ision has recently learned 
of two child-related prod- 
uct recalls by the Coisu: 
mer Product Safiety Com- 
missitm. . 

First, Creative Playth- 
ings has issued a. renewed 
warning for thefi- Indoor 
Gym Houses manufactur- 
ed tram 1962 through 
1972. This latest warning 
was issued when a 3Vi 
year old child became 
entrapped between the 
upper rung and platform 
on an unmodified ladder. 
To request a replacement 
ladder, call the firm's toll 
free number at (1) 800- 
847^359. 



Second, Reliance Prod- 
ucts Corp<n-ation announc- 
ed a voluntary recall of the 
"Protecto Hold Me Tlte" 
squeeze torp. Assortment 
#06233. The recall is the 
result (rf the danger of 
chtridng and/m suffoca- 
tion they pose^ OMuum- 
ers should return this 
product to their retailer 
for a full refund or return 
the toy to Reliance Pro- 
ducts Corporation, 108 
Mascm Street, Post Office 
Box 1220 Woonsocket, 
Rhode Island. 

For ftirther infonnati<» 
on either one <tf these two 
recalls, contact the Wgi- 
nla Beach Consumer Pro- 
tecticm Division at 427- 
4421. 



Continental 
Re-structures 
Its Management 



i 



* 



Continental Telephcme 
of Vurgmia is reo-ganizing 
its management structure 
effective January 1, 1983, 
according to its President, 
Wllliaffl Dales. 

Dales sidd the two most 
significant changes are 
the creati(Hi <^a telephcme 
services department and 
the consoUdatitm of geog- 
raphlc servinf areas. 

"We're combining our 
existing network services 
and customer services de- 
IMUtment," Dales said. 
"The new telephone ser- 
vices ^iwrtment wiU be 
responsible for our Fhaau 
Fain, business offices, 
hutaUation and repair, 
cabte maintenaoM, serv- 
iM centers, and switching 
equipment cM^s." 

Dales added that the 
network design depart- 
ment will continue to Im 
tetpamMe tor i^iutog, 
ei^ineering a^ ^nstroc- 
tkm. 

"De reorganization 
shottU have a ^ssitive 
tap^ on service to our 
railo^s heoMse Ito 
M^ orgaite^M wii an- 
Ale us w turnip mote 
•fildcBt^," said Dates. 

C^mtlaentftl's Phmte 
Fi» nd tasiness oA» 
teuton win iMt Ou^a. 
Am* an 1} am^ Umn- 
ites ta Vlrglnhi: Mam^ 



sas, Woodbridge. Harri- 
sonburg, Bowling Green, 
Warsaw, Kilmarnock, 
Gloucester, Princess 
Anne. Smithfield, Frank- 
lin, Emporia, Chase Qty 
and Amherst. 

January 1, Continental 
will structure its 92 exch- 
anges into three mana- 
gement districts. The 
Northern district will con- 
sist of the Harrhfmburg, 
Manassas and Woodbr- 
idge servli^ areas. The 
Eastern distrkt will con- 
sist of the Chancelter, 
Staff(»-d, Bowling Green, 
Warsaw, Gtoucester, Smi- 
thfield and Princess Anne 
serving areas. The Sout- 
hern dbtrte will «»sist of 
the FrankUn. EmpOTia, 
Chase Qty and Amhent 
serving areas. 

There wiU be a mana- 
ger-telephone services 
and a manager-eng leer- 
ing and (»astrtt»ton In 
each of the three dist^ts. 

Ml Farmer, mm eaai- 
omer serves manager to 
Harrisonburg, will be- 
ecme manager-telephcne 
services for tte Bwtem 
dntrkt. 

Lawrence Pitt, now 
wori^ to Mtwork des^ 
at C^Mncntal's state 
headquarters, will be- 
«i^ aMH^«r««af taMr- 
'm§ m^ w^tnMloa te- 
the Eastern <tetriM. 



nv 






"3^ 



Virginta BMch Sun, Novemba 24. 1982 17 



-547-4571 





1. 



4.AHIM 



l^Mip WmtM 



Qu Aunr upHfosiiity 

REFINISHINO ■ K yeani 
experience on ThoniMvillc, 
Drexel, Ethan Allea, Drew, 
Cling and lOncud. We alw do 
antiquing and «U klmfo of 
repaks. 9Q3 Hi^ Staeel, Pw- 
Umouth.VA 399-9056. 

l-*r-I2/l 



GROW YOim OWN fRUTT. 

Free copy 48 pg Planti^ (taide- 
Catak^ in <»lor. (tac of the 
moit complete linei of {^anting 
material offered in Virjnia in- 
cluding fruit trees, nut trees, 
berry planu, grape vines, lan- 
dscaping plant material. 
Waynesboro Nurseries, Inc., 
Waynesboro V A 22980. 
14TI2-r 

JUNK CAKS AND TS^OB ^ 

towed free. Some bougbt. Call 
485-1961 or 485-5859. 

GUN SHOW •Dccemb7r 
18th and 19th 1982. Virgiiiia 
BEach Dome, 19th and Pad&. 
Shop for Chrktoias. 
1-6T-I2/15 

NEED CREDIT HELP? - 

Receive a Mastercard or Visa, 
Guaranteed, Nobody refuted; 
for free teocbure «aO House of 
Credit. ToU Free 1-8Q(M41-1531 
ANYTIME. 

1-4T-12/1S 



FORD - 1966 CustOAi, 289 
Engine, Automatic transnrisrion, 
radio, heater, tinted windows all 
around, 4 door,, all c^ginai^ 
runt great, tooks good, no rutt»,, 
motw and powa tnip oevw 
gone into. Original miles ami less 
than 95,000. Qrilector's item, 
need money for CSiriAmas. must 
sdl. *500. Call Dave at 5474571 
betwera 8:30 and 5:00, and after 
5:30, caU 4^-0990. 

4TFN ' 

FORD GRANADA - tm, looks 
like new, am/fm cut^te, new 
tires, #12 linpetSioa. Low down, 
owner flaai^iig. C^ 4^-0114, 

MHm. 

DATSON • ISM, .1971. 
nitomatic, am/An c^ktte, good 
tnuuport«tk», low down, owner 
will finance. ^Call 483-0114 

4-IT-12/1 

CSEVY - OtaUra, 1980, air. 

low mileage, auMmatic, excdioit 

conditixm. $3,990. CaH anytftae 

481-7924. 

44T12-8 

CHEVy-1980 Monza, 2 door, 
an/fa 8 track, 4 i^Oader, good 
on gat. Good condition. Sa,00O. 
CaU422-9039. 

4-4T-I1/24 . 



2.Hnnnk 



S.Tnicltt 



RECEIVE A MASnRCARD 

OR Visa. OuaraiMeed, irabody 
reftised; for ftee brodnire call 
House of Credit, toU free 1-80O- 
442-1531 anytime. 

2TFN 



DATSUN - 1979, King Cab, 5 
speed, over-drive, AM/FM 
stereo cassette. Camper Shdl, 
33,000 miles. $4700. QUI 423- 
3386 or 4444495 and ask for 
Smith. 

54TU 



3.UttaNMMl 






LOST GERMAN 8HEPARO 

PUPPY - Finale, Mack and tan. 

St near 23M street, Virginia 
Kdi. lunmi, CBU^I^4i 
or after4p.m. 481-1147. 

hOziim 

LOST DOG - Small grey and 
white male, kmg hair, grey em 
and oirly tail. Deep 0«dc area. 
$100 reward. CID 487-7335. 
CI I'^iprl: ; 3-4T-12/15 
-tr^Huf io\bHf 4U!»1" 




UMOffiW •1913, new tires, new 
altouttor, new battery, etc.. J8Q0 
orbcM i^er. CaD 547-4971 (toys 
or 464-4402 evenings. Arte for 
Do^ 

MERCIDES BENZ - 300 Deisd, 

89,500 miles. Record Book 
Value is SI 1,000. CaO 5^3158. 

4-1T-H/24 

CAMARO - 2rfS, 6 eyiinder, 3 
qieed,< tted belted radials, low 
mileace. Runs tood. $2300. 
CaU 468-2000 or 468-0885. 

- 4-rT.n/u 

MUNANG - 1967. Special 
editiOB, dark blue, 2 door. Must 
adl. As is $1400. CaO 420-3512 
or 547-2131. 

*-lT-»l/24 

(HJM • 1976, Cutlan StqiraBe, 
Blue, new paint job, fully 
loaded, extra nice. $2100. Call 
9M-5445 w 583-6542 or 480- 
3047. 

4-iT-ii/y 

CADILLAC - 1977, Coupe 
De^Be. Hack oa Btacfc. Cobta 
roof, v«y good ctmdidon. 
S4800. Cd 4844708. 

Muim 

CHBVWH.^- 19^ iBWda. 

necA a«iae rqimr. Best offer. 

Cani87-19M. 

4-1T-12/15 

CHEViTTE • tfTS, wMtawith 
radi« stripes, 2 dixa, am/ta 
cassette, very relUUe, low 
milci«e. S2200 negotialiie. CaU 
481-2635. 

4-lT-lVl 

nNTO - 1973, WagoB, good 
conditkm. $»0. OiB»7-3«2S. 

i^Mim 

pLynMNiTH . an. Doiiw, 2 

door, 318. VB amanrtfr, mi 
good, $799. CUI 483-6599. 

*-lT-»l/24 

nmo ' Vn, C^md Toitoo. 
mgw. 1 oMNT, «9^M0 aOai. 
mOBmitic, poww Moi^g, lAr, 
new obtwot 0t»aa, aem tnm 
tfaes. RrTftlf ff' i^MdMow. QM 
«a-lS23. 

4-1T-I2/1 

*-«T-12/l 



CHEVROLET TRUCK .{ 

3/4 ton. needs dutch. $900 firm! 
CaU 588-3088. 

— . i^vhiim 

FORD TRVCX • 1961, pidc up. 
M ton, excellent ccmditkm, tmt 
drcs, new inspection. $795. C^ 
485-3173. 

HLiim 

CHEW TRUCK • 1988, CIO 

pick-up, Vi ton, cKelleat qqo- 
dition. 6 cylindCT, nmning boar- 
ds, am/ta stereo, air, camper 
shdl.$5895. CaU 855-8187. '^"•■"' 

1 3-1T-1I/24 

TOYOTA - 1981, Mg bedi > 
canqicr cap, ^, am/fm tape, 5 
qwed. $5550. QiH 467-5781. 

5.1T-11/24 



NEm EXTRA MONEY? SeU 

Av(m. Part time. If interested 
call fibencbi at 427-1444. 

HHT-»/<? 

.PART TIME International 
"Conipany haa ppcniiigs for 
pei^ tirho are of Mid-Bairtem 
and Ariaa oilpn a«l U-Lii«ual. 
CaU463-U61. 

VHT-imf 

PART TIME SAU» - SeU 
custom jewelry. Ideal for 
housewives, students. Not 
tekiAonesi^. R»r information 
caU Ridabow B^tapA^H 486- 
0061. 

104T.12/1S 

TO&tUmE SALES - Mor- 
ning and evoting Iwtn, salary 
4nd bonuses. No experienM 
necessary. We train. Oreia for 
students and housewives. CaU 
627-1999. 

HMT.12/H 

MAKE UP TO A S19BJ8 fot 
Satunhqr work, takl^ Soiut sur- 
vey. Mnt be 18 or older CaH Liz 
or Scott 10 a.m. Ifll 8K» p.m. 
CaU 497-5038. 

»HT-iyi? 

TELEPHONE RE8ER- 
VATIONKT — Fantastic opper- 
tunity in solar. Excellent 
product. No: seUing, no ex- 
perioice necessary. CaU Uz 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. for personal in- 
terview. 497-5038. 
: |<HT-t2/l ? 

GOVEflNMENTJOBS 

Immediate openings overseas 
and domestic. 20,000 to 50,000 
plus a year. CaU 1-312-920-9675 
ext. 1447A. 

lO-IT-ll/ 

$106 DAILY-earnings working 3 
hours a day at home. Ytnir ear- 
nings fully guaranteed in writing. 
For complete details and ap- 
' plication, please send a self ad- 
dressed envelope to: E.V.,272C 
'vRocco Dr., Harrisonburg, VA 
22S01. 

10-4T-11/24 



11a rMniMIS WMttfl 



GENERAL MOUSEcleaning, 
reUable and experioiced. CaU 
, 340-1389. - 



11 Pits 



7. Mttwcycha 



BIG SIDS • MOnM CYCLES 

AND Mopcds bougte. sold, 
tune-ups, repairs, and ac- 
cessories, lowest prices and best 
(puUty. Parts and ten4oe. Lay' 
away Mopeds for Chrtotmas 
now. Caa461-t9S9. 
74T-12/15 

BCmDA - 1979OL-1000. 11,700 
ndles, am-fm stereo and cassette 
tape deck. Hack with goU trim. 
Conqjlete tour kit. '3,500. CaU 
547-8413 after 5 p.m. 

TFN 



SiBtitf 



ALIAHNVM BOAT • 14lc( ' 

equiived with 3H HP motcw and 

tzaUor. Good eooditiim. $500j i 

QiU42IM»5. 

, HT-»/24 

CARLSON lET BOAT - t978, 
23 foot, caddy odiin. Tandem 
Traito, low hours and fast. 
AtUiig $6,985. CaU 460-3573. 
Afte 5 can 481-0096. 

■ 8-TFN 

IS' FIBERGLASS BOAT- 

Bvinrudc HMKor, traUer'tan^ided. 
>yi in good shape. Must teU. 
$750 «■ best offer. CaH 4634550. 
^ 8 

ANGLER • 19 FOOT 

FIBERGLASS, TRAILER, 
ISBEf V, 120 Molcruiser, ia- 
board/oudward. Low hours. 
A-loonttioa. $5.^». Qril482- 
1391. 

8-1T-11/24 



16.Artiel8tFBrSdB 



420-2782. 



MARAUnai - 1W3, 35', Kver 
occupied, patto door, large 
iefrl >Bi ato r, air, 8 x 12 Mn^. 
Mutt vUl. VU M^rflec tm 
$7900 <^ 4n4XB5 or 485-^. 
94ri24 



M. 



CHEVROLET - 1974, I^Mda 
Wagon, automatic, poww 

«eif^ mrf fa^». rt*. •«• 

W^iSOidB, HAMnr MAN^iUrT TMB 



TV'S ABO mms 

cash tm Ortetmas, Mack and 
white (M- color. PcMrttmouth Gun 
and TV. Call3»-1M0. 

IHT-tyi? 

LADIES SKffi - E<p^meit, 

electric stove $75. BraM 

flr^tace sa«» $40. GaQ 587- 

1001. 

16-1T.U/24 

CUNA • I nMOkmm^^ 

0<^«i Palr anad^ fc^wilh 



mid Aia»l 

(HtioB.m».cdi4n<.i^. 

^ 441124 

COHVEm • 1978, shMnsMR 
^Mi«tlo^ 4 fpa«t. MI/PM 
MM, ttiWkw iMMl. T-lop, 
ym 
,SlM»Ofl«B4m. 
4ITiM7 ' 



i»n. 



4 IT 11-17 



CtfMr.D.ltet.3»Qll. 

Ifr^-t^l 

WANTED SALES- 

tm mAA and 
M»*ricntar 

fsm^sg tt ^^tcad Htae 
^taa. tavA« M L A L 
H^taWi. 9912 Warwick 
.ni4., Nw^wt Vmm, VA 

mm., oto&m^am 

»4T-ll/^ 



Bo^t for »«. WH ^ for 
S»0. Cat]*7-6784. 

t6-lT.|l<^ 

WXHI novR . Qnmk type, 
wed 1 year, $iW^-362U 

16^-12/1 



17. 



^^NING KKM CAMNKT 

v«ifr SMB 'Ht^m 
SI,a»«bMjMv.^^Mltt 
I74r-I2/15 



17. 



3 PIECE SOLID TEAKWOOD 

Stereo Cabinet - 85" IcMg, lott of 
storage space for upes and 
recOTds. Has Sony reel-to-red 
tape (feck and S(»iy reedvcr 
SR605O, 30 watte p« duand. 2 
Suitui speakers, SP2000. Space 
to cabinet Ua tunMaUe. All for 
$800. CaU 588-5811. 

17 TFN 

SOFA - LAIK;E 3 cushicmed. 
black vinyl. Good condition. 
CaU424-»99. 

17'IT-ll/y 

TWO CHAIRS F(» ROOT • 

Green Run, Tlmbertoke vc«. 
CaB49S-lll4. 

l7-iT-ll/2* 

FURNITURE -Wardrobe, 
china, l^t fixtures, buffet, cor- 
ner cupboard, plus many varioia 
items. CaU 420-2782. 

-_ |7-lT-||/af 

TRADITIONAL SOFA -and 
dwir. Rust and bdge floral 
background, Uke new. $400. 
CaU 545-2081. 

17-1T-12/17 

FUEZjn - 17 CU. FT. Coa- 
tinentd, very good coiidition. 
Reas<Hi«ble price. CaU after 6:30 
p.m. 463-3151. 

- i?-iT-u/y 

ALL TYPES A-1 -Used freexers, 
refrigNators, $100 and up. 
Clean, warranty, deUvoy. We 
alsd buy, trade and rqpair. CaU 
583-9478. 

15-IT-11/24 

UVING ROOM SUITE .5 pico^ 
$350. Can 853-3898. 

17-11-11/24 



18.temNM 



GERMAN SHEPARD Pup- 
pies - >UCC registered, for pd 
or show. $150 and up. 
COUNTRY SQUIRE 
SHEPAkOS. CM 4884085. 
13-TFN 

SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 
Point, registered; champion 
aired, show qugUty, S200. 481- 
3358 

UIEfci 

NANDAY CONOUR - Part 
hand tamed, young bird. Can be 
taught to talk, ca^ included. 
Moving must seU. $75. CaU aflo- 
6.497-6280. 

. 131TN 

COCKER SPANIEL PUPS - 

AKC regisiercd, 3 beautiful mate 
and female. Taking deposits 
m>w. WiU deliva for Quittmas. 
S200. must see. caU 468-1 148. 

134T12-8 

STUD SERVICE • Cocker AKC 
registae^ 2 year old male, 
champayne, very persistaK. 
Pick of tiie Utter, (fee). CaU 
anytime 484-8371. 

13-1T-11/24 

BIRDS - CUTE and cuddly Love 
Bir^. Affectioniue Uttle pete. 
CaU 421-9554. 

13-4T-12/I5 



ANTIQUE REPAnS -Autiw^ 

reproductions of hand crafted 

furniture in old world style. CaU 

421-9554. 

18-1T-11/24 

IVORY COLLECTION - 

Statues, Netsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne 
necklaces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
granby St., 62S-91 19. Dally 10-5. 
IBTFN 

SERIOUS. COLLECTOR ^ 

jUre.dppe^W^i .Ug fc S lil ff - 
tion of BrhisI). AtttoffoWIe 
magazines. Oldest in the worUk 
^ng back to 1922. CaU 587- 
1226 or 466-2054. 

182T 11-24 



20. Itasicri hntnNMNts 



n.T^vMM/Sttrat 



HELP CUAN YOUR ^PTIC 
TANK - the EASY WAY with 
FX bacteria. $7.98. Tree roMs 
ren»>ved. Hadx* opened. Ask 
for FREE Booklet. TRUE 
VALUE HOME CENTER. 
1609 LaAin Rd. Va. Beadi, Va. 
IHT-ia/l? 



22.NVi8by 



2S.«o«tfTMBpTBlrt 



SS.IIiM«tF«rll«it 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Siucked in own natural juices. 
By quarts, itote, or bushels. CaU 
340-5171. 

ikSMim 

VaSXL FLCHODA FSUIIS • 

Sweet and jiricy. SddbyBqnde 
High Sdiod Band. CaU 497- 
7198 or 497-8766. 

iHioka* 

FRESH INDIAN UVER 

FRUIT - INred from Rorida. 
Sold by Indian River High 
School. To place order CaU 424- 
1615 or 424-3099. 

25-4T-12/15 



TOWNHOUSE FC« RENT - 

Deowood Tracx, 3 bedroom, 
\Vi bath, firqdace, fenced back 
yard. $425. CaU 467-3462. 
, %'i-\1'\y\ 

KDROCNWS Fmt RENT - $25 

a week with kitchen priviledges. 
Chreat Bridge area. CaU 547- 
5749. 

35 2T 11-24 






am* UWniMMMn 



FMSALE-TOBaUroomdano^ 
lessons. Cdl Larry DliBn for! 
more taiformatioa 480-2154. 

■26-TFN' 

■ 



27. GmiB/YiN 



DEBCMAH'S FLEA MiOUUT 

• Antiques, near MiUtary Circle. 
Openl0to6. Mon thru Sunday. 
CaU 461-9744. 

27-41-12/15 



28. F l r w ss d 



HREWOOD • Hardwood.- 1 
cord, $100. 2 cord $200ot 3 cor- 
ds $285. CaU 488-3764. 

HeSSiOm 

HREWOCH) ^fixed hardwood, 
$50 Vi cord. $90 cord. Virginia 
Beach, CaU 426-2974 or 721- 
3277, 

28-IT-ll/a4 



WOODLOCK - By owner, 
assume 7 3/4% Townhouse. 3 
bedroom, 1 Vi bath, air, consider 
2nd mmgage or your own finan- 
cing $295. per month. CaU 463- 
5376. 

3<^4T-12/1S 

HIGHLAND ULTMORE - 3 
bedroom. Equity and assume 
8Vi% VA loan, many types 
finandng avtilable. CaU for ap- 
pdntment 399-5706. 

364T-12/15 

AVERY fmmM& N.C. • Old 
trap Pasquotank River, 1 hour 
from Norfdk. 1/4 acre. 42' 
bulkhead wfth pier. 2 bedroom, 
fully fkmddied tiwier with large 
en^Med pordi and garage. 
$26,000 001464-1816. 

?^ IT-U/2 4 

IF YOU WANT • a large 
retiremant home in the hUls of 
North Candina caU 487-1509 for 
mformatioA. 

36-4T-12/15 



$7.UtsFM-Salt 



29.LiwiiftteriM 



PIANO HARDMAN Duo 

player. Blonde finish with b«ich, 
l^yer ne«l$ retubing $600 CaU 
.397r5167. 

20-1T-11/24 

ORGAN • HAMMOND fxper 
auto diord. Uke new. $300. 
CaU 480-2000. 

2Q-1T-11/24 

ORGAN. CASIO keyboard. 14 
vtrices. 16 rhythm. Uke new. 
$275. Ask for Jerry 484-7014. 

»-lT-U/?4 

HAMMOND ORGAN 4n ex- 
ceUent condition. Beautifiil fur- 
mture piece. 2 keyboards and 
bench. Good for entertainment. 
»50. Calf 855-4502. anytime. 

a HT -i a/i ? 

PLU^O - RECONIHnCM)(ED 

and toned, good for beginners. 
S500. Beautiful oak witii bach, 
wiU tune. $1200 or bett offer. 
Odl 623-3081. 

20-4T-12/15 



FRUrr TREES-Nul trees, berry 
planu, grape vines, landscaping 
ptant material-offered by one of 
Virginia's largest growers. 'Free 
copy of 48 page Planting Guide 
Cdalog in «>lor on request. 
Waynes Boro Nurseries, Inc., 

/Wa)ntesboro. Va. 22980. 

J J 2»4T-ll/24 

\6 ■ ' '--1^-^^^ '"'-' ^ 

, . Acntm TaixsB»«s . A 

' profenional ooi^tete tree ser- 
vice., 20 yean experkaoe. 

^Ucenied jtnd insured. Free 
estimate. CaU 399-7011. 

' SaJIN 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
whik on sale. We ddiver in one 
; day. 833-0250 or 855-7467. 

291TN 

JOYNER PROFESSIONAL 
LANDSCAPING and town ser- 
vice. Free estimates. 543-4949. 

291TN 



PINE STRAW Fmt SALE - By 

die truck load. WUI ddiver. CaU 
547-8588. 

292T11-24 

FENCE - CHAIN Unk, wood 
picket, aU types iiutall and 
rqwired. Catt for free estimate 
now and save 10%. 853-9193. 

29-4T-12/15 



VIRGINIA BEACH-Cape Story 
bytiieSea. $29,90U. By owner. 
CaU 215-7$2-1876 for more in- 
formation. 

37-4T-11/24 

CAPE COLONY - North 
CaroUna. Beautiful wooded, 
waterfront lot. On Abemarle 
Sound. Restrictive residential lot 
in ideal location near Edenton 
North Car<rffau. CaU 4204768 
for more information. 

37-IT-11/24 



"HUXCREST - 1973, 12 by 52, 2 
bedroom, as is for $4000. Now 
in storage. CaU 424-3938. 
3841-12/15 

HOLLY PARK - 12 by 60, 3 bed- 
room, wood stove, furnished, all 
appliances induded, heats by 
propane gas, aU gas. May stay on 
lot. NAS Oceana area. Perfer 
MUttary. $9,000. Call anytime 
425-0306. 

38 41 12-8 



39. Frtf tnloMi SmvIcm 



MAGNAVOX-TV, console, very 
^wd ccmdition. $300. CaU 424- 
12M. 

214T-11/24 



STORES AND STORAGE 
Anus • AU dm. Prt^trties 
onUmited. Marvin Goldfarb. 
399-8390.484-1275. 

32TFN. 



niDAL ^T • WUte goU, ex- 
odient conditton, $300 or best 
offer. CaU 853-8078. 

22dZdlZ24 

LAMES JEWELS Y POR SAU 
One bulks cocktaU ring with 45 
diamtrnds and is 14 cantt ycUow 
gold. Also a 14 cantt «Mte gcrid 
23 Jewd tadks Bdova watdi, 
Rfa« annked at »400 and 
iMch viHdied d $1900. WUI 
s^ fkSaa fw half die apiH^cd 
value. CaU 547-0858 after 5H» 

22'ITN 



OFIKE »ACE FOR Rra<T - 3 

latie oorae^ag roMnt. Private 
ottraaoe. Cfreat %ni^ area. 
Call 547-5749. 

n^xHm 

POVraMOUTH - 2315 C-1, 
WA office and wardiOuse fw 
sde or rent. CM owner 397- 
5881. 

32-4T-12/15 






D 



MINK CAU Wredml m run- 
^if. mSb^vt toiriM. W« ito 
buy oaid mUaMn aad baneritt. 
7 dq« a wade. Ctf 4174222 or 
tflar6pjB.340-U^. 

34WN 

CAM PAD - Vtq^ Beaf 
j^qw C^. vn% a«h ft* an- 
<M tanAMe, docks. 




,«rtMdi 
i^A|M Wf%. We bqp one ^aoe 

CM ^4m 
la.a.^6p.n. 

MIfN 



DVPUX • CHESAPEAKE 

BsmIi, 2 bedswm. m b^i. 1 
bkx:k from b^di. Ika^ 
wooded ^trd with ki«e deck, 
(U^waAer, ^rbage d^wsal, 
oeiH^i^. beat puav. 547-^71 
cky«Mrii»iiwlBgl«»44<tt. Ask 
for Doug. 

3HT-U/a4 

OOiN RUN - in Virginia 
nurti, Aparcn^ fw adiAs. 1 
mA % baftooei Ouden ^^ and 
2ba*oMBMrohOHta. Wcpay 
had oi hot wiMr. TlMPtaet. 
CU4a.»00. 

^ 33-TFN-ll/^ 

APAmONT hsadquar- 

Omt fcl^. 4 

. I^om %B. RcBtel 
<rfne^ «M373. niBlwgi «&. 
14B2. 3C» JiteHMwn bid. 

33TPH 



BCXMCING SERVICE -including' 
quartaly payroU reports and 
bank account reconciliation. 
SpedaUzing in smaU proprdtLW-^ 
sinpt. Pick up and deUvery. 
Rehired profesdond. CaU 420- 
5624. 

39TFN 

INCCMIE TAX • and Accoun- 
ting Onduding tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revmue Agoit, 
3707 Viqtaiia Beadi Blvd. (near 
Rotemoat Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 
3813T1-12 

BOOKKEEPING-Monthly ' 

baiftice<dket, PAL, detaUed 
tiki balance from your ducks 
and rece^, stubs, or registo' 
tapes. 94L's and VA-S's. Up 
to 200 checkbook transactions 
monthly; '45. Payables, 
recdvabte, small payroU. 
C3ies«peake only. CaU 420- 
.6623. 

39-TFN 

SCH.VE MONEY WCHWIES 

How* \o hdp solve money 
wOnicel Let datdried ads in 
your ho — e te wn newspaper s^ 
thj^s you BO kMger.need and 
can do without. Low om and 
qukkac^gl 




Fori 



of taqFert, 
In yaw 
lew cod 



iito 
Od 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Homt sites for safe 

for 

People Ptanning 

Homes d Custtm 

^ilden 

SALES OFFICE 
333 PTOvkfoMe M. 



CALL 464-f 317 



40.Sfryi6M 



TYPING-AU kinds, resumes, 
term papers, 10 yean experience. 
Reasonable Rates! Upon 
request, 7 days a week. Cdl 545- 
0607. 

404T-I1/24 

BOOKKEIVER - WHl do bcjpks^ 
in my home. Experienced) in 
payrool and quarterly returns. 
, Pick-up and deUVery service. 
CaU 5454096 after 5 p.m. Tor 
more information and rates. 

4P.TFN 

PLUMBING-Personalized ser- 
vice, reasonable rates. All type 
repairs, installations, 
remodeling, additions, win- 
terizing. Specid rates on drdn 
deanii^. Free estimates. AU 
work guaranteed, quaUty work. 
CaU 497-0574, day or |d^t. 
Emergency service. PAUL 
DAVIS PLUMBING. Lfcensed. 
4(MT-U/24 



tYPING SERVICE - For 

businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week, IBM Sdectric. 
Reasonable rates. C:aU dther 
467-7112, Ken^viUe trea, or 
463-(n36, HUUop/Pembroke - 

ea. 

i401». 

ANY TRASH - junk, trte Umbs, 
hauled away including concrete 
and din. Cdl 467-4075. 

404T-12/15 



41. Car p s ntry 



CARPENTRY, PAINTING, 
ROOFING - and aU types of 
maintenance. Storm windows, 
gutters and screens repaired. 
Free estimates. Sanders Con- 
struction. 420-8453. 

JITFN 



42.CiilMCar« 



CHILOCARE - My home, 
weekly or drop ins. All hours. 
Lots of TLC. Magic 

vCoUow/Brookwood School 
district. 

42-1T-12/I 

CHRISnAN CHILDCARE - 
Ages 3 and up. 8:00 to 6:00, 
Mon thru Friday. Provide 
meak. Fenced yard. A Norfolk 
Highlands home. CaU 4204283. 

42-1T-I2/1 

CHILDCARE - Newtown Road 
area, reasonable rates. CaU 466- 
0206. 

424t-12/15 

CHILDCARE - In my home. 
College Park area. D^y time, 
night time, week ends. Two 
meals and snacks. Reasonable 
rates. Newborn to 5 years old. 
Cdl 420-7144. 

: 42-1T-11/24 

CHILDCARE — Experienced 
mother would Uke to sit with 
your child in her Great Bridge 
home. Monday thru Friday. 
Hot lunches, snacks, and TLC. 
Cdl 547-2052. 

42-2T-12/1 

BABY SITTING • In my Lyn- 
nhaven area home dl ages. CaU 
463-0801. 

424T-12/15 

BABYSITTING - WiU give your 
child tender loving care. Day or 
night. CaU 4804964. 
42-1T-1I/24 

CHILDCARE - My South Nor- 
folk home, Monday thru Friday, 
wiU serve snacks and meds. Lots 
of toys and playmates. 
Reasonable raies. Cdl 543-40M. 
424T-12/I 

CHILDCARE-My Virginia 
Beach home, fenced yard, 
pkymates, will serve snacks and 
meak. WiU sit any time. CaU 
340-2225. 

42-4T- 11/24 



47. 



PAINTING - 

minor repdrs. 
Cdl 340-5391. 



WaU peering. 
Free estimates. 

47-8T-I/12 



HOME IMPROVEMENTS - 

RemodeUng, Vinyl Siding, room 
and garage additions, dorm 
windows, and ckwr. Cdl PhU d 
499-7591. 

474T-I2/15 

HOME IMPROVEMi3irTS - AU 
types rqMurs, additions, uding, 
complete remodding, sovices, 
15 years experience. Free 
estimates. CaU 4974122. 

474T-12/15 

ROOM ADDITIONS • carpm- 
try, roofing, ronodeUng, kit- 
chens, bathrooms, and dens. 
Blow texture ceiUngs and wall. 
Free estimates. CaU 853-9193. 
CaU now for an extra IWt off. 
474T-12/1I? 

ADDITIONS^ ROOMS- 

carpentry, roofing, siding, 
storm wimlow, stwm doors, 
plastering, electric, concrete 
work, plumbing, guttmng, 
remodeling, kitohen and baths, 
brick and block work, 
iduminum siding, firplaces, 
carpeting {Hunting, spedalidng 
in parking areas and driveways, 
aU type of demoUticm, free 
estimate without obU^'on, 
prompt service. Serving aU of 
Tidewater. Bonded and In- 
sured, State Roistered. CaU 
625-7435, 6234148. or 499- 
5516. 
47-TFN 

ADDITIONS - Rooms, garages, 
.convert garages, decks, etc. 
iQudity work by a Ucensed 
builder. Free estimates. CaU 340- 
25 II anytime. 

47 TFN 



48. HUllllCMIvEHCMiM 



STOP LIVING IN FEAR 

Complete Dog Training: 3 mon- 
ths to 3 years. Lic en sed from 
largest K-9 Corp. in tiie nation. 
CaU 804-481-^99. 

48 TFN 



SLFiiirtiiig 



WALLPAPERING AND 
PAlNTINGrFast and friendly 
service, local references, fur- 
nished. Call us for a free 
estimate. Arthur and Company 
Redecorating Contractors. 420- 
3478. 
51 TFN 

PAINTING - Large or smdl 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References avdkble upon 
request. Commercid work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



5& 



BATHROOM REMOMXING - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile wdls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimaes. 20 years experience in 
I Tidewater area. Smdl and lar^ 
jobs. Guarantee aU wtirk. Cdl 
5474774 anytime. 

55 TFN 



61. Vinyl 



VINYL SIDING - 20% off, first 
payment due next year. 50 year 
guarantee. Free estimates. CaU 
853-9193. CaU now for an extra 
10% off. 

6I4T-12/15 



ADDITIONS 
ilemoddlag, R^la^iDeBt 
Willows, Aay Type Of 
bBprovaMirig. 

FifcEMiBUitcs. „ 

R.H. BLACK 

399-SM9 391-1119 



When Somethliig Needs 
BuUdlDg or Repafeml, Yon Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 




HcMB^ In^oveiiiciit 
Sp^alisti 
•BuiWing 0>ntT«ctor»Roofi<itfp(»^Ckui*a 

54^-7318 



t 
■I 
1 



,j>Aarf 



BARNS ^ 

Free deliver y ^^M 

in Tidewater ^mSm 

* 3 sniB 

Quality built by: • ANY SOE 

tfAn UHi BWLons 

(919)4»41i8o.>. MOvo^iT N*c^27»so MM)421.»SiB« 



A^K. 



■r. 



dh 



m^ 



^mm 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, November 24. 1982 




A t Parker Cadillac 



Performance For '83 - Cimarron '8 



Todd Chosen 



Cadillac's Qmarron '83 
means increased perform- 
ance and enhanced driva- 
biUty for 1983. With a 
new five-speed manual 
transmission, standard. It 
sports a higher first gear 
ratio i(x more snap off the 
line than last year. As 
well as closer ratios for 
smoother shift transitions . 
And a new fifth gear 
overdrive for fuel eccxio- 
my and reduced highway 
ncMse. A 3.83 final drive 
gear ratio is standard. 



Available is a three-speed 
automatic transmission 
with increased torque con- 
verter ratios for an im- 
proved standing start. 

A new electronically 
fuel-injected 2.0 Uter en- 
gine is also standard in 
•83. Its new 2.0 liter 
displacement takes you 
from a stop with a feeling 
of confidence. Electrcmic 
fuel injecticm helps ensure 
positive delivery of fuel 
and spark advance. Here 
is a car that is quick. 



Nimble. Fun to drive. 

Qmarrcm '83 shines 
with a bdd new lode 
There's a distinctive new 
grille treatment. ..clean... 
c(mtempcH-ary...and defi- 
nitely Cadillac. With, 
tungsten halogen fog 
lamps, standard, for ex- 
clusive styling and added 
Ulumination. And a new 
hood medalli(m... bright... 
striking... uniquely Qmar- 
ron. Plus distinctive new 
aluminum alloy wheels for 
'83. 




For rcsponrivcness, dlstlnctincss and great performance. It's Cimarron for 'S3. 



Its hand-buffed exterior 
finish in any of ten cdors 
is a(xented by dual color 
painted stripes, standard. 
Three colors are exclusive 
to Qmarron: Antique Sad- 
dle, Midnight Sand Gray 
and Garnet. And you can 
personalize your Qmiar- 
r(n with such available 
features as a Power Astro- 
roof. 

The experts talk about 
its impressive lateral ac- 
celeration, steering sensi- 
tivity and rdl stiffiiess. 

Qmarron owners say 
the same thing a little 
differently. They use 
terms like these: Crisp. 
Road-hugging. Mmble. 
Fyn to drive. 

Because of Cadillac's 
exclusively turned Tour- 
ing Suspensicm, Qmarron 
'83 is as much at hone on 
a demanding Alpine road 
as it is relaxed oa the 
Interstate. And when you 
need it, firait-wheel drive 
pulls you over wet, snowy- 
surfaces with truly im- 
pressive traction. 

Take your place in the 
body-contoured, leather- 
faced, fi-ont bucket seats 
with lumbar supp(»t. 
Take hdd of the leather- 
wrapped steering wheel. 

Here is spaciousness 
and c(xnfort befitting of a 
CadiUac. With room 
enough for five adults... 
plus their luggage. Anew 
fi-ont center armrest. And 
fOT the driver, the same 
legroom found in many 
full-size cars. 

Quality nuis deep in 
Qmarron '83. In manu- 
fabturing, for example, 
advanced technofogy 
helps assure a precision- 
built autcnuAUe. With 
oyer 1000 quality ^contr^ 



checks. Rd^ots perform 
spot welds cOTrectly, time 
after time. Then, ultra- 
soiic weld testers mea- 
sure the strength of each 
weld. Body fit is audited 
by optic laser probes. 
Gamma rays inspect 
parts. And the Assembly 
Line EMagnostic Link uses 
computer technology to 
search out malfunttions 
and stOTe data for fiiture 
quality control. 

Your QmarrcHi can be 
as individual as you wish 
to make it. With available 



features such as the new 
Power Astroroof with pop- 
up air deflector, rear Ult 
q;>en feature and slidmg 
sunshade (reduces head- 
room sflghtly). Or choose 
the new Symphony Sound 
ETR Cassette Stereo Ra- 
dio with five-band gn^hic 
equalizer, loudness can- 
trd. Dynamic Noisie Re- 
duction and tape equali- 
zati(Hi and tape equali- 
zati(m switch. And you 
can enhance driving ease 
and comfort with ^e tttt 
steering wheel. 



Lewis Todd, a native 
d the Great Bridge sec- 
tion of Chesapeake, was 
chosen Salesman of th^e 
Month by Parker Cadil- 
lac. 



He has been with 
CadiUac iat 10 years, 
five of which were as a 
member of the Cadillac 
Gdden Crest Qub. 



Loves Cadillacs 

Last year Bailey T. Parker Jr. saw a beautifii! black 
1931 Cadillac sedan that he couldn't resist. 

He bought it. In fact, he bought a Cadillac dealership 
to go with his car. 

The 1931 sedan occupies a place of honor in the 
modern showroom of Parker Cadillac, at 5524 Wginia 
Beach Boulevard. 

Although he modestly shuns publidty, Parker's story 
is one that could inspire many young men. 

More than a quarter of a century ago. Parker left the 
security of the Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth to find out 
what he could Ido (xi his own with hard work, a good 
business head and and ambitious plans. 

Starting out as a home builder, he graduated into a 
land devel(^r and now- owns a successful real estate 
ccHnpany. 

The homes he built grace inch subdivisions as 
Witchduck Landing in Virgmia Beach. 

Parker has served as a member of the Virginia Beach 
Planning Commission and as president Of Tidewater 
Muhiple listing Service. 

His soi. Bailey Parker m helps direct Common- 
wealth Realty CcxpcxdXioa, which recently won an 
award as the tc^ HRA Realty office in terms of public 
service. Its employees cdlected more money for 
charity than any dher ERA office in Virginia. 

Now Parker wiU direct some of his considerable 
energy toward making his Cadillac dealership one of 
the best in the state. 

The 55-year-dd Parker is undaunted by his lack of 
experience in the car btisiness. 
f "If you believe in a product, you'll have no trouble 
selling it, I intend to give the dealettlliip my undivided 
attention until we get it up to the vdlune we w^t." 




' End of Season 

CLOSEOUT 



We have 4 well equipped, low mileage 
executive demonstrators which must be 
sold. If you've been thinking about 

1982 DODGE CONVERTIBLES buying a convertible 

~ DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 




$iooo 

BELOW FACTORY INVOICE 




y^^ 




3443 Virginia Beach Blvd. 
Virginia Beach 



463-6100 



■r^ 



•^^ 



Get the Great Pair to stop wear. 

.Motorcraft Oil and Oil Filter. 




Ford 



i 



2717 Virginia Beach Blvd. 486-2717 



SUPER SIX 
PACK SALE: 

3 quarts of Motorcraft Super Preihium Motor Oil 

and One FL-IA Filter For Only *^ -a 

*7.70 indudes S^.SO rebate 

f rom KfotoTjcraf t 

EXPIRES l'l-30-» 



«7. 

(regularly M7.00) 



{' 







^^&Hi-^-: 



KIMNACH FORD 

TRUCK SALE 

SAVE 

»500-*2000 



1982 OR 1983 

F-SERIES 
RANGER 
BRONCO 

VANS 



KIMNACH FORD 

6401 E. Virginja Beach Blvd 

(Jni Off Newlowa Rd. Exit) 

4«1-<401 



RK'S CITY WIDE 

USED CAR 

SALE 



1977 NOVA 

2 Dr, CoBcoanc, AMo. PS, AC 

•2^75 



1979 CHEVY C-10 

3 ^wed. Power »«erfa«, Stk. 

•3975 
1980 MONZA HATCHBACK 

4 Speed, Pow0 Steerint, Cokir Kqwd Whedt. Stk. 

•3275 
1981CHEVETTE 

4 Oow. 4 ^d. AM/FM »crao C^neOe, SMe. 

•4275 




LyiAsvM Fkwy . 
MVa,^AMvd. 



486-2222 

DMVtN 



RED-WHITE-BLUE 

SALE 

DISCOUNTS UP TO 



3000. 



00 



10.9% 



GMAC 
HNANCING 
AVAH^LE 



KLINE 
CHEVROLET 




i<m%,wmmn 

3MNtf$Mtli 
ardt 



424-1811 



THINK 



IMnlr StiyingB 
IMnIc SmImeHon 
IMnlr SmnHcm 



bJ Bammr Bvkk 
E3 Btumt BtM€ 
Bannt Bt^ek 





19tX 

CBtrmr 

'1900 



mOHJMK 



•1632 




19^ 






THINK 



BaniteTn^^U 



AND YOU 

VMU. 

Mm